Your Macerator Toilet Distributors Give Suggestions On How to Prepare for the Winter Raritan Engineering your macerator toilet manufacturers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to get ready for winter sailing.

During my admittedly few winters above the frost-belt, I have only fond memories of the last few days of the season. And I’ve always admired those who didn’t let the tilt of the Earth dictate the way they arranged their days.

This month, Practical Sailor contributor Drew Frye reviews measures to take if you plan to extend your sailing through the winter.

Practical Sailor readers who have been with us for a few years are familiar with Frye’s work, much of which is carried out from the deck of his PDQ 32 catamaran.  The boat, as far as I know, has not spent a full winter out of the water since Frye bought it.

Frye’s climbing habit routinely makes its way into Practical Sailor’s pages. His past research into fiber lifeline chafe and elasticity in deck cordage drew directly from his own experience with climbing ropes.

Your macerator toilet experts discuss how a related pursuit that occupies Frye is the endless search for ways to reduce onboard weight. As the owner of a catamaran, he recognizes that for many sailors, every equipment upgrade presents an irresistible opportunity to shave extra pounds.

One of the finer pleasures of winter sailing is the solitude it affords. As Frye wrote when he first pitched the story, “It has always seemed a shame to me that the great majority of boats in the country are only used in the summer.

So don’t forget these important reminders while preparing for winter sailing. 1) Don’t let hidden chafe doom your efforts to ditch wire lifelines;  2) consider using lightly used climbing ropes if you are comfortable with it;  and 3) bring lots of hot beverages.

Sailing in winter sounds like a cold and tricky business – but if you take some simple precautions there should be nothing stopping you.

Who hasn’t looked enviously from the deck of their laid-up boat in a yard on a crisp, sunny winter’s day at a boat sailing gently by, a steaming mug of tea in the owner’s hand. In the right conditions, winter sailing can be a joy.

But winter weather windows can be small, and you need to act fast if you want to make the most of a day on the water. Your reward will be a low sun, flat water and deserted cruising grounds.

Here are some tips and tricks to make you and your boat winter-sailing ready.

1. Keep your tanks topped off
It’s worth filling up with fuel and water as often as you can in the winter: fuel berth opening hours are likely to be reduced, and hoses may freeze or the water supplies may be turned off to protect the pipes – which makes it tricky to refill your tanks!

2. Fuel tank
Another reason to keep your fuel tank topped up for winter is to reduce condensation. A full tank has much less empty surface area for it to form, and thus less chance of diesel bug forming, especially if you also use an anti-diesel- bug additive.

3. Engine
For boats left afloat in salt water, it’s unlikely that the temperatures will dip low enough to cause any water left in the engine to freeze, but it’s worth attending to if a particularly cold snap is forecast. Make sure the coolant is topped up with the correct mix of antifreeze, and if you’re really worried, run some antifreeze through the raw-water system.

4. Batteries
Starting a diesel engine from cold in winter temperatures will require more power than it does in the summer, so it’s worth making sure your batteries are topped up – either by a small solar panel, or by taking them home for a recharge now and then.

5. Bedding
If you’re keeping your bedding on board so you can make a quick getaway, consider storing it in a vacuum bag. These keep linen and duvets dry and mildew-free: the air can be sucked out with a 12V vacuum cleaner if you’re not on shore power.

Click here for more information regarding Raritan Engineering and macerating toilets. We are your #1 experts in marine sanitation supplies.

via Gearing Up For Winter Sailing

via 26 Tips For Winter Sailing