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Your Macerating Pump Professionals Share Great Ways to Stay Safe When Checking Out Your Boat

Raritan Engineering your macerating pump specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to stay safe while inspecting your boat during the winter.

Your macerating pump manufacturers share how “boating safety” usually means preventing injuries or accidents while on the water. Boats in winter storage have some unique safety concerns for boat owners who make periodic checkups over the long winter season. Here are five tips from the BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water to help boaters stay safe while visiting the boat this winter.

1. Injuries from ladder falls can be severe but are preventable. When using a ladder to climb aboard your frozen boat, be sure it is firmly planted, secure it with a line to avoid shifting, and have someone hold the base. 

2. Don’t trust the nonskid to do its job. Nonskid decks are slippery when covered by snow or encrusted with ice. Brush away any buildup on the deck where you plan to step, and always hold onto something, just as you would if you were underway. 

3. Snow and ice are heavy. One square foot of dense, wet snow can weigh more than 20 pounds, so use caution when going underneath a tarp or winter cover that’s loaded with snow. 

4. Check your jack stands for proper support. Jack stands or blocking can shift as the boat gets laden with snow and ice, or due to repeated freeze/thaw cycles. Never adjust jack stands yourself. 

5. Trailer boat frames should be supported at the rear cross beam. This prevents the tongue from lifting off the ground like a seesaw when climbing aboard from the stern.

Regular maintenance to keep your boat safe and complying with the legal obligations when it is on the water should ensure a first-time pass.

Importance of Safety During Boat Inspections

Macerating pumps can be seen here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

However, preparing your boat before its examination will pay off and success and safer boater should be your reward.

Firstly, will the examiner need to see any documentary evidence about a component’s manufacturing standard e.g. engine hoses manufactured to standard ISO 7840. Can you have it ready?

In addition to the advice on the page called Preparing for examination, we have the additional advice arising from the changes introduced in January 2013 for examinations on privately-owned, privately-managed boats:

Discuss your LPG cylinder locker arrangements with your examiner in advance of the examination as this may require your attendance or you to make prior arrangements involving service agents.

Where a boat uses A.C. shore-power and other a.c. power sources, the following notes on connection leads should be taken into account –

  • If practicable and safe to do so, boat owners should disconnect shore-power, battery charging, and other power sources in readiness for the BSS examination;
  • Boat owners should make available the shore-power, battery charging or other power source leads for examination of type and condition.
  • Information about the location of the a.c. consumer unit should be made known to the examiner in advance of the BSS examination.

So don’t forget these great safety tips for doing your personal boat inspection during the winter. 1) Injuries from ladder falls are preventable;  2) don’t trust the non-skid to do its job;  and 3) check your jack stands for proper support.

Frenchman Sets New Sailing Record : The Two-Way

French skipper, François Gabart, waves aboard his 100-foot trimaran as he celebrates his world record off Brest harbor, western France, on Sunday. 

There is a new world record for sailing solo around the world: 42 days, 16 hours, 40 minutes and 35 seconds. If verified, it is more than 6 days faster than the previous record, set a year earlier.

French sailor François Gabart, aboard a 100-foot trimaran, set out on Nov. 4 to break the record held by countryman Thomas Coville. On Sunday, Gabart crossed the virtual finish between France’s northwest tip and Lizard Point in southwest England at 0145 GMT before turning homeward to Brest in northwestern France.

Making such a journey is a difficult feat. It involves tackling the cold and stormy Southern Ocean that rings Antarctica, all the while tending a high-performance sailing vessel at the edge of its performance envelope.

After reaching Brest, Gabart, 34, said he was “aching all over.”

“[It’s] been like that for weeks, weeks since a proper sleep – I can hardly go on,” he told reporters after making landfall at Brest.

“It was hard and I was on the very edge of things the whole time.”

Exhausted or not, Gabart managed to share a bottle of champagne with his shore crew.

“It hasn’t sunk in yet but I know it’s a great time,” he said.

Gabart’s record must be verified by the World Sailing Speed Record Council, which will scrutinize his vessel’s GPS data before signing off on the new record.

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via 5 Tips to Stay Safe When Checking Up on the Boat This Winter

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via Around The World In 42 Days: Frenchman Sets New Sailing Record