Drew Frye

Why Not Try Do-It-Yourself Mildew Preventers?

Experts recently made a pleasant little finding when they were investigating and checking various anti-mildew protectants. A couple of inexpensive do-it-yourself concoctions did as well as or better than market solutions which are 20 to 100 times more costly. Now this was not a big a surprise for the team of experts, who based the homebrew solutions on a few of the more efficient anti-mildew products from former tests.

The 13-product evaluation field consisted of liquid sprays, and gels and solids which work through producing a vapor. The three vapor products were Star brite’s NosGUARD SG, which reacts with water in order to release chlorine-dioxide gas; Forespar Tea Tree Power, a tea tree oil-based solution in a vented tub; and Pur-A-Fy Air from Nature’s Innovative Solutions, a lemongrass oil-based gel.

The liquid-spray group included Forespar’s Tea Tree Oil Spray, Henkle Chemical’s Renuzit, Siamons Concrobium, Goldshield, and 3M’s Marine Mildew Block, that performed effectively in our June 2010 test. Concrobium is readily available in liquid as well as vapor form; we tested the liquid. Our most efficient commercial product, Goldshield 5 (diluted to the equivalent of Goldshield 75), is an quaternary ammonium formula established by scientists at Emory University. As our dehumidifier field examinations demonstrated, the first line of defense is controlling humidity. One thing I have touched on in previoius blog articles about combating mildew. When it comes to sealed lockers, or tight quarters which are challenging to treat or ventilate, you may additionally wish to look at our report on chemical dessicants like DampRid.

The two do-it-yourself spray formulas we evaluated each cost about one penny per ounce. Just like the additional mold preventers in our test, you make use of those as cleansers by simply spraying the product on, cleaning any type of excess away, and leaving it on. Before applying to any fabric, test the spray on an inconspicuous sample area.

Formula A.

1 quart hot water.

1 tablespoon baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

2 tablespoons washing soda (sodium carbonate).

2 tablespoons trisodium phosphate (TSP) 5.

Similar To Concrobium (which it is actually designed after), our homemade Formula A removed the mildew and mold from test carpeting on board and kept it away, even though the spot got moist again. It was also extremely effective in the moist-environment lab test.

Formula B.

1 quart hot water.

2 tablespoons baking soda.

2 tablespoons Borax.

1 tablespoon TSP.

Formula B was actually the second-place performer in the fluid group. It was definitely the very best value. It cleaned effectively, protected against mildew and mold from coming back to the carpet, and significantly slowed down mildew contamination in the moist-environment test in the lab.

We also had a go at treating with plain vinegar, which apparently works on some hard surfaces, but testers found the smell a little too overwhelming. A 10-percent solution of household bleach (3-percent sodium hypochlorite) was one of the best cleansers, but this has to be used with care. Bleach will bleed or degrade many fabrics, and could damage the marine environment.

Visit us here at http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/holding-tanks-accessories/ and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

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Check Out Some Easy Ways to Upgrade Your Boating Gear

Expert riggers are skilled tinkerers: Put a length of rope in their hands, and they’ll immediately start thinking of ways to splice it, strip it, taper it, and eventually prevent making use of any type of knot, that we all know can compromise a rope’s breaking strength.

Switch out your wire lifelines.

Wire lifelines are history (unless your one-design class guidelines state otherwise). Dyneema is the best choice, particularly Dyneema SK90, which is up to three times stronger compared to comparable sized 1×19 stainless steel wire. You are likewise able to get rid of all the affiliated hardware, consisting of toggles, eyes, and turnbuckles.

See your sheets or halyards at night.

Anyone can now have customized lines produced with glow-in-the-dark markers wound right into the cover. A few manufacturers, such as Marlow, now provide this with regard to full lengths, or specific spans of your specified lines. Make use of it with regard to all your halyards and sheets, or perhaps select a couple of control lines that you have to quickly identify at night.

Blend hoist markings into your halyard covers.

As with the glow-in-the-dark markers, these marks could be woven right into the cover at a pre-determined place in the rope. Gone are the days of permanent markers, whippings, or tape. These types of markers are particular to your line and are certainly not going anywhere.

A new way to connect your jib sheets.

T-Ring systems are a fantastic option available to sailmakers and riggers. A fitting, which resembles a clew ring with a “T” facing into the sail, is sewn into the clew of your jib. Your sheets merely have an eye spliced into the end of each. In order to attach the sheet to the sail, the Dyneema loop goes over the T, through the two sheets’ eyes, and then over the T the other way.

Attach blocks and fittings using soft loops.

Dyneema loops, whether single pass or covered multiple-pass loops, have actually been around for many years. Over the last few years, however, manufacturers have made a concerted attempt to design their items to use this specific technology for attaching their products.

Maximize your winch power with the right cover material.

Using the best cover material, despite the core material you select in your high-tech lines is actually essential to getting optimal grip from your winch drum. The cover is really where the rubber meets the road– where your line hits the winch.

There are multiple options available outside of the outdated standby polyester cover. However the more preferred common-use covers consist of a selection of blends. Polyester/Technora is a combination which incorporates great hold to your winch.

Lock your jib halyard and calibrate tension on the fly.

A halyard-lock along with cunningham is definitely a highly effective tool. Halyard locks possess numerous advantages: Mast compression is removed, and tuning becomes a lot more repeatable. However, another advantage is the capability to change luff tension easily while sailing upwind. When a jib halyard is set onto a lock, the head is at a fixed height. Small modifications while the sails are loaded come to be simple.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering is your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

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Boat Restoration Made Easy

Restoring a boat could definitely be hard work, not to mention an expensive project. Whether or not you’ve just recently bought an old boat that needs to have a bit of TLC, or your own boat is starting to look like it was found on the bottom of the sea, we have shared 5 boat restoration secrets here today which will not only save you money, but will also save you a great deal of time.

1. You don’t need to utilize expensive rust removers anymore!

Forget searching on Amazon.com or any other place when it comes to the latest trend of rust removers. Not only could they be expensive but also extremely harsh if used improperly. Rather, begin searching in the rear of your cupboards. A toothbrush covered in a little bit of baking soda, salt or white vinegar will do just the trick and bring your stained fiberglass up to a sparkly finish.

2. Laundry washing detergent is truly your new best friend!

Believe it or not, laundry detergent not only washes your clothes while out at sea, but likewise works marvels on cleaning your hull. It can easily help dissolve the absolute most persistent oil rings and any nasty dark spots hiding around your boat, that are definitely unavoidable when being submerged in water.

3. Sanding down your woodwork is going to immediately transform your boat

Using an electric sander to remove the old varnish on your boat, ready to repaint with a top quality varnish, will work wonders for renewing your vessel’s finish. Sanding the surface will also clean up any cracks, yellowing and discolorations too.

4. The white vinegar in your cupboard will certainly save you a fortune

As soon as you’ve cleaned up the hull, outside and interior wood, it’s time to tackle the fabrics. Ignore abrasive bleach, expensive fabric cleaners and hazardous smelling carpet shampoos. All you need to have is a bottle of white vinegar.

Get a soft brush and blend some white vinegar along with some water (don’t dilute it too much) and you’re ready to go. The vinegar is going to kill off any mold in fabrics, remove musty odors and right after a brief soak on the carpet and a vacuum, it will definitely clean your flooring up wonderfully.

5. Think outside the box with your furniture

Furnishing on a budget? Try your local yard sales to pick up a few deals, or if you ‘d prefer to invest in some quirky DIY furnishings to go with your new, sparkly boat instead, then look no further than IKEA … yes IKEA!

Not only do they offer inexpensive, modern and simple to put together flat pack furnishings, but their items are also amazingly flexible. 

Soon after finishing our five tips mentioned above, the rest is really up to you! No matter what you decide to do when spending a little time on restoration, we hope we’ve provided you a fantastic start on reviving your boat and getting it up to scratch, ready for an adventure on the water.

Check out some great deals on marine toilets at http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/choosing-your-marine-toilet/

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Dan Dickison
 

Spare Engine Parts

Journeying sailors depend on their engines a great deal more than they like to admit. Although the internet has helped close the gap between parts providers and cruising sailors in far corners of the world, the long-term cruiser nevertheless needs to thoroughly consider which spare components and supplies he needs to carry with him.

Fuel Filters

We found fuel filter components all over the world, but obtaining the quantity and micron ranking we needed to have was no guarantee. Remember that you have at the very least a couple of filters: a remote main filter in between the tank and the engine, as well as a factory-installed secondary filter on the engine itself.

Fuel Injectors

Suggested service intervals for fuel injectors vary by manufacturer, but fuel contamination as well as carbon accumulation is such a typical issue that numerous cruising sailors carry at least one extra injector. If you bring a full set (certainly not cheap) you can still operate your boat while your injectors are being cleaned and serviced. (In the Caribbean, we mailed ours back to the U.S. for servicing).

Motor Oil

In case you’re picky about engine oil– and you should be– you might find your preferred oil in some countries. In some cases it is actually available under a different name, and with a little research you could sort this out. Generally speaking, you’ll manage to find diesel engine oil with the specified American Petroleum Institute (API) certification or its equivalent practically everywhere you can buy fuel. For long-term cruising, carry a minimum for six changes, or about 600 hours of engine operation.

Oil Filters

Oil filters are another concern. There are a lot of selections of oil filters in the world that it pays to do a little research. In Vanuatu, we discovered Napa filters that corresponded our Volvo filters but cost much less, but, once again, if you go this particular course you really want to make sure you are getting the right filter. The moment you do find the right filters, purchase them. They’re a lot harder to find than engine oil.

Belts

You’ll need spare V-belts with regard to you alternator, particularly if it’s the high-output kind. It is nearly impossible to evaluate the quality of a V-belt simply by looking, and when you leave the US, it’s harder to locate the industrial-rated V-belts that you need for high-output alternators. Most belts you locate abroad are fractional-horsepower automotive belts that won’t last long driving a 100-amp alternator, even if you have a dual-belt-drive system (extremely suggested high output alternators).

Gearbox

Most likely one of the most neglected component of the power train is the gearbox. Gearbox fluid does not last forever, but how frequently should you change it? A few engine owner’s manuals don’t even give replacement intervals. Mechanics Nick talked with said the oil in a common two-shaft gearbox, such as the Hurth, should be changed at least at every other engine oil change, or 200 hours of operation. This is simply a preliminary list, but it deals with the most common items.

Raritan is still the most dependable name on the water when it comes to reliability, service and innovation.

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How to Protect Your Watercraft’s Vinyl Seats

Just like you apply sun block to protect your skin– you also should think about protecting your vinyl boat seats from the effects of sun, weather and time. Within this all-hands-on-deck blog, we are going to walk you through a few of the best ways to protect your boat’s vinyl upholstery to prevent future needs for vinyl seat repair work and to keep it looking as good as new!

Step One: Clean Your Boat Upholstery. To clean vinyl surfaces in marine upholstery, make use of a good-quality boat vinyl cleaner– like Gold Eagle’s 303 ® Multi-Surface Cleaner. This particular cleanser cleans and brightens all water-safe surfaces, without leaving any type of residue or streaking behind. It will definitely keep you from needing to carry 15 cleaning products with you for the job. You need a soft brush, a few clean cloths, a toothbrush for crevices, and your high quality vinyl cleaner.To clean boat upholstery, adhere to the instructions on the product you choose. The basic way to clean vinyl is to:

Apply a light coating of vinyl seat cleanser right onto the seat and let it sit for about a minute. Meanwhile, arrange your cleaning supplies.

( SUGGESTION: If utilizing an old towel, cut it into quarter sections, as the smaller pieces make it easier to get into crevices and between cushions.).

Once the cleanser has sat a little bit on the surface, get the soft brush and work over the vinyl in circular strokes, using very little pressure. Vinyl is tough, but the 303 ® Multi-Surface Cleaner does the work for you.

Go over the entire surface of the seat in segments. Use the towel to remove the dust and grime that the cleanser loosens. When it comes to the piping and down into creases, use the toothbrush, just as you did the soft brush. Spray the cleanser straight onto the brush. Then follow with a clean area of towel.

( SUGGESTION: Always utilize a clean portion of the towel to ensure that you are not simply re-applying the grime to the seat.)

Step Two: Protect Your Vinyl Boat Upholstery303 Aerospace Protectant can help you protect most types of boat vinyl, including vinyl seats & more!

Right after your vinyl boat seats have actually been completely cleaned up, safeguard them with a product like 303 Aerospace Protectant. Safe and effective for rubber, vinyl and plastic surface areas, this specific product provides superior UV protection to prevent fading and cracking of the vinyl, repels blemishes, dust and various other stains, and leaves behind a dry, matte finish with no oily feel.

In order to protect your boat seats, abide by the directions on your product. When it comes to protectants such as 303 Aerospace Protectant, the basic standards are:.

Spray the protectant on the cleaned vinyl surface area, and wipe the spot completely dry. For better bonding as well as durability, buff a couple of times with a dry cloth. Repeat this particular procedure, along with cleansing, every three to five weeks so as to make the most of UV protection.

Make sure to comply with this particular cleaning and safeguarding protocol every time you use your boat and, whenever your boat is resting, at least once a week. Doing this will help ensure that your boat’s vinyl surfaces stay tidy, protected, and looking beautiful for years to come!

What to Do When Your Boat Seats Are Harmed.

Vinyl, while strong, sometimes is not strong enough. Either you’ve purchased a boat that was not well cared for, or somebody sat in the seats with a sharp tool in his or her pocket– and now your boat’s seats are damaged. Holes, splits, cracks, and tears happen. To help keep water and salt out of the inside of your upholstery, switch out damaged vinyl.

We offer a complete line of Raritan Marine Products to design your vessel’s marine sanitation system.

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Five Inboard and Sterndrive Engine Checks

 Don’t Forget That Engine!

Maintenance continues to be the key to a better-running engine and much longer engine life. While there’s more to learn than any one article could feature, make these recommended inspections of the following five systems.

For expert insight, we checked in with Volvo Penta’s service training center supervisor Ed Szilagyi, Mercury MerCruiser dealer service expert Rob Gina of Boatwrench in Longwood, Florida, and other marine pros.

Check all of your fluids so as to ensure smooth operation.

1. Fluids
Motor oil should be a clean, amber or gold color. Black oil suggests old and dirty oil; change it. In the event that the oil looks milky or foamy, it’s contaminated by water– bring the motor in for service.

Check power-trim fluid levels. Inspect trim-pump reservoir caps for the milk-carton-like seal beneath the cap. Dispose of this; it inhibits venting and may lead to leaks.

Get rid of the lower gear-case drain screw and check the condition of the lubricant. It ought to be clean, amber- or green-colored, and not filthy or contaminated by water. Burnt lubricant implies improper gear lash and impending failure; milky means water is leaking through a seal, which results in rusted gears, shafts as well as bearings.

Remember to examine engine coolant and power and hydraulic-steering fluid levels.

2. Cooling
Operate the engine on a hose adapter or perhaps at the dock to make sure proper cooling- system operation just before you go.

As soon as the engine is cool, check water hoses for age, brittleness and dry rot. Hoses should be pliant but firm, not mushy.

3. Drives and Props
Check the prop shaft for straightness by standing directly behind it and rotating the propeller, looking for out-of-true rotation. Bring bent props to a prop shop. Look for fishing line snarled all around the shaft where it enters the gear case. This common malady causes seal leakage, allowing water in, gear lube out, or even both.

Look for damage to the skeg. Repair and paint damaged areas.

4. Belts
Push between pulleys; belts ought to bounce back. Look for cracks, fragility and dry rot, and abnormal wear. Look for thin areas.

Rusty, pitted pulleys often indicate an engine water leak. Belt-dust residue likewise suggests damaged pulleys.

5. Steering
Steer from lock to lock. Inspect cables for binding or stiffness. Clean crud from steering rams.

Inspect hydraulic steering for air pockets, sponginess and/or irregular function. Fix steering woes immediately, before using your boat.

6. Fuel Systems
Avoid ethanol fuels when possible. While it’s typically more costly to do so, fueling up at the marina where non-ethanol fuels are readily available could save money in the long run.

If you leave your boat idle for extensive time periods (greater than 60 days), add stabilizer to your fuel supply and run the motor at least 10 minutes in order to disperse the treated fuel throughout the system (fuel lines, filters and injectors or carburetors).

Suggestion: Be sure to utilize sufficient fuel conditioner! If unsure, double the recommended dose. Too much doesn’t hurt anything, but not enough won’t do the job.

7. Anode
Anodes safeguard your drive from corrosion and deterioration. Here’s what to inspect: Ensure your motor and drive have the correct anode for your use– magnesium for fresh water, zinc for brackish and salt water. If you’re not sure, bring your rig to your dealership.

Change all anodes that are less than two-thirds their initial size. Do not repaint over anodes; this prevents all of them from carrying out their job. Be sure to check your owner’s manual for the location of all anodes. Although a few are visible and quickly accessible, some might be located internally and therefore overlooked. For example, Volvo closed-cooling engines have anodes in the heat exchangers.

8. Charging System
It’s certainly not a bad idea to always keep a marine smart charger connected and plugged in any time you’re not making use of your boat.

Keep the terminals and cable ends clean and devoid of corrosion. Cleanse using baking soda or Coke and a wire brush. Do not use wing nuts on the terminals; nyloc nuts will certainly ensure that cable ends stay tight.

Keep the battery cables and wires out of water and damp places. Since they’re covered in plastic sheathing, it’s difficult to notice when they’re corroded inside until it’s too late and your engine won’t start. Be sure all wires are actually marine-grade tinned copper.

9. Hoses
Inspect all water hoses and clamps for tightness, age, fragility and dry rot. Make sure there are no leaks and that hose clamps fit securely without causing damage to hoses. It’s a good idea to keep additional clamps, hose-repair kits/extra hoses in your on-board tools and parts kit.

Great deals at http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/waste-treatment/

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 Are You Sick of Motion Sickness?

If traveling by car, train, plane, or boat makes you queasy, there’s good news: Not only can you take steps to stop motion sickness before it starts, you may actually be able to conquer it for good.

Why some people get motion sickness and others don’t isn’t fully understood. Researchers believe it’s caused by incongruence in our body’s sensory systems. For instance, on a slow-moving cruise ship, your eyes may tell the brain you’re not moving at all, but the systems in your brain and inner ear that control balance and posture (vestibular and somatosensory systems) say, “Yes we are!” This mismatch confuses the brain and causes a variety of symptoms, including:

  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Salivation
  • Sweating
  • Belching
  • Acute awareness of the stomach
  • Vomiting
  • Hyperventilation (in extreme cases)

You certainly can take medications to help relieve these symptoms. But if you’d like to try overcoming motion sickness for good, here are some techniques.

1. Take control of the situation.

Not being in the driver’s seat can contribute to motion sickness when you’re traveling by car. The driver of a car is less prone to motion sickness than a passenger, presumably because the driver’s brain is using its motor commands to control the car and can predict the motion. Putting yourself behind the wheel will keep the queasiness at bay. If you must ride as a passenger, try sitting in the front seat and looking at the horizon, which confers a sense of greater control than riding in the back. If you get stuck in the back seat, try conversation and distraction to alleviate the anxiety of not being in control of the situation. Open a vent or source of fresh air if possible and avoid reading.

2. Curb your consumption.

Watch your consumption of foods, drinks, and alcohol before and during travel. Avoid excessive alcohol, smoking, and foods or liquids that “don’t agree with you” or make you feel unusually full. Foods with strong odors, or ones that are heavy, spicy, or fat-rich may worsen symptoms of nausea or motion sickness in some people.

3. Get into position.

Try to choose a seat where you will experience the least motion. The middle of an airplane over the wing is the calmest area of an airplane. On a ship, those in lower level cabins near the center of a ship generally experience less motion than passengers in higher or outer cabins. Isolate yourself from others who may be suffering from motion sickness. Hearing others talk about motion sickness or seeing others becoming ill can sometimes make you feel ill yourself.

4. Equalize your sensory cues.

If you’re getting seasick, lie down to help your sensory systems become congruent. On a train, sit in a front-facing seat so your eyes relay the same movement cues as the vestibules of your inner ear. Also, when traveling by car or boat, it can sometimes help to keep your gaze fixed on the horizon or on a fixed point. The more you enhance sensory congruence, the less likely you are to get queasy.

5. Talk yourself down.

You actually can talk yourself out of motion sickness. A study found that “verbal placebos” — simply telling sailors they won’t get seasick — have been effective in preventing seasickness. Set your own expectations before traveling by saying aloud, “I’m not going to get carsick this time,” or using other affirmative self-talk.

6. Get desensitized.

Desensitization therapy works for minimizing or even curing motion sickness. Expose yourself to short bursts of activities that cause symptoms, and then work up to longer periods. If reading a book in a moving vehicle makes you feel nauseated, try reading for five minutes and then putting the book down. Repeat the five-minute interval over several sessions, then increase to 10 minutes. Over time, you’ll find your body gets used to the activity.

7. Pre-treat with ginger.

Some studies support using ginger as an effective preventive measure for motion sickness. At the very least, it can’t hurt. Take one to two grams of ginger half an hour before traveling for best results. If you’re on prescription blood thinners, consult your doctor before supplementing with ginger.

8. Get in touch with your pressure points.

There’s conflicting evidence regarding the effectiveness of acupressure for motion sickness, but it’s worth a try — even if it’s just for the placebo effect. As mentioned above, simply convincing yourself you can get through a trip without motion sickness can help you avoid it. If wearing pressure point devices—such as wristbands with plastic bumps on them — helps convince your brain you’re not going to get sick, it’s worth a shot. On the other hand, don’t waste your money on magnets. There’s no evidence magnetic devices marketed for motion sickness relief do any good.

9. Ride it out.

Seasickness clears up on its own after about three days. Why? The human body possesses an enormous ability to accommodate situations like incongruence between the sensory systems. Again, in the “think it away” category, you may rid yourself of symptoms if you understand and believe they’re going to clear up sooner rather than later.

If your children experience motion sickness, be sure to let them know the condition usually starts going away after age 12. Sharing this medical fact may help your kids avoid feeling doomed to motion sickness for the rest of their lives.

10. When all else fails, medicate.

If you experience severe motion sickness, go ahead and take over-the-counter medications such as Dramamine or Meclizine for it. These are most effective 30 to 60 minutes prior to when you think you’ll be sick, and can be sedating. If you’re a healthy adult with severe symptoms, you can talk to your health care provider about a scopolamine patch to cope with prolonged episodes of motion sickness, such as during the first few days of a cruise. Be forewarned that it can cause drowsiness, dry mouth, and other side effects.

via 10 Tips to Beat Motion Sickness

 

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Step-by-step troubleshooting will enable anyone identify issues.

While outboards have become increasingly complex, they continue to operate on much the exact principles as they did before the current wave of EFI/DFI and four-stroke technology.

To start and run, an outboard needs:

Ignition (properly timed)
Fuel/air mixture (in the correct proportion)
Compression
Exhaust

Caution: With the cover removed from the engine, there may be exposed components that could possibly harm you. Unless you are confident in what you are actually doing, leave well enough alone and ask for a tow.

Troubleshooting with most more recent outboards has actually come to be a lot more complicated because of technical advancements like kill switches, start-in-gear protection, electrical ignition and fuel injection, and computer-controlled ignition timing. However this flow chart will help you isolate the issue, so that you may be able to fix it at the dock or ramp using very little tools in a brief amount of time. If not, at the very least, you’ll be able to speak intelligently regarding the problem to a mechanic.

This is by no means a comprehensive troubleshooting manual with regard to starting problems. Purchase a factory service manual for your year/make/model engine. These are developed for technicians so the information could be hard to understand, but they can be a great aid in assisting you identify and take care of problems, if you’re mechanically inclined and have the temperament to do so.

1. Lights And Gauges

In the case that you turn the key to crank the motor and nothing takes place, keep the key in the “on” (not all the way over to start) setting and check to observe if additional components (such as lights and gauges) operate.

2. Battery Switch

In case your boat features a battery switch, make sure that it’s switched to “on” or “both.”.

3. Gear-Shift Position

In the event that you turn the key and the motor will not start but other parts are operating, check the gear shift to make sure it’s solidly in neutral, since many outboards will not actually crank with the engine in gear.

4. Emergency Shutoff

Inspect to see that the emergency shutoff switch cap remains in place. (Depending upon your setup, the motor may not even crank if the kill switch is out.).

5. Battery Cables

If your battery’s reasonably charged, check the battery cables coming from the battery to the engine. Often the positive and negative hookups loosen over time and/or become corroded.

6. Low Battery

If the starter engages and cranks slowly or not at all, your battery may be low. Inspect it using a voltmeter. A minimum of 12 volts is needed.

7. Main Fuse

Check the outboard’s primary fuse. Generally situated in a big red holder on the engine wiring harness, it’s typically a 20-amp fuse that’s easily switched out.

8. Connections

In the event that the fuse is OK, check the primary power plug which connects the engine wiring to the boat.

9. Neutral Switch

In case it still won’t crank, inspect the neutral switch. It’s typically inside the control box attached to yellow and yellow/red striped wires.

10. Starter Solenoid

In the event that you hear a clicking noise or perhaps a low whine but the starter won’t engage the flywheel when you turn the key, the starter solenoid may be bad. Some advise against this, but typically I’ll tap it lightly with a small hammer as a helper turns the key.

11. Primer Bulb

Inspect to see that fuel is actually getting to the engine. Pump the primer bulb (if equipped) and make sure it gets firm after several squeezes. If it doesn’t, look for leakages in the line, the tank or filter, the engine, and a bad valve inside the bulb.

12. Filters

Inspect filter( s) for water and sediment. One is on the engine. Another could be in line outside of the engine.

13. Fuel-Line Couplings

Check that fuel line couplings are safely seated and locked.

14. O-Rings

Examine fuel system O-rings. A torn O-ring might introduce air into fuel.

15. Electric Primer

In case the engine possesses an electric primer, you can usually remove one of the little fuel hoses that proceeds from it to the engine’s intake or carburetor, and have a helper operate the primer (typically pushing the key in) while you monitor to see if fuel squirts out. Avoid letting fuel spill.
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Cheap and Easy Boat Cleaners You Can Make At Home

Raritan Engineering would like to share with you this week some great information about how to make your own boat cleaners.

Your marine toilet systems experts talk about how if you’ve got a locker full of nearly empty black-streak cleaners, waterline-stain cleaners, mildew preventers, bilge cleaners, and boat soaps, now is your chance to retire them all and reduce your cleaning arsenal to just four or five products that can fit in a small bucket.

This is not our first foray into the topic homemade maintenance supplies.  A few years back we dug into the topic of homemade bronze polishes and found a couple of concoctions that proved their mettle—so to speak.

Home brew No. 1: Salt and vinegar paste

Recipe: Dissolve 3 teaspoons of salt into 1 cup of white vinegar. Add enough flour to make a paste, then scoop the paste onto a clean sponge and polish. Rinse with hot water and buff dry with a soft cloth. Result: This polish worked surprisingly well. all and earned a rating of “Good” on our test scale.

Home brew No. 2: lemon paste

Recipe: Polish with a soft cloth soaked in a solution of lemon juice and baking soda, or sprinkle baking soda on a slice of lemon and scrub. (We made a paste as in Brew No. 1.) Result: After the mini-volcanic reaction of mixing lemon juice and baking soda settled down, the resulting paste powered off the stains exceptionally well with minimal scrubbing.

Home brew No. 3, Morris’ Mix:

Recipe: Subscriber Scott A. Morris makes his polish by blending polishing compound (not rubbing compound) with a small amount of silicone car wax—according to Morris, a little experimentation will yield your best mix. Result: “Fair to Good” overall, however, it took a bit of rubbing to clean our nasty bronze.

Benefits of Making Your Own Boat Cleaners

Your marine toilet systems professionals discuss how overall, the results in the home brew category were pretty impressive, particularly considering that the first two have all natural ingredients and that all three are economical to make. While the Brews Nos. 1 and 2 cleaned the bronze, they lacked the “luster” of products such as the Miracle cloth.

Of all the homebrew recipes we’ve tested, the one we’re most pleased with is our One-Penny mildew cleaner/preventer, which tester Drew Frye has tested extensively on his boat. We tried two formulas creatively named Formula A and Formula B, which cost just pennies to make.

Formula A

1 quart hot water

1 tablespoon baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)

2 tablespoons washing soda (sodium carbonate)

2 tablespoons trisodium phosphate (TSP)

Much like Concrobium (which it is modeled after), our homemade Formula A removed the mildew from test carpet on board and kept it away, even though the area got wet again. It was also very effective in the moist-environment lab test.

Formula B

1 quart hot water

2 tablespoons baking soda

2 tablespoons Borax

1 tablespoon TSP

Formula B was the second-place performer overall in our test of mildew sprays. It was certainly the best value. It cleaned well, prevented mildew from returning to the carpet, and greatly slowed mildew infection in the moist-environment test in the lab.

So don’t forget these ways to make your own boat cleaners. 1) Salt and vinegar paste;  2) lemon paste;  and 3) blending polishing compound (not rubbing compound) with a small amount of silicone car wax.

How to Fish Midge Patterns With Style

You’ve probably been there. Two hours from home, halfway through the thermos of coffee, knee-deep in cold water on a cold day, and not a single, solitary fish to show for it. They’re taunting you.

The most likely answer? Midges. Nine times out of ten, when you see so many rings that it looks like the result of an invisible hail-storm, the trout are hitting midges.

But one thing is very clear: trout love to eat midges. Your average brown trout in a midge hatch is like a fat kid with a bowl full of M&Ms. Although each of the bugs may not make much of a meal, a river is like a conveyor belt that delivers thousands of the tiny morsels to a fish. Midge hatches are especially prolific in tailwaters, those rivers kept at constant refrigeration by bottom-release dams.

Midges are usually small, but they aren’t necessarily microscopic. A size 18 barbless hook will provide satisfactory results in most situations. An angler carrying a small midge box with a series of tried-and-true patterns from size 18 down to size 22, with a very few smaller, will be equipped to handle 90 percent of the midge fishing situations out there. Generally speaking, big midges will allow you to use more complex patterns, such as the Copper John. For really tiny midges, stick to the simple stuff.

Try cutting the leader where you want the shot to stop sliding, and then knot it back together with a simple double surgeon’s knot. Crimp the shot above the knot and let it slide on down; the knot will keep the shot from hugging your fly.

A better bet, though, would be one of the new breed of vertical emergers based on the Quigley’s Cripple, such as the JLC Midge. Douse these flies with floatant and lube up your tippet for several feet. You won’t have the advantage of the split shot to keep your line taught and your chances of popping your tippet go up considerably, so be gentle.

Midge fishing in the winter time can be an angler’s only chance to avoid going stir-crazy. When your favorite freestone is snowed in, and your dog won’t even budge off the hearth, bundle up tight, load that thermos, and find a sunny piece of slow water down behind a dam in the valley.

Check us out here at http://raritaneng.com/ and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

via Steer Clear of the Marine Cleaner Con

via Pro Tips: How to Fish Midge Patterns in Winter – Orvis News

 

Your Raritan Marine Professionals Discuss Great Tips for New Boat Buyers

Raritan Engineering your Raritan marine specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding some of the best ways to maintain boats for first time boat buyers.

You bought a boat. Your Raritan marine distributors talk about how why you need to maintain it. Just keep the following three points in mind, and the first year with a new boat should be smooth sailing.

First off, engines, steering equipment, water pumps and anything else aboard that moves will benefit from use. Turn everything on and use it at least a couple of times a season. Raise and lower your anchor at the dock, for instance, if you never anchor out. 

Next, keep it clean. This isn’t just aesthetic. If the engine space is clean, you’ll see an engine-coolant or steering-fluid leak right away, so you can have it taken care of before it gets worse. Debris in the waterways around deck hatches can clog drains. Then when it rains, if the water can’t drain, it finds its way into that hatch, and sometimes onto equipment that shouldn’t get wet. 

We Give Simple Ways to Keep Your Boat Looking Great All Year Long

Browse Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering. Beyond that general advice, here’s a quick list of maintenance items you’ll need to address during your first year:

Engines: In cold climates, winterize engines every fall to protect cooling systems where water might be trapped and freeze. At the same time, treat engine inner workings with fogging oil to prevent corrosion. Except for a few outboards, engines require an oil change, along with new oil and fuel filters, every year. 

Underwater paint and hardware: Change sterndrive or outboard gear-case oil every fall, or at least check for water intrusion while winterizing the engine. Send propellers with more than a couple of minor nicks to the prop shop to be reconditioned. The paint on your boat’s bottom prevents marine growth, such as barnacles and sea grass, but its effectiveness varies by paint type, climate, region and even local water bodies. 

Fiberglass: Rinse your boat thoroughly after each outing, and wash it once a week with mild boat soap—one that won’t remove wax. Southern latitudes and saltwater boating require wax as often as every two months from the main deck up. Northern and freshwater boaters might wax only once a season. 

Teak decks, wood trim and metal hardware: Wax is the best protectant and cleaner for metal, particularly aluminum. Whatever you choose—spanning bright, glossy varnished trim to just soap and water on teak, letting its natural oil protect the wood—stay on top of it. 

Air-conditioning systems: If your boat has air conditioning, consider using the dehumidifier mode while you’re not aboard, but only if you’re able to check on the boat every day or two. Clear debris from air conditioner’s seawater-plumbing strainers at least weekly, or anytime the air conditioner’s cooling-water stream coming out of the side of the boat seems to be weaker than normal.

Owner’s manuals for each onboard system include maintenance schedules. When in doubt, ask a pro. Advice from other boaters is well-intentioned but not always correct for your boat. The boat dealer, or anyone who repairs boats for a living, is a much better source.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to maintain your boat if you’re a first time buyer. 1) In cold climates, winterize engines every fall to protect cooling systems where water might be trapped and freeze;  2) rinse your boat thoroughly after each outing, and wash it once a week with mild boat soap;  and 3) if your boat has air conditioning, consider using the dehumidifier mode while you’re not aboard, but only if you’re able to check on the boat every day or two.

Go Boating on the Red Lotus Sea

The so-called Red Lotus Sea is one of Thailand’s loveliest seasonal attractions. Somewhat off the beaten path for international visitors, the charming destination is popular with Thai couples looking for a spot of romance and families who want to take the kids somewhere special. 

What is the Red Lotus Sea?

Known in Thai as Talay Bua Deang, the Red Lotus Sea (sometimes also referred to as the Red Lotus Lake) is officially called Nong Han Kumphawapi Lake. A large yet rather normal lake at most times during the year, the lake transforms into a magical wonderland of beautiful pink shades during the cooler months. Indeed, due to the picturesque beauty when the striking lotus flowers are in full bloom, the lake has been named as one of the world’s strangest lakes.

How can I explore the Red Lotus Sea?

The lake’s full majestic beauty isn’t immediately apparent from the edges, though you can peer through binoculars to get an idea of the wonder on the water. The best way to enjoy the fairytale-like visions is with a boat ride across the expansive lake. Boat trips can be arranged with ease from the main car-parking area in Chiang Haeo sub-district.

There’s no need to join a tour as you can easily charter your own vessel to discover the lake. Boats cost around 500 THB for a trip, and the prices are per boat, not per person. Boat rides last for around an hour to an hour and a half. (Shorter trips can also be taken for around 300 THB.) 

Your boat will journey into the middle of the lake, following small channels through the lotus flowers, to eventually bring you to a large and dense patch of vibrant pink flowers. Pause and admire the glorious vistas and snap plenty of pictures to remind you of an unusual day filled with scenic splendour. 

What facilities are available near the lake?

Facilities and amenities are basic, though you will find public toilets (with squat-style toilets) and several food vendors in the main car park. Stock up on snacks for a picnic on your boat ride.

Where is the Red Lotus Sea?

The Red Lotus Sea is located in the Thai province of Udon Thani. Udon Thani is in the northeastern region, the part of Thailand that is also commonly referred to as Isan. The lake can be found roughly 45 kilometres outside of the heart of Udon Thani city, in the district of Kumphawapi.

When can I visit the Red Lotus Sea?

The cool season is the prime time to visit the Red Lotus Sea. The pink buds begin to bloom at the end of the rainy season, reaching their peak in January and February. Some flowers remain open through March, but then from March to around October, the lake is devoid of any special colours.   

Choose your Raritan marine products here and see how Raritan Engineering provides you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

via Tips for First-Year Boat Maintenance

via Photo

via Thailand’s Must-Do: Go Boating on the Red Lotus Sea