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Your Electric Toilets Analysts Will Turn You Into a Master Fisherman 

Raritan Engineering Company your electric toilets experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding 5 amazing tips to catching Kingfish.

Your electric toilets professionals know that just one fish can put you on top of the world. Nowhere does this ring truer than on the kingfish-­tournament circuit. In these events, each team is allowed to weigh in only one king mackerel per day of competition.

Yet the path to glory is paved with more than positive thinking and a sprinkle of luck. On this highly competitive trail that ranges from the Carolinas to the Florida Keys to the coast of Texas, a one-hundredth of a pound might separate a championship team and the first-place loser (aka second place).

To isolate key factors to catching these wily, sharp‑toothed speedsters, we canvassed some of the leading tournament anglers. 

1. The Right Boat

You can catch king mackerel from just about any boat, but the most consistent winners show up with 23- to 45-foot center-console kingfish-fishing machines from builders such as Contender, Everglades, Invincible, Intrepid, Jupiter, Regulator, SeaVee and Yellowfin.

Serious competitors have the need for speed, so most of these boats sport twin or triple outboards — some even have quads.

Power is one thing, but you also need a hull designed to run in rough conditions because the seas are not always cooperative on tournament day. “That’s why we fish a boat like the Contender 32ST,” says Jack Bracewell Jr., whose South Carolina team fishes 15 kingfish tournaments a year aboard Eren’s Addiction Too, powered by twin Mercury Verado 300 outboards.

2. Rig for Success

Proper boat rigging ranks as a high priority among serious kingfish anglers. Rigging must accommodate a wide range of techniques, including ­downrigger-trolling, kite-fishing, slow-trolling, drifting or even anchoring, any of which might be needed, depending on the time of year or coastal region.

Finding king mackerel means having an arsenal of marine ­electronics to locate key structure spots such as wrecks and reef edges, as well as schools of bait.

In addition, the most successful teams have their boats fully stocked with all the lures, rigs, leader material and terminal tackle (like live-bait hooks) they might possibly need. 

3. Do Your Homework

Research represents the most critical element. “About five days before the tournament, I start checking the Internet for fishing reports in the area,” Smith says. “Also, I keep an eye on sea-surface temperature and chlorophyll patterns on sites such as sst-offshore.com.”

Go to http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/choosing-your-marine-toilet/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on electric toilets and on the top 5 tips for catching Kingfish at Raritan Engineering.

Your electric toilets analysts know that talking to local anglers is also an important part of doing your homework, but you can’t always take them at their word, according to Smith.

4. Baited Question

Silvery live baits such pilchards, threadfin herring, menhaden, mullet and blue runners are preferable to dead baits, according to virtually all top tournament anglers.

While opinions vary about the best bait species, there is consensus about the size of the bait for trophy kings. “The bigger kings seem to favor the bigger baits,” says Dean Panos, who runs the Double D, a 34-foot SeaVee Open on the tournament circuit. 

Smith agrees. “Big baits equal big fish,” he says. Smith also has a trick for making natural baits appear even larger: He adds some “flash” to an otherwise conventional wire-leader, twin-treble bait rig. The captain uses a blue Private Stock Skirt from Blue Water Candy Lures in front of a live bait (see illustration below).

Dead baits don’t swim, so trophy seekers often combine a swimming lure with a dead bait. One of the hottest lure/bait rigs is the Pirate Plug from South Chathum Tackle. 

5. Fish a Spread

Fishing as many baits as possible helps multiply the opportunities for hookups — and the more fish you hook, the better your chances of hooking a trophy.

“I try to fish as many baits as possible,” says Smith. “We fish as many as six lines at a time, including two off the T-top 150 feet back, two others from the transom 100 feet back, and two on downriggers.”

Another way to expand the spread is to fly a kite — a ­technique employed by many successful tournament anglers. Kites let you present baits a good distance from the boat, and this can help you entice line-shy kings to bite.

“My favorite way to fish is with a combination of three kites on one side of the boat and flat lines on the other side,” says Victor Jensen, whose South Florida team fishes the Reel Tension, a 29-foot SeaVee powered by twin Mercury Verado 300s. 

You can’t set and forget when fishing a spread. All of the top anglers check their baits frequently, as kings are known for nipping at baits without getting hooked. Checking the baits often helps ensure they are free of slash marks and swimming well.

So don’t forget these helpful secrets to becoming a master fisherman of Kingfish. 1) Make sure you have the right boat;  2) rig for success;  and 3) never forget to do your homework beforehand.

Learn more at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have more information on electric toilets and 5 amazing secrets to catch Kingfish.

via 12 Steps to Catching Trophy King Mackerel

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Your Marine Toilet Specialists Know the Importance of Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine toilet analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to save lives by choosing the right fume detectors. 

Your marine toilet experts understand that having one or more sources of fuel on board presents a potential danger, especially if you are unaware of leaks or vapor accumulation. Fuel can include gas, diesel and gas burning appliances for cooking or heating.

Your toilets for boats specialists know that many boaters have some serious misconceptions about fuel fumes in the bilge or engine compartment. One is that the engine blower will eliminate dangerous fuel vapors prior to starting a gasoline engine. 

Your macerating toilet experts know that on a typical enclosed boat you should have detectors and associated alarms that alert you to the presence of CO, fumes (including fuel, solvents gasses and others) and smoke.  This normally means that you need more than one type of detector. You may even need more than one of the same type of detector.  For example, a smoke detector in an airtight engine space won’t help you with a galley fire. 

You can find more information as well as get assistance on macerating toilet and on how to save lives by choosing the right fume detectors at Raritan Engineering.

Your Marine Toilet Professionals Show You How to Buy the Right Detectors

The good news is that some detectors will detect more than one type of problem. For example, your portable boat toilets professionals know that some fuel vapor detectors will not only detect gas fuel vapors, they may be able to detect other combustible vapors such as cooking fuels, hydrogen, solvents, and certain cleaning compounds. 

What you get for your boat depends on your boat, its systems, its layouts and many other factors. And even if you feel entirely confident of your boat (and you shouldn’t) keep in mind that other boats in the marina or at the anchorage may be emitting, for example, CO, which is entering your boat through its vents or ports. With all this in mind, check the specifications for the detectors you buy to be sure that you’re well covered. Different detectors perform differently. 

The Effects of Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide (CO) needs special mention. It can overcome a person quickly it can be fatal in just minutes-see the chart below. Your porta potties for boats analysts know that the most prevalent source of CO is exhaust from gasoline engines and generators.

Since carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless, the installation of CO detectors aboard all recreational boats is recommended. The American Boat and Yacht Council now requires all new boats with gasoline inboards or generators to have a CO detector installed.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers when making the decision to buy your next carbon monoxide detector. 1) Having one or more sources of fuel on board presents a potential danger;  2) there is good news is that some detectors will detect more than one type of problem;  and 3) carbon monoxide can overcome a person quickly and can be fatal in just minutes.

Raritan Engineering always has more information on marine toilet, macerating toilet, macerator pump, and on how to save lives with carbon monoxide detectors.

via CO and Fume Detectors