Thermal-Imaging Systems

Your Seacocks Specialists Discuss How to Use Marine Thermal Cameras to Your Advantage

Raritan Engineering your seacocks distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the benefits of marine thermal cameras.

Your seacocks manufacturers talk about marine thermal-imaging systems such as those from FLIR and Iris enhance navigational safety at night by enabling boaters to see obstructions such as lobster-pot buoys, floating debris and other unlit, low-lying objects that might not show on radar.

This technology can also help you find fish. With thermal imaging, for example, you can see weed lines and kelp paddies on the ocean at night, says Lou Rota, vice president of worldwide sales for FLIR Maritime. Such floating vegetation, which attracts offshore fish, possesses minute heat differences that thermal imaging can detect.

Thermal cameras can also see fish at night. “We’ve had a lot of people saying that they’ve hooked tuna after finding breaking fish before daylight by using a thermal-imaging camera,” says Rota. “Many anglers also tell us that they can spot schools of bait fish dimpling the surface in the dark.

Black Hot shows warmer objects in darker shades versus the traditional White Hot thermal image, which turns warmer objects a lighter shade.

Ever notice how things often change temperature before they fail? Cold things get hot, hot things get cold? So it figures that an infrared, or thermal, camera would be a great tool for preventive maintenance. 

Finding a Thermal Detective

Many surveyors have added thermal detecting to their services, but do your due diligence before hiring one. Not all are qualified—some have the camera, but not the experience and expertise to interpret the images accurately. 

Check us out at Raritan Engineering, where we have all the seacocks for all your sanitation needs.

Finally, a professional thermographer will have better equipment than you or I will buy, unless we want to get silly with money. It can record 20 minutes of radiometric data at 30 frames per second (essentially thermal videos) that Allinson can then analyze frame-by-frame; many thermal cameras record, but don’t allow analysis later. It’s a lot more camera than most of us need.

Be Your Own Thermal Detective

Hiring a thermal detective for a one-time scan only tells you what’s what at the time, but problems can appear unexpectedly on a boat. So the best way, I think, to use thermography in a scheduled maintenance program is to invest in a thermal camera (you don’t have to spend 40 grand), acquire the know-how to use it skillfully, and make it a step in your maintenance program.

Thermography Training

You’ve bought a thermal camera, and now you have to figure out how to use it. There are many paths to enlightenment, and they all start with Googling “thermography training.” 

Certification training, however, isn’t free: A four-day Level I Certification course, taught in a classroom, costs $1,995. (Level II and III courses all cost the same; each builds on the previous level.) I think certification is a necessity if you’re planning on making money with your thermal camera. 

 But if you just want to maintain your own boat, maybe you should save your money. Amazon.com has a raft of thermography books, from expensive textbooks to nearly free e-books. Before dropping two grand, plus travel expenses, for classroom training, maybe just try a little reading.

Go Thermal Full-Time

Based on the Lepton micro-thermal camera, the AX8 system connects one or more cameras with a laptop or  multifunction display running the operating system and offers full-time thermal monitoring. 

It uses MSX technology to create detailed images. The boat owner can draw regions of interest on an image, add spot meters to watch them closely, and set too-hot and too-cold alarms. 

Cox says the AX8 system is easy to connect. “If you can plug in a cable, you can do it,” he maintains. The system is wired with Ethernet cables; each camera has an I.P. address, so you connect to it like you do any other network device over an Ethernet. It works very much like a video surveillance system.

Playful Orcas Caught Chasing A Boat From Underwater Camera

orca following a boat

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to be chased by a pod of orcas? Well, wonder no more.  A man was boating off the coast of Norway and ran into a pod of orcas, something I am sure that most of us would love to see.  I would be happy to see these amazing creatures from the water’s surface.

The orcas seem to be curious about the boat that is motoring away on the surface and continue to follow it for long enough for us to enjoy their beauty.  The members of the pod swim in a slightly different ways, but they all head in the same general direction.

And it looks like they are enjoying chasing the boat; almost as much as we enjoy this unique video.

Choose your Raritan marine products here and see how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via The Basics of Thermal-Imaging Cameras

via The Benefits of Using Infrared Sensors on Your Boat

via Playful Orcas Caught Chasing A Boat From Underwater Camera

Frank Lanier

Your Thru Hull Fittings Suppliers Discuss How to Prepare Your Marina Bound Boat for the Next Tropical Storm 

Raritan Engineering your thru hull fittings experts would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to avoid the frustrations of damaging storms to your marine bound boat. 

With Hurricane Irma poised to rake Florida and other states with storm surge and 100-plus knot winds, the storm poses a serious threat to boats all along the East Coast. 

Practical Sailor has covered storm preparation on several occasions. The two most extensive articles appeared in July 2008 “Gear for Battening Down Ahead of Storms,” and “Tropical Storms Dos and Don’ts,” from November 2011. 

Our first choice in a storm is a haul out facility, preferable well-inland and out of the path of the storm.The facility shouldn’t be vulnerable to storm surge, and it should be equipped with fixed anchors to tie your boat down. Second choice would be a hurricane hole with good holding, again well inland and out of the storm’s path.  

• Dock line size varies both with boat size and expected wind speed. Boats docked in hurricane or other severe weather areas should consider going up a size from common recommendations. 

• Loads on the cleat of a 35- to 40-foot boat during an actual hurricane can exceed one ton. While boat building standards (the American Boat and Yacht Council in the U.S.) specify load-carrying ability, some older dock cleats are not up to snuff. 

• If your boat is 30-feet or longer and you do not yet have mid-ships cleats for attaching spring lines, consider adding them at the next opportunity. These should be sized and backed in the same manner as bow cleats, since loads are the same or greater. t is best aligned to withstand the loads (see above point).

•Remember the chafing gear. Preferably something water can permeate for cooling and lubrication. For a round-up of effective chafe gear see “Round 2: Chafe Gear for Mooring and Dock Lines,” October 2012.

• Removing canvas and sails reduces windage. Specifically, remove the furling jib, one of the most common storm casualties. Dodgers and other canvas will also suffer if left up during the storm.

Your Thru Hull Fittings Manufacturers Continue Talking About Protecting Your Valuable Boat During Stormy Times

• Use plenty of fenders. Your thru hull fittings professionals talk about how fenders need to protect you from the dock and neighboring boats. A fender board can be particularly useful in some scenarios. 

• Check your neighbors’ lines. If the boat appears to pose a threat to your own, try to contact the owner, and notify the marina staff. Failing these, deciding whether to take action yourself is a personal decision. What would you want someone to do if the boat was yours?

• Floating versus fixed docks. Properly designed floating docks are generally considered a safer option than fixed docks, with some important caveats. The support pilings must be high enough for the predicted storm surge. 

• Using anchors. If you side-tie and you don’t have a tie-off point opposite to your dock, well-set anchors with plenty of scope can help relieve the pressure on your fenders. Unfortunately, many marinas offer very poor holding. 

• Lastly, any marina facing significant storm surge is simply not safe, but those protected from a long fetch by a low wave barrier are particularly vulnerable. Boat owners on the Chesapeake got an expensive lesson in this during Hurricane Isabel. 

How To Protect Your Boat During A Hurricane

Land Storage

Boats stored on land tend to fare better than boats kept in the water. If you’re able to arrange haul-out and storage, choose a location on high ground, since low-lying areas are prone to flooding during a hurricane.

via Preparing a Marina-Bound Boat for a Tropical Storm

via How To Protect Your Boat During A Hurricane

Image result for johnny depp yacht

Boat Head Dept Discusses: Jaw Dropping Celebrity Private Yachts

When you are the world’s biggest stars you can travel the world in style and comfort that most common people can only dream about If it is for business or pleasure these stars spent a fortune buying their private yachts and jets, customizing it to their needs and desires and making sure the world knows it. A few have the flight bug and not only pilot their own jets, they also collect them. Others prefer the ocean and crystal clear waters and built a floating hotel on water that has all the latest gadgets and luxuries. Either way, we can only assume their financial advisers are not too happy about it as both Yachts and Jets are not considered a smart investment.

Oscar-winning actress and philanthropist Angelina Jolie owns a Cirrus SR22 plane and recently obtained her pilot’s license. It’s not likely that she will be able to take all of her family on a joyride but it is very helpful when you need to get to important meetings and beat LA traffic.

It seems that his role in “Top Gun” left him with a passion for aviation and so, Tom Cruise is the proud owner of a Gulfstream IV, a business jet able to accommodate up to 19 passengers and 2 crew members.

He is one of the biggest names in Hip-Hop for over 3 decades so you better be sure that FKA Puff Daddy knows how to treat himself. This lush beauty on the water requires 10 staff members on board and can host up to some big parties with a projector screen, stage, and a party floor with a built-in bar.

via 27 Jaw Dropping Celebrity Private Jets & Yachts

via Photo

Image result for sailing at night

Raritan’s Macerating Toilet Distributors Talk About Night Sailing Safety 

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the best ways to enjoy night sailing.

Your macerating toilets experts talk about how achluophobia, the fear of the dark, is the third most common phobia in the world, with nearly 75 percent of adults reporting some level of fear when the lights go out. According to researchers at the University of Toronto, the fear of darkness is directly tied to the fear of the unexpected. 

PLANNING

Weather and Course

All good sailors know that planning is essential to a successful trip, but when sailing at night it is paramount. Check multiple weather sources frequently and especially in the hours leading up to sunset. Make sure you have studied your charts and know your nighttime route thoroughly. 

Emergency Exit

While you are examining your charts, identify a few key locations (if applicable) you can divert to in the event that you face unexpected inclement weather. The lee of an island, a protected bay, or an alternative harbor facility are all options. 

Timing

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Plan the arrival at your destination during daylight hours, especially if you are unfamiliar with the passage or harbor. Arriving during the day gives you better visibility for unlit markers, natural hazards, and the advantage of knowledgeable harbormasters and dockhands to assist you.

WATCH KEEPING

Schedule

Unless you are sailing solo, it is a good idea to put in place a structured schedule to dictate watch keeping duties while sailing at night. A clear schedule gives all crew members accountability during the passage and prevents individuals from getting overly fatigued and making potentially critical mistakes.

Rotations

Standard watch keeping is set in four-hour rotations which is the amount of time needed for a full cycle of REM sleep. If there are two people aboard and you are traveling only for one night, the recommendation is to establish a four-hour solo shift, followed by a one-hour shift with both people on watch, followed by a four-hour solo shift. 

If there are more than two people on the boat, set up a rotation with a primary, secondary, and off-shift person. The secondary person is “on call” for assistance that the primary watch keeper may need while the off-shift person gets uninterrupted sleep.

PERSONAL SAFETY & COMFORT

Safety is always the most important factor to consider when sailing, and there are several safety rules that should always be observed when sailing at night.

Lifejacket

The first and most important rule is to always wear a lifejacket…and wear it correctly. It’s a hotly debated topic whether you should choose an automatically inflating vest or a manual one (read about The Great Inflatable PFD Debate and get the lowdown on the different styles from an expert). 

Stay Fueled + Warm

Food, hydration, and proper attire are important considerations for nighttime crew that are easily overlooked. Having snacks, water, warm beverages, and plenty of layers within reach can make your night shift more enjoyable. 

Think Ahead

Lastly, think of all the other things you may need to have on deck with you during your shift and have them ready when the time comes. A good kit might include a headlamp, spotlight, smart phone, headphones, Chapstick, Kindle, logbook, and writing utensil. 

VESSEL CONSIDERATIONS

Be Ready for Changes

If your vessel is not equipped with roller furlings, make sure that you have prepared before dark for potential sail changes, reefing, and wind shifts. If you think the wind is going to lighten up halfway through the night, have a larger geneoa rigged and ready at the bow for a quick and easy change between shifts. 

Reporters rescued after boat crash, harrowing night in hurricane-battered bayou

In a harrowing survival story emerging from Hurricane Harvey’s assault on southeast Texas, a pair of journalists documenting a seemingly routine civilian boat rescue survived near-electrocution and blunt force trauma, and clung to tree branches for 18 hours through hallucinations and relentless rainstorms before being rescued by chance late Tuesday morning.

Within minutes, the powerful currents were dragging the tiny vessel toward downed power lines 20 feet away in a swampy offshoot of Houston’s overflowing Buffalo Bayou.

“The boat hit the powerlines, shocked everyone, rebounded back toward me and [then] I remember seeing the black smoke billowing out of the boat.”

Like a bug zapper amplified 10 million times

The two reporters said they had just gotten settled into the bow of the boat and were in high spirits, joking around with each other and anxious to capture some compelling video of a rescue when the accident occurred.

“This went on for probably a couple hours and I kept on saying, ‘Hold on to more branches, hold on to more branches, hold on to more,’ and he finally said, ‘it’s breaking’ and ‘it’s broke’ — and I remember seeing his head bobble away and I remember thinking, ‘Oh no! Oh no!’

‘Desperate’

Soon there was nothing to do but wait. The rain was pouring down in sheets, darkness was moving in, and the men took turns calling out for help.

Before the afternoon rescue mission, Butterfield and Connellan had given little thought to alerting editors or local officials about their locations for safety’s sake. No one else knew where they were.

“I had some real hope that we were going to be rescued, but sadly no,” Butterfield said. “And then darkness fell.”

So don’t forget these helpful tips for enjoying night sailing. 1) Be sure to plan well in advance;  2) make a good schedule for watchmen;  and 3) be safety conscious.

Choose your Raritan marine products here from us at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via Sailing at Night

via Reporters rescued after boat crash, harrowing night in hurricane-battered bayou

via Photo

U.S. Navy file photo

Raritan Macerator Toilet Experts Talk About How Caution Is Needed When Salvaging Storm Damaged Boats

Raritan Engineering your macerator pump manufacturers would like to share with you this week some information regarding how to properly rescue a storm damaged boat.

When people are hurt and homes and precious possessions are destroyed or lost forever, a wrecked recreational sailboat seems wholly unimportant. But for many people, the boat is their home or is connected to their livelihood.

In the coming days and weeks, more people will be returning to their vessels in the wake of Hurricane Harvey and doing what they can to keep them safe. I’ve been through two Category 5 hurricanes (one ashore, one afloat) and several smaller ones.

Here, according to the Boat Owners Association of the United States, are some of the steps you can take to prevent further damage.

If your boat has washed ashore, remove as much equipment as possible to a safe place to protect it from looters or vandals. 

Protect the boat from further water damage resulting from exposure to the weather. This could include covering it with a tarp or boarding-up broken windows or hatches. 

Your Macerator Toilet Professionals Continue Discussion on the Best Way to Save Storm Damaged Boats

Your macerator toilet specialists talk about how any engines and other machinery that has been submerged or has gotten wet should be “pickled” by flushing with fresh water and then filling with diesel fuel or kerosene.

If your boat is sunk or must be moved by a salvage company, it is not recommended that you sign any salvage or wreck removal contract without first getting approval from your insurance company.

To that advice, I’d add the following: BE CAREFUL!

Some things to watch for:

  1. Do not attempt to use any AC-powered electrical equipment or power hookups that have been submerged until they have been tested and verified as safe.
  2. Avoid entering the water in areas where a threat of electrocution still remains. This is more relevant to freshwater areas, where the risk of electric shock is greater.
  3. Be particularly careful with unfamiliar powered cutting tools, portable generators, or power equipment in general. 
  4. In yards or on land, be especially cautious working around boats that are not properly stabilized by jackstands or something similar. 
  5. If you will be making an insurance claim or seeking assistance from federal agencies (available to those who work or live on their boat), take pictures of boat damage or damaged equipment, and keep a log of any efforts you take to prevent further damage.

At least 4 loaded Bristol Bay fishing boats swamped in bad weather

At least four commercial fishing vessels partially sank in Bristol Bay after boats heavy with salmon had difficulty navigating poor weather in the region.

Colclough said good Samaritan vessels assisted in recovering everyone on board and no one was injured. He did not know Monday how many people were rescued.

But the sinkings come as the salmon season in Bristol Bay ramps up. Alaska Department of Fish and Game area biologist Tim Sands said fishing in the area had been getting progressively slower since the end of last week, but that Monday morning the sockeye run surged.

Official tallies for the day won’t be available until Tuesday, but Sand received reports of vessels delivering up to 17,000 pounds of fish to processors Monday. The average delivery is closer to 3,000 pounds.

Jean Barrett, port director for the city of Dillingham, said he received reports of winds up to 40 miles per hour on the bay Monday. A boat sinking in Bristol Bay is rare, Barrett said, and multiple boats in a single day even rarer.

No fisheries have closed as a result of this incident, but a nearby cannery suspended purchase of fish from the area of the grounding as a precaution. 

In an emergency order Monday, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game warned fishermen to be alert to any fuel sheens in the areas surrounding the sunken vessels.

 Have you ever wondered how a macerator pump works?

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via Stay Safe While Saving a Storm-damaged Boat

via At least 4 loaded Bristol Bay fishing boats swamped in bad weather

How to Bleed Hydraulic Steering

Your Macerator Pump Specialists Give the Instructions Needed to Bleed Your Hydraulic Steering Properly

Raritan Engineering your macerator pump distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding performance enhancing tips for your outboard engine.

Your macerator pump suppliers talk about how steering is arguably the most important system with respect to safe boating. When your hydraulic steering gets spongy, sloppy or otherwise unresponsive, it’s time to check everything for leaks, correct the problem, and then purge the system of air. 

Step 1

For a single-station, one-cylinder rig, start by screwing the filler kit onto a bottle of SeaStar hydraulic-steering fluid. Next, unscrew the vent plug at the helm and insert the hose from the filler kit. Invert and suspend the steering-fluid bottle in whatever way you can. 

Step 2

Allow the hose to fill entirely with fluid while you put clear plastic tubes onto the bleeder valves and run them into a ­container to collect the excess hydraulic fluid.

Step 3

The fluid will get low in the supply bottle as you purge, so you need to fill it again with either new fluid or the collected fluid from the bleed valves. Do not let the fluid get below the filler tube, or you will have to start over because air will be reintroduced to the system.

Browse our macerator pumps here at Raritan Engineering and see why we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Step 4

Have an ­assistant turn the wheel clockwise until the cylinder is fully extended. Open the right-side bleeder. Hold the cylinder in place with your hand while your assistant turns the wheel counterclockwise. 

Step 5

Stop turning the wheel counterclockwise. Open the left-side bleeder. Turn the wheel clockwise while you hold the cylinder in place with your hand. 

How to Add Fluid to Hydraulic Steering

You turn the wheel, and it feels sloppy or requires extra effort. It’s time to purge and add hydraulic fluid.

In this situation, you’ll need to get some hydraulic-steering fluid that meets Mil-Spec H-5606C standards, such as Sea Star/Bay Star No. HA 5430; an adapter hose, like Sea Star No. HA 5438; and a pushpin from the bulletin board in your office.

  • Thread filler tube into helm pump
  • Thread bottle of fluid onto filler tube
  • Poke a hole into the bottom of the bottle (or, cut the bottom off and create a funnel)
  • Turn bottle upside down (like an IV)

NOTE: AT ALL TIMES BE SURE THERE IS FLUID IN THE FILLER TUBE, IF IT DRAINS OUT YOU ARE PUMPING AIR IN THE SYSTEM AND YOU WILL NEED TO START OVER

  • Turn steering wheel hard to starboard
  • OPEN starboard bleeder nipple located on the steering cylinder
  • Turn steering wheel to the port side pumping air/fluid out of bleeder fitting
  • When an air free stream is seen, CLOSE bleeder nipple
  • Continue turning to the PORT side until engine comes hard over

TIP–puncture the bottle on the bottom side, not the very bottom, with the pushpin. Doing so enables you to place the pushpin back in and store a partially-full bottle on a shelf without leaks.

Diesel Outboard Engine

The Coast Guard currently uses both diesel and gasoline to fuel its surface fleet; while diesel is the dominant fuel for cutters and many boats, the service operates hundreds of gasoline-powered outboard engine boats.

The RDC, based in New London, Connecticut, is in the third phase of the project – actual testing of diesel outboard engine technology. Testing covers performance assessments as well as long-term reliability, availability and maintenance data collection. 

“Since this technology is so new, industry partners are just as eager as the Coast Guard to put real operational hours on these engines to better understand their capabilities and limitations,” said Lt. Keely Higbie, a member of the RDC’s Diesel Outboard Engine team.

“Training Center Yorktown has provided exceptional technical and operational expertise and support to date, working with both the RDC and industry to effectively integrate these engines onto their boat platforms,” said Lt. Carl Brietzke, the RDC’s Diesel Outboard Engine project manager. 

In addition to hosting a wide variety of Coast Guard personnel and other government agency stakeholders, Training Center Yorktown offers other benefits as well.

To initiate the project, the RDC conducted a market survey to determine the characteristics and development status of diesel outboard engines in the 150 to 300HP range currently available on the market. 

Ultimately, the analysis concluded that the Coast Guard can experience significant operation, maintenance, infrastructure and logistics cost savings through integrating diesel outboard engine technology into future boat fleet designs.

Other benefits of a single-fuel fleet:
• Improved interoperability with Coast Guard cutters, Department of Defense assets, and foreign nations due to increased fuel availability
• Reduced concerns about fuel availability during natural disasters or other major events
• Elimination of half of the Coast Guard’s fueling infrastructure

The results of the cost-benefit analysis were briefed to other government agencies and industry at the Multi-Agency Craft Conference in June 2016. 

“This project is a great example of government agencies working together to eliminate duplication of efforts,” said Lt. Steven Hager, Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (CG-926) domain lead for the project.

Don’t forget to reserve your items here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via How to Bleed Hydraulic Steering

via How to Add Fluid to Hydraulic Steering

via Research Development Test & Evaluation Spotlight: Diesel Outboard Engine