Marine Ice Makers Specialist Helps You to Get Your Boat Around Bridges 

Marine Ice Makers Specialist Explains How to Have a Pleasant Experience While Moving Around Bridges 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to move your boat around bridges. 

Your marine ice makers experts know that traveling the inland waterways can be a pleasant experience but can also bring some special challenges especially for larger boats and sailboats. Dealing with draw bridges takes some knowledge of how the system works and knowing what you are looking for, especially at night.

Nautical charts only tell you that there is a bridge and what the horizontal clearance (width) and vertical clearance (height) are, says your specialist of ice makers for boats. The vertical clearance is the one you are probably going to be most concerned with, i.e. will you fit under the bridge or will you have to open it?

You should consult your chart for the note on heights; most will show minimum vertical clearance at mean high water. That means if you are at the bridge at any time other than high tide, you should have more clearance than shown. (You’ll be able to tell exactly when you get there.)

Your marine parts depot specialists know that as you approach a bridge there are several thing that you should look for. You should check the right side of the bridge opening for the “clearance board”. Your ice maker replacement experts know that this will give you the minimum clearance, in feet, from the water level to the bridge structure.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts depot and on how to move your boat around bridges at Raritan Engineering.

Other things to look for as you approach the bridge is a blue sign with what looks like a telephone receiver with a lightning bolt through it. This will give you the radio frequencies that the bridge monitors (usually 16 and 13 or 9). It is customary, at least in most areas, to contact the bridge tender by VHF radio to request an opening, however, there is a sound signal that can be used.

Marine Ice Makers Expert Wants to Help You Do Your “Bridge Homework”

Another piece of information on the bridge will be its name. If you didn’t do your homework when you planned the trip you will need to know that name to call the bridge. It is not specific enough to just call out “bridge, bridge, bridge.”

On the bridge you will also find a white sign that shows the hours of operation and special operational procedures. You should note that some bridges open on demand year-round and some only open on demand during certain parts of the year.

You may also find regulatory signs on bridges with information on speed limits or other warnings. In many cases speed limits may change at a bridge so be careful to heed these regulatory signs. Marine ice makers for sales analyst know that the bridge structure makes a great place to set up a marine speed trap.

While waiting for the bridge to open be aware of your position and make sure that current is not carrying you into the bridge. I remember sitting behind a sailboat a few years ago waiting for the bridge to open. I guess the skipper of the sailboat took the opportunity to go below for some reason.

Once the bridge is open proceed through with caution. Many times, if there is wind or current, you may find your steering affected. Keep a close eye out and try to anticipate any corrections that need to be made.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to move your boat around bridges. 1) Dealing with draw bridges takes some knowledge of how the system works and knowing what you are looking for, especially at night;  2) Other things to look for as you approach the bridge is a blue sign with what looks like a telephone receiver with a lightning bolt through it;  and 3) While waiting for the bridge to open be aware of your position and make sure that current is not carrying you into the bridge.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine ice makers, marine parts depot, marine products, and on how to move your boats around bridges.

via Bridge Procedures