People in the water after a yacht capsizes in San Francisco Bay

Your Marine Hardware Analysts Say Survival Education Is Necessary

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hardware experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to survive a boat capsizing.

Your marine hardware specialists know that an investigation is underway after a yacht carrying 30 people capsized in San Francisco Bay. Eight people, including three children, needed hospital treatment.

The 34-foot yacht, Khaleesi, capsized 100 yards from Pier 45 in San Francisco Bay, throwing 30 people, including three children, into the water. 

Go to http://www.raritaneng.com/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine hardware and on how to survive a boat capsizing.

Your marine hardware professionals know that at the time, the yacht had 27 adults and three children, on board. Both the US Coast Guard and the San Francisco Fire Department responded to the incident, along with many so-called “good Samaritans”.

An investigation into the incident is now underway.

If you should capsize or swamp your boat, or if you have fallen overboard and can’t get back in, stay with the boat if possible. 

  • If you made the mistake of not wearing a life jacket, find one and put it on. 
  • Take a head count. Reach, throw, row, or go, if needed.
  • If your boat remains afloat, try to reboard or climb onto it in order to get as much of your body out of the cold water as possible. 

If your boat sinks or floats away, don’t panic.

  • If you are wearing a life jacket, make sure that it is securely fastened, remain calm, and wait for help.
  • If you aren’t wearing a life jacket, look for one floating in the water or other floating items (coolers, oars or paddles, decoys, etc.) to help you stay afloat.
  • If you have nothing to support you, you may have to tread water or simply float.

If someone on your boat falls overboard, you need to immediately:

  • Reduce speed and toss the victim a PFD—preferably a throwable type—unless you know he or she is already wearing a life jacket.
  • Turn your boat around and slowly pull alongside the victim, approaching the victim from downwind or into the current, whichever is stronger.
  • Stop the engine. Pull the victim on board over the stern, keeping the weight in the boat balanced, especially in small boats.

So don’t forget these helpful tips for surviving a boat capsizing. 1) If you made the mistake of not wearing a life jacket, find one and put it on;  2) if your boat remains afloat, try to reboard or climb onto it in order to get as much of your body out of the cold water as possible;  and 3) If you aren’t wearing a life jacket, look for one floating in the water or other floating items (coolers, oars or paddles, decoys, etc.) to help you stay afloat.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information on marine hardware and on how to survive a boat capsizing.

Watch or related video on Marine Hardware below

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via What to Do if You’re Capsized, if Your Boat Sinks or Floats Away or if Someone Falls Overboard

Your Marine Products Analysts Help You to Find Your Way Around Those Icy Waters

Raritan Engineering would like to keep you posted on marine products and also wants to show you the ropes for sailing in Siberia’s icy waters.

The otherworldly landscape of flat ice and consistent breeze makes Russia’s Lake Baikal in southern Siberia and ideal ice-sailing destination.

At over 5,000 feet deep, Lake Baikal is the deepest lake in the world and the largest by volume, holding approximately 20 percent of Earth’s unfrozen fresh water, more than all the Great Lakes combined. The lake formed from a rift valley in the heart of Siberia 25 million years ago. 

Proper ice sailing is best performed on smooth ice with consistent winds, conditions most often found along the so-called Ice Belt, between 40 and 50 degrees N. With its dry climate and extremely long winters, Baikal is basically ice-sailing nirvana. The vast landscape is raw, remote and unspoiled. It’s far off the grid. 

Because of such high speeds, conducting safe races is of the utmost importance. If a boat capsizes, hits a hole in the ice, or smashes into something, the skipper gets ejected and slides across the ice like a curling stone. 

Your Marine Products Experts Want You to Avoid Midrace Collisions While Out On the Frozen Water

Your marine products professionals know that to prevent midrace collisions, racers line up side by side, with half the fleet required to go left and the other half right. Courses are typically windward/leeward, with exclusion zones around the buoys to prevent kamikaze layline approaches. 

Sailing on the East Siberian Sea, this is the coldest day of our journey. The water temperature is 0 degrees, with only the salt in the water keeping it from freezing. But it is the humidity which is the problem as almost everything outside the pit is frozen: the deck, the shoots, ropes, sails, mast, camera, etc.

Most of our weather instruments at the top of the mast do not work, so we can only depend on the GPS and the digital weather models instead. 

On the satellite pictures we can see that we are very near to the ice edge. So we are very carefully and check the radar in a frequent manner. When we did see the ice edge, it was a big white stripe at the horizon with no end. 

I journeyed to Baikal to shoot a Waterlust film about how ice sailors are uniquely sensitive to Earth’s climate. As a scientist, I’m fascinated by their perspectives; many have been competing for three decades. The dramatic reduction in sailable ice throughout Europe during this time has greatly affected the sport, and the creep of global warming means that many sailors must travel farther north and east to find good ice.

Visit us at http://raritaneng.com/ and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on marine products and on how to successfully manage the icy waters of Siberia.

via Sailing Siberia

via Sailing in Freezing Water Near Ice Edge

marine heads analysts fishing tips
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Your Marine Heads Professionals Turn You Into a Master Fisherman

Raritan Engineering Company keeps you informed about marine heads and these four amazing fishing tips.

Assume the Position: Two boats get in position around a rock jetty, fishing both the point and steep drop-off. Not all passes are this calm and uncrowded, especially on the weekends.

If inlets and passes are the main thoroughfares for game fish to and from the ocean, jetties represent that one exit with all the restaurants. Rocky breakwaters are a veritable buffet table for species like striped bass, flounder and redfish. Even with pesky boat traffic, ocean swells and nearby shoals, these pervasive fishing structures remain popular for boat and shore fishermen. I went to five experts to learn how they avoid common jetty blunders and out-fish their close-quarter compatriots.

Don’t Let Your Presentation Stray from the Rocks

Even when fishing off the jetty, keep your presentation close to the structure for more hookups.

Capt. Alan Pereyra, of Topp Dogg Guide Service in Galveston, Texas, targets the jetties of the Galveston Ship Channel all year long for a variety of species. The Ship Channel is one of three cuts into the Galveston system, the other two being Rollover and San Luis passes.

“In the summer we’ll catch redfish, speckled trout, sheepshead, black drum, Spanish mackerel and sharks,” he says. 

Depending on the tide strength, Pereyra might use a kayak anchor in light current to hold the boat in place. “For heavy current,” he says, “I’ll drop a Danforth boat anchor 20 to 30 feet from rocks, then let [rode] out to position the back of the boat close to the rocks for my customers.”

Your Marine Heads Experts Suggest That You Follow These Casting Tips

Once at the rocks, he’ll use light setups with live shrimp for a ­natural presentation. “I want the bait to flutter down toward the bottom as it flows with the current,” says Pereyra.

Don’t Handcuff Yourself to a Single Bait Species

Your marine heads specialists and most captains strongly recommend casting near the rocks.

Having a variety of baitfish in the livewell can be paramount to enticing the bite, says Capt. Jared Simonetti of Clearwater, Florida. He regularly fishes the passes from Anclote Key to the Skyway Bridge for snook in the summer months.

“During the incoming tide, I’ll use leader as light as 30-pound-test and free-line the baits along the jetty,” he says. 

“These baits I send to the bottom using weighted rigs with heavier 50- to 60-pound leader,” he says. Simonetti wants the resilient baits to get down to the staging snook when the water ­visibility drops.

Don’t Forget the Jigs

“I call it the best rock pile on the coast,” says Capt. Trevor Smith of ProFishNC Charters, referencing Masonboro Inlet’s pair of jetties. 

“On the last two hours of the ­outgoing, when the bait dumps out with the backwater tide, I’ll use 3- to 4-ounce 5-inch-long metal jigs,” says Smith. 

Red drum and cobia are available in the springtime, with May to June hot for cobia, says Smith. August to October brings an influx of bull reds.

Don’t Stop Fishing When the Sun Goes Down

Stripers attract fishermen in droves to the jetties each spring and summer. Stay out after the sun sets and experience an even better late-night bite.

Delaware’s Inner Wall and Outer Wall skirt Cape Henlopen at the southern cape of Delaware Bay. The Harbor of Refuge Light sits atop the outer breakwater, while the East End Light marks the inner breakwater. 

Capt. Chuck Cook, of First Light Charters in nearby Lewes, Delaware, heads to these hot spots when the moon shines bright at night. “Bluefish take over in the evening and morning hours, but it’s a 100 percent striped bass bite at night,” he says. 

Visit us at http://www.raritaneng.com/ and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information on marine heads and on these four amazing fishing tips. 

via Jetty Fishing Tips

Your Marine Parts Specialists Share Amazing Tips on Efficient Sailing Teamwork

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how teamwork is needed for sailing success.

Your marine parts experts know that sailing and teamwork are crucial. Last Friday to Saturday I had the good fortune of being invited to crew on my friend Mark Hansen’s boat Sweet Lorraine (a beautiful J-145) in the 2012 Vineyard race.  The course starts near the Stamford Harbor, goes up to the Buzzard’s Bay Light Tower and then returns south of Block Island all the way to Stamford for a total length of about 238 nautical miles.  We are the rightmost boat in the picture below, taken shortly after the start.

The boat parts for less professionals know that the crew consisted of extremely experienced and successful sailors including several national/world champions in their respective boat classes.  I on the other hand have very little race experience and even my total sailing experience was a tiny fraction of that of the rest of the crew.  

First, it is tremendously useful to check your ego at the gate (the opening in the lifelines for getting aboard).  Your cheap boat parts analysts know that despite their tremendous individual accomplishments everyone did whatever was needed at the moment to help move the boat forward.  

Second, a clear division of labor makes everyone on the team effective.  On a crew everyone has a position at any one time (positions may rotate). The responsibilities for each position are well defined. 

Your Marine Parts Analysts Discuss How Good Communication is the Key

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts source and on why teamwork is needed for sailing success at Raritan Engineering.

Third, your marine parts source specialists understand that communication is the lifeblood of a team.  There is a nearly constant flow of information on the boat that enables team members to make the right local decisions. For instance at one point the wind was quite gusty and one team member announced incoming gusts letting both the helm and the sail trimmers adjust accordingly. 

Fourth, recover quickly from errors. Your marine supplies experts say that when something goes wrong on a boat, there’s no time to sulk.  Instead the problem needs to be fixed or it will generally get much worse.

Fifth, don’t get bent out of shape. Sometimes on a boat somebody will yell, especially when something is going wrong or about to go wrong and it is important to pay attention quickly. 

It was a terrific experience and I will make sure to apply some of the team lessons in working with our portfolio companies.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on why teamwork is needed for sailing success. 1) It is tremendously useful to check your ego at the gate (the opening in the lifelines for getting aboard;  2) a clear division of labor makes everyone on the team effective;  and 3) communication is the lifeblood of a team.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine parts, marine parts source, marine parts depot, and on why teamwork is needed for sailing success. 

via Sailing and Team Work

Marine Hardware
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Your Marine Hardware Analysts Discuss How Boat Buying Can Really Be Inexpensive

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hardware experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how buying your first boat isn’t as expensive as you think.

Your marine hardware specialists know that in some instances, you can buy a new boat financed for around $250.00 a month, like a car.

Boats provide tax deductible and cost effective second homes. Interest on a boat loan can be deducted if the boat has a galley, berth and head.

Visit a boat show to see what boating products are available and line up the best deals. 

Maintenance

Boat, trailer, and motor maintenance can be as simple as a freshwater wash down aftereach use and keeping them covered between adventures, helping to keep maintenance costs at bay.

Costs for routine maintenance vary by region, such as oil changes and winterizing, expect to pay what you would for your car on an hourly basis.

Check Out These Affordability Myths and Tips

The best two days of your life is the day you buy a boat and the day you sell it.

The best two days of your life come every weekend when you take the boat out with family and friends!

Why? Dealers want to sell boats, and they’ll be happy to work with you on special offers and the best deals to get you the boat of your dreams. 

Go to http://www.raritaneng.com/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine hardware and on how buying your first boat isn’t as expensive as you think.

Any boater will tell you, boating is the last great thing they’d give up if their budget were unexpectedly restricted. That says a lot about its value.

I can’t afford a boat.

Your marine hardware professionals know that you can finance a boat, just like a car and often for much longer terms. — in fact, you can own a new boat for as little as $250 month!* In 2012, the average retail price of an outboard boat was $20,387. 

Loans under $25,000 are based on 7.5% for 12 years.*

Boats provide tax deductible and cost effective second homes. Interest on a boat loan can be deducted if the boat has a galley, berth and head.*

Boat insurance is too expensive.

Boat insurance costs vary by boat length and type, cost of the boat and level of coverage and area of operation. It’s easy to get a quote from your current agent or compare rates online.

You can kill two birds with one stone, improve boating skills and reducee the cost of marine insurance premiums by taking a boater’s education course.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on buying your first boat and how it’s not as expensive as you think. 1) In some instances, you can buy a new boat financed for around $250.00 a month, like a car;  2) boats provide tax deductible and cost effective second homes. Interest on a boat loan can be deducted if the boat has a galley, berth and head;  and 3) You can kill two birds with one stone, improve boating skills and reducee the cost of marine insurance premiums by taking a boater’s education course.

Learn more at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have more information on marine hardware and how buying your first boat isn’t as expensive as you think.

via Buying a Boat Can Be Affordable

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Marine Parts Depot Specialist Helps You Enjoy Your First Boating Experiences

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts depot professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to endure the bumps of being a rookie sailor.

New to sailing? Let us help you master the basics with these handy sailing tipsand instructions for beginners. You can also read our sailboat buying guide and watch videos on sailing, plus compare sailboat brands to find the right one for you. 

  • Choose calm, uncrowded waters If you’re just starting to master sailing basics and learn how to sail, then one of the most important beginner sailing tips to remember is to practice in ideal conditions of light winds and low traffic. 
  • Choose a small boat to learn how to sail It’s easier to learn how to sail with fewer lines and sails.
  • Begin on a boat rigged with one sail Similar to the above, beginning on a boat that’s rigged with just one sail will make learning sailing basics easier and less complicated. 
  • Follow sailing basics for safety Your marine parts depot experts feel that there are certain sailing basics for safe boating that should go without saying, no matter what your level of expertise.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/catagory-pages/replacement-parts/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts depot and on how to avoid mistakes as a rookie sailor at Raritan Engineering.

  • Research tide, wind and weather conditions. Check the weather forecast so you can be prepared for whatever the weather might bring. Be sure to bring along adequate provisions, clothing and basic weather gear as needed.
  • Become familiar with sail control The best sailors are the ones who are able to adjust sail settings to take the best advantage of different wind and water conditions. 
  • Capsize on purpose. This may seem like one of the oddest beginner sailing tips we could suggest, but it’s better to practice how to handle a capsized sailboat within a controlled environment, as opposed to an uncontrolled one.
  • Respect the boom Some of the most common sailing injuries are a result of not being aware when the boom is about to swing. One of the most important beginner sailing tips to always remember for both passengers and crew is to be conscious and respectful of the boom at all times. 
  • Learn basic sailing terms. Before you venture out on your first trip, be sure to acquaint yourself with basic sailing terms. 
  • Practice makes perfect. Don’t try to teach yourself all the sailing basics. Invest in a good sailing course, research guides and books, and learn from friends with experience.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to avoid early mistakes as a rookie sailor. 1) Choose calm, uncrowded waters;  2) choose a small boat;  3) begin on a boat rigged with one sail;  and 4) respect the boom.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on marine parts depot.

via Beginner Sailing Tips

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Your Marine Products Specialist Shares How to Dock Your Boat

Raritan Engineering Company your marine products specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding boat docking tips.

Your marine products experts know that we can’t cover everything about boat docking in one sitting, but I think you’ll be surprised at how many of the basic principles of close quarters maneuvering are embodied in the example docking which I will be discussing shortly.

That brings up another important point. Learning to marine dock is done on the water, in our boats, not by reading about it here. Book learning and good teaching are important, (I would say crucial), and allow us to focus our minds more quickly and clearly than just by using the trial and error method.

Port-side-to — a docking dissected

For the present purposes, I’m going to assume calm marine conditions, and not factor in the effects of wind. Wind is probably the hardest thing to contend with, when docking a boat.

What’s your angle?

Your marine ice makers experts know that the first thing to notice is that this boater is coming in at an angle. This makes it much easier to aim for a particular spot, and to bring the boat in close to the dock without scraping.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice makers and on boat docking tips at Raritan Engineering.

Marine Products Professional Sees the Importance of Learning to Dock Your Boat

Coasting and the power turn

Secondly, think about what throttle setting you would use at the beginning of the approach. However, coasting is when “steerage”, the ability to steer, is at its minimum, because either i) there is no discharge current from the propeller to amplify the effect of the rudder, or ii) with inboard/outboards, most of the steering “authority” simply vanishes when the transmission is in neutral.

Keep up the momentum

The next thing the boater will do, as the dock draws nearer, is to start to turn the boat. However, this is also about the time that he or she wants to decelerate to a stop, in reverse gear. While slowing down, the vessel may be hard to steer.

Fortunately, boats in motion have momentum: once in motion, they tend to continue in motion, and once turning, they tend to continue to turn. This sometimes confounds the less skilled skipper, and yet momentum is exactly what to use when all other steering options fail, even for products purchasing experts. At just what point to turn, and how hard and for how long, I cannot say.

A walk in the dock

One final thing: it is very common for propellers to thrust asymmetrically, more on one side than the other, and in some boats the effect is often especially strong in reverse gear. The proper marine products are also needed to enjoy your traveling.

It’s because of this effect that we are discussing specifically port-side-to docking. Right hand propellers walk the stern to port, in reverse (a minority of propellers are “left hand” – for them, this whole discussion is a mirror image).

Conclusion

There is no conclusion to boat docking or in buying the right products. I have yet to hear the final word, and I’ve probably discussed and studied it more than most. Even if this port-side-to docking were all there was to know (and it’s not, it’s just the barest beginning), one could still spend a lifetime honing and refining the skills and techniques it requires.

So don’t forget these helpful points on learning how to dock your boat. 1) Know your angle;  2) know how to handle coasting and the power turn;  3) keep up the momentum;  and 4) the walk in the dock.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine products, marine ice makers, marine parts depot, and boat docking tips.

via Boat Docking – An Introduction

How Does a Marine Toilet Work?New Fresh Head

TIRED OF ROTTEN EGG SMELL OR USING YOUR SHOWER HEAD TO FLUSH YOUR MARINE TOILET?

The first manual marine toilet to utilize pressurized fresh water – eliminates calcium deposits in discharge hose

  • Footprint is a direct replacement for competitive models
  • No Thru Hulls necessary when installed with a holding tank
  • Low water use toilet
  • Available as Left hand side pump
  • PHII toilets can be retrofitted by purchasing the retro-fit pump

With a diaphragm type pump and telescopic handle, flushing is extremely easy. Owners choose how much water to use. A lever allows water into the bowl to pre-wet it for a better flush. A built-in freshwater backflow prevention includes a vacuum break. A lock-out feature stops backflow coming in through the discharge when not in use.

Choose Your Marine Toilet Here: http://raritaneng.com/catagory-pages/choosing-your-marine-toilet/

Comparison of Macerating Toilets vs. Vacuum Marine Toilets

Macerating Toilets vs. Vacuum Marine Toiltes

There are several beliefs in marine products market about vacuum and Macerating Toilets. Some of these beliefs are true and some are myth.

Let us look at the how both technique satisfy basic toilet engineering functions:

Evacuation of all solids and liquid in one flush:

Vacuum toilet: Stored vacuum is applied to the bowl by opening a valve by paddle or electric. Pressure differential between atmosphere and vacuum pushes water and solids towards the cavity behind the valve. Bowl evacuates quickly in 2 to 3 seconds. As soon as air enters the bowl throat, vacuum drops rapidly. This evacuation technique make a loud noise associated with sudden pressure changes and reduced pipe sizes.

When user closes the valve, suction of the diaphragm vacuum pump is applied to the content of the cavity below valve. Solids and water and air start to move towards pump thru long hose between bowl and pump.

Pressure differential between atmosphere and vacuum accelerate water and solids during initial application of vacuum. Water and air move more rapidly than solids. In order to further accelerate water and solids pipe size is reduced after valve cavity. This sudden change in volume causes more velocity for water and solids and some breakdown of solid from bigger chunk to smaller chunk. After the valve is closed, suction of the vacuum pump moves air and water towards the pump faster than solids. Hence due to lack of positive pressure and water, there is a tendency for solids to splatter on the walls of hose and stay there till next flush.

Once suction of the pump had displaced all the air from hose and valve cavity to builds a preset vacuum level, pumps shuts off. This means pumps continue to run for 45 to 60 seconds after toilet use with typical diaphragm noise. If there is any slight leak in the hose connection or debris caught between valve seat and bowl throat, pump will turn on itself as vacuum drops. This may be an annoying if it happens in the night time.

Due to vacuum, spattered sewage on the hose wall is decomposing under anaerobic environment. Anaerobic odors include a wide range of compounds, most notoriously the reduced sulfur compounds (e.g. hydrogen sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and methanethiol), volatile fatty acids, aromatic compounds and amines. Since system is under vacuum, it is unlikely that these odor producing gases escape thru hose. However these odors may be a problem at discharge side of the vacuum pump or during the flush cycle when vacuum level drops to almost zero. Due to notorious sulfur odors, some manufacturers only recommend special odor resistance hose for their vacuum system, increasing cost.

Macerating Toilet: Suction of the pump begins evacuation of bowl. Since pump is normally flooded with water at the beginning of the cycle, suction is powerful and draws solids and water from bowl cavity similar to vacuum toilet without loud popping noise. Most of the Macerating Toilets on the market are centrifugal pumps hence runs much quite than rubber impeller type. There is some gurgling noise similar to house toilets at the end of evacuation.

Suction of the pump is continuous and does not drops as stored vacuum does. Solids are macerated into very fine particles and send thru discharge at much higher velocity than vacuum toilet. Also since particles are smaller and have water as carrier, sewage move further into hose as compared to vacuum

End of the cycle pump stops, noise stops. There is no mysterious running of pump due to leaks or lake of vacuum. Power draw is measure by amps multiply by time. The macerator pump may draw more amps but draws less power compared to vacuum pumps.

Small macerated waste in the hose decomposes in aerobic environment. Aerobic byproducts of gases are odorless co2 and water. This means that a good quality rubber hose is all needed for system, no special odor resistance expensive hose is required.

The macerator pump eliminates waste clog in the hose or holding tank system as well as rinsing of bowl surfaces to remove all stains.

Part 2 of “Comparison of Macerating Toilets vs. Vacuum Marine Toilets” will be coming up soon!

Visit us at: http://raritaneng.com/catagory-pages/choosing-your-marine-toilet/ for more details on marine products.


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Boat Cleaning Products Professional Suggests The Best Way to Learn How to Read Nautical Charts

Raritan Engineering Company your boat cleaning products specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding learning how to read nautical charts.

Your boat cleaning products experts as well as many recreational boaters in small boats don’t consider it important to have charts onboard. Bad idea, even if you are just operating on your local lake. Perhaps you are not yet a boat navigator, but a chart onboard allows you to compare what you are seeing with what you should be seeing and can help you keep your bearings.

I did an instructor’s clinic a year or so ago on Lake Lanier in Georgia. This is a huge lake north of Atlanta. The school that hosted the clinic had to borrow a few boats and products from another location on the lake and several of the instructor candidates volunteered to move the boats.

Nautical charts are different from maps in that they specifically depict water areas, while maps concentrate on land area, roads, landmarks, etc. Land areas and features on boat charts are sketchy and are noted only for their interest to the boater.

Several of our visitors (that includes you Judy, in your brand new spiffy boat) have asked for a tip on reading nautical charts so we thought we would take a “non-navigators” trip from the Shark River out to the Atlantic, down the Jersey Shore, in the Manasquan Inlet and down the Intracoastal to Ortley Beach.

Important tips:

  • Study your chart thoroughly.
  • Look at the position from which you will start and visually follow along the course you wish to take.
  • Look for “notes” – water depths, obstructions (especially under water), bridges, power lines or any other unusual items that may be a hazard to your progress.
  • Make a note of each of these on a separate piece of paper.

Boat Cleaning Products Analyst Continues Discussion on Learning How to Read Nautical Charts

Your marine holding tanks experts using the Shark River detailed inset, let’s assume that we are departing the Municipal Boat Basin on the south side of Shark River Island. We can see from the chart note that we have a controlling width of 50 feet and 7.5′ depth from the Boat Basin to the jetty channel. The channel then widens to 100 feet with a depth of 18 feet.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine holding tanks and how learning how to read nautical charts at Raritan Engineering Company.

As we proceed toward the Atlantic, our first concern will be the boat power lines and two bridges that we will encounter.

The power lines have a clearance of 31 feet so we are okay in our small cuddy cabin cruiser. The first bridge has a horizontal clearance of 50 feet and a vertical clearance of 8 feet. The second bridge has a horizontal clearance of 50 feet and a vertical clearance of 13 feet.

Once we have cleared these first two bridges we will be passing the Belmar Basin on the right and the Shark River CG on the left. We then will traverse another bridge with a horizontal clearance of 90 feet and a vertical clearance of 15 feet. Once again, we are okay as we finish cleaning, and as we pass under the bridge.

We are now approaching a FL R 4sec 33ft 4M “2” HORN marker and a FL G 4sec 10ft 4M “1”. What do these series of letters and numbers mean? Simply put, we will be passing, on our port side, a flashing (FL) red (R) lighted buoy that flashes (at night) every four seconds (4sec), which is 33 feet tall (33ft), can be seen for 4 miles (4M), is marked with the number 2 (“2”), and is equipped with a horn.

As we proceed south following the 30 foot contour line and watching our depth finder can enjoy the view of the beach. From this point, you now have the Manasquan Inlet entrance markers in site, especially after finishing cleaning. (Click to see enlarged chart) You will turn west to enter the Inlet between the FL R 4sec 30ft 5M “4” and the FL 6sec 35ft 15M HORN.

Once inside the inlet we will just follow the channel with a depth of 8.5 feet until we reach R”2″ Fl R 4sec marker. This is where the channel begins to narrow until we are filtered into the very narrow channel at marker C”3″ just before the first bridge we see returning from sea.

Even though the channel now starts to enter a physically wider area of the Manasquan River, and after you finish cleaning, you note that the channel is marked more frequently. This is because the water is very shallow (1- 1.5 feet in some areas) outside the channel.

Just after we have passed R N”6A” and C “7A” we turn south into the Point Pleasant Canal, which begins the ICW, keeping FL R”8″ to starboard. This products marker should have a yellow triangle indicating that it is also a marker in the ICW.

From here we are cautious and continually check our chart for markers and objects from which we can visually note our position – keeping red markers to starboard and green to port.

Although this was a boater-friendly trip covering only about 20 miles, hopefully you get the idea how important your nautical chart products can be in making your trips safer.

So don’t forget these helpful tips when learning how to read nautical charts. 1) Study your chart thoroughly;  2) Look at the position from which you will start and visually follow along the course you wish to take; and 3) Make a note of each of these on a separate piece of paper.

Raritan Engineering has more information on boat cleaning products, marine holding tanks, marine sanitation device, and on how to learn to read nautical charts.

via Chart Reading 101

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