PH Super Flush Marine Toilet By Raritan Engineering

PH SuperFlush – The Power Is In the Design

As a premier manufacturer of marine products, Raritan Engineering Co. Inc, is proud to introduce its latest product offering, the PH SuperFlush. Our latest configuration helps customers easily switch from competitive models and begin taking advantage of the robust and dependable design of our world renowned PHII pump. Every unit is individually assembled and tested by hand in the USA.
•Upgrading to PH SuperFlush is fast and easy! Mounting base configuration matches the bolt pattern used on most competitive toilets.
•Clear the bowl with less strokes! Our robust double-action piston pump is 66% larger than competitive models making its use quick, easy and efficient.
•Trouble free operation! Proprietary full size 1½” joker valve is specially designed to maintain pump performance.

Additional benefits include:

-Effortless pumping! Powerful telescopic lever style
handle makes pumping a breeze.

-Superior strength! Our engineered polymer pump construction is the strongest on the market.

-No more slamming seats! Capable of locking the seat in place while boat is rocking.

At Raritan, we offer dependability where it counts.
Be Sure To Get Your PH SuperFlush Marine Toilet At Raritan Engineering

Off My Dock: One In a Million

Your Marine Hose Specialists Share Great Tips For Lightning Storm Survival

Raritan Engineering your marine hose distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding safety during lightning storms.

Your marine hose suppliers discuss how they say lightning never strikes twice, but when it strikes my good friend Chuck Larson, the story gets told over and over again, and never gets old.

And the odds are actually 1 in 1.083 million in any given year, according the National Weather Service. Sounds like a long shot, but in an 80-year life span those odds increase to 1 in 13,500, which seems more probable. 

In fact, an impoundment of the Little Tennessee River was the site of the lightning strike that nailed Chuck some 20 years ago. Chuck and his cousin, Andy, and two bikini-clad friends were back in a cove when they heard thunder and rightly decided to head for home port, but when they wheeled out onto the main lake, they discovered the storm was almost upon them and coming from the direction of home. 

Many power boaters like to think that they’ve got the speed to simply outrun or get out of the way of lightning storms, or they figure they’re safe if they go boating only when it’s clear and sunny. That’s an attitude aided by the low odds of a boat being struck by lightning, which BoatU.S. pegs at about one out of 1,000 boats in any given year. No worries, right, mate?

Check out our marine products choices here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Wrong. Engines can malfunction; big lightning storms can leave no room to escape; sunny mornings can turn into dark, threatening afternoons. If yours is the only boat in the area during a lightning storm, the odds of being struck go way up, leaving you and your crew vulnerable to millions of volts raining down from the skies. 

Timing

A strategy of boating only on sunny, cloudless days may work well in places like Idaho and California, but that would mean almost never using the boat in places such as Florida, Louisiana and much of the Midwest. 

Absolutely, boaters should track VHF, Internet and television weather reports and make responsible decisions about whether to go boating depending on the likelihood of lightning storms. Short-term forecasts can actually be fairly good at predicting bigger storms, but small, localized storms might not be reported. 

A storm that builds directly overhead might be less obvious until those pretty white clouds that were providing some nice shade moments ago turn a threatening hue of gray as rain dumps on you and the wind starts to howl or, worse yet, boom with thunder and lightning that are right on top of each other. 

Write the Check!

On many levels, robust insurance coverage plays a huge role in your lightning-protection plan. Knowing how to avoid lighting storms and read the weather are certainly important, being ready for action in the event of a storm or strike is crucial, and an upfront investment in lightning protection can lessen destruction. 

Take it from a luxury trawler owner who sustained more than $1 million in damage from a strike: “Boat insurance turns out to be the best investment we have made in the past 10 years!” he said. “We will never again grumble about writing a check for an insurance premium.”

So don’t forget these important reminders when staying safe from lightning storms. 1) Don’t assume you have the speed to outrun a lightning storm;  2) you should track VHF, Internet and television weather reports and make responsible decisions about whether to go boating depending on the likelihood of lightning storms;  and 3) buy good insurance.

If it seems every American is doing dragon boating, you may be right. But it all started in Philadelphia

If you haven’t seen an actual dragon boat by now, chances are you’ve heard of it. Or you’ve seen pictures. Or you have a friend on a team who posts her medals on her Facebook feed.

But what most people don’t know is that the ancient Asian water competition, involving boats adorned with dragon heads, 10 pairs of paddlers, a steersperson, and a drummer, is exploding across the United States. Or that Philadelphia — where American dragon boating got its start — remains at the crest of the sport.

 
At the same time, the country’s most elite dragon boat paddlers – Team USA – are training for the world championship starting Oct. 18 in Kunming, China, with Philadelphians heavily represented on the team and its coaching staff.

There are no national statistics on dragon boat participation, because many of the festivals attract community groups or companies for short-term team building or charity drives. But places as far flung as Dexter, Ore.; Minocqua, Wis.; and Norfolk, Va., are touting first, second, or third annual dragon boat festivals. In July, the Cooper River held its second annual event, and Bucks County held its third on Sept. 23.

Among those recently drawn into the sport is Lyudmila Kuznetsova, a Philadelphia dentist who first tried paddling in May with the Dragon Ladies, a Main Line team. After a handful of practices, the Dragon Ladies raked in a women’s division gold medal at Philadelphia’s Independence Dragon Boat Regatta in June.

“For me it was a chance to be on the water,” said Kuznetsova. She loves the exercise and the social aspects of being on a team that draws on newcomers to the region.

“Sport is a life-changer for most of us,” said Marks, who for 25 years headed Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts. After breast cancer in 1998 and a double mastectomy in 2006, she joined Against the Wind, the area’s first breast cancer team, founded in 2001. It will compete in July in Florence, Italy, in the international breast cancer dragon boat festival. Global interest is so great that registration closed a year before the event.

American dragon boating began in Philadelphia in 1983 after the Hong Kong tourist bureau asked USRowing to send a team, all expenses paid.

Robert McNamara, a cash-strapped young doctor in 1984, joined the team for the free trip, he said. Two years later, he was coach of Team USA. Since then, it has won more than 100 world championship medals, including 23 golds. It also holds world records in the 500 meter: 1 minute, 48 seconds for the men’s team; 1 minute, 53 seconds for the coed team.

McNamara is on the Schuylkill several mornings a week by 5:30 before going to his job of 30 years as chief of emergency medicine at Temple University’s Lewis Katz School of Medicine.

As for its growing popularity across the country, McNamara says, “Anybody can get in a dragon boat and survive. It’s a big enough boat that balance isn’t an issue. You get on the water with a lot of other people, and it’s a lot of fun.”

Purchase your marine hose here at Raritan Engineering.

We are your #1 expert in marine sanitaiton supplies.

via Off My Dock: One In a Million

via How to Survive Lightning Storms While Boating

via If it seems every American is doing dragon boating, you may be right. But it all started in Philadelphia


Marine Water Heaters Distributors at Raritan Share Ways to Install and Maintain Your Bilge Pump

Raritan Engineering your marine water heaters experts would like to share with you this week some great information regarding the ease of bilge pump installation.

The best bilge pump in the world won’t keep your boat dry if it’s not properly installed and maintained. While bilge pump installations are fairly straightforward—and definitely within the scope of DIY projects—there are several factors to consider (capacity, wire size, hose diameter, fuse size) before you begin, and there are some good rules of thumb to follow.

CHOOSING AN ELECTRIC PUMP

The first step is selecting the right bilge pump(s) for the job. We recommend installing two electric centrifugal pumps (preferably one with automatic water level sensor): a smaller pump mounted at the belly of the bilge to handle the incidental bilge water (rain, stuffing box drips, etc.) using minimum power and another pump mounted a few inches higher to handle bigger jobs. 

Capacity: For most mid-sized boats (30-35 feet in length), we’d recommend a 1,000-1,500 gallon-per-hour (GPH) pump for the primary and one with a capacity of about 2,000 GPH for the backup. 

When comparing output specs on multiple pumps, be sure the rating criteria are the same. New standards set by the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) require that compliant makers rate pump capacities so that they reflect real-world usage. The ABYC stipulates that pumps be rated with a head height (also called vertical lift) of 1 meter and a hose length of 3 meters, and with a head height of 2 meters and hose length of 6 meters. Head height is the vertical height of the hose outlet above the pump outlet. 

Key features: An automatic pump will rely on a water-level sensor such as a float switch to activate the pump. This can be a separate unit or one that is integral to the pump. This sensor should resist fouling and be easy to test for proper operation. 

INSTALLATION

The illustration above shows one recommended setup for automatic bilge pump installation.

Location: According to the ABYC, the pump inlet must be positioned so that bilge water can be removed when the boat is in a static position and when it is at maximum heel (ABYC H-22). The mounting location also should make it easy to service the pumps and to clean them, particularly their strainers.

When installing two electric pumps, the lower-capacity pump should have a built-in float switch, be mounted at the lowest point of the bilge, and be wired straight to the battery through a fuse. The higher-capacity pump is installed a few inches higher, but not directly above the smaller pump.

Plumbing: When plumbing an electric bilge pump, be sure the setup is designed to reduce head pressure as much as possible to maximize discharge capacity: use smooth hose sized to meet maker recommendations; keep hose runs as short as possible; and try to avoid bends, turns, and elbow fittings in the run. 

We Continue Talking About Easy Bilge Pump Maintenance

Your marine water heaters professionals talk about how the discharge line should rise steadily to the through-hull or loop. If there are any low spots in the run, water will pool there once the pump cycles off. This can create an airlock when the pump is activated again, and the pump likely will stall. 

Wiring: Use correct size wire and fuses: The proper wire size reduces voltage drop and properly fused wiring reduces risk of a locked rotor (a motor that’s trying to turn, but can’t) causing an overcurrent situation and potential fire hazard.

Consult the American Wire Gauge 3% voltage drop table (www.marinco.com/page/three-percent-voltage) to be sure you’re using large enough wire. 

For the fuse size, simply go by the pump maker’s recommendation, and you should be set. The fuse, per ABYC standards, should be installed within 7 inches of the power source.

Accessories: A few accessories to consider adding to the bilge pump system include a visual/audible bilge alarm, bilge switch, and a cycle counter. ABYC standards require an alarm on boats with enclosed berths. 

Automatic pumps should always be fitted with a readily accessible and clearly marked manual switch so that even if the owner isn’t around, anyone (crew, marina neighbors, or passersby) can locate and activate the switch when the need arises. 

If the larger-capacity pump has a float switch, we highly recommend connecting it to a bilge alarm (and alarm cut-off switch). That way, hopefully, the horn will get someone’s attention before the constant cycling of the pump drains your batteries. 

Two good references on bilge pumps and installing them are “This Old Boat” by Don Casey and Nigel Calder’s “Boatowner’s Mechanical and Electrical Manual.”

MAINTENANCE

Regular and frequent inspections of your bilge pumps are a must and should be included in the vessel’s overall preventative maintenance program. This helps you know when to replace worn or damaged components (bad float switches, deteriorated  hoses) before they fail. 

Keeping your bilge clean can be a hassle, but it doesn’t compare to the headache of a locked rotor or an impotent bilge pump in an emergency. 

So keep in mind these pointers when installing and maintaining your bilge pump. 1) The pump inlet must be positioned so that bilge water can be removed when the boat is in a static position;  2) when plumbing an electric bilge pump, be sure the setup is designed to reduce head pressure as much as possible to maximize discharge capacity;  and 3) This helps you know when to replace worn or damaged components (bad float switches, deteriorated  hoses) before they fail.

Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Arkup, the “avant-garde life on water” company, has designed a new luxury home that integrates solar on the roof and a newly approved lithium ion marine battery system. The main selling features are that it can rise with sea levels via jacks, withstand extreme weather, move as a regular electric propelled boat, and provide it’s own water plus – of course – electricity.

There are no specifications on the solar panels used – merely multiple notations that 30kW of panels can fit on the roof in 2,300 sq feet.

The systems are liquid or air cooled lithium ion battery kits. The individual battery packs are 5.7kW each and individual stacks go up to 137kWh. No where on the Arkup website it specific the exact number of units, however, they clearly state it is ‘customizable’ – so expect that the only limitation to stored power will be related to space.

The Orca system was recently approved by DNV GL – global ocean classification body – as being safe for maritime usage.

The Arkup is powered by an electric propulsion system – adding to Electrek’s electric boat collection. The system can move at up to 7 knots per hour with a range of 300 nautical miles. With its solar propulsion system – it could probably run indefinitely.

Two points from Arkup’s promotional material gives a feel for the market, in addition to luxury, that they’re aiming for:

Sustainable: Environmentally friendly, powered by solar energy, no fuel, zero emission, equipped with waste management, rainwater harvesting and purification systems, our living yachts are totally off-the-grid.

Resilient:  Made for all environments and designed to withstand category 4 hurricane winds, our livable yachts are equipped with a hydraulic self-elevating system to prevent from sea sickness and flooding.

Click here and see how we here at Raritan Engineering always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs. 

via Bilge Pump Installation and Maintenance Tips

via Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Your Macerating Pump Professionals Give Great Downrigger Tips For Your Next Fishing Trip 

Raritan Engineering your macerating pump distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to use downriggers to your success.

Your macerating pump suppliers talk about how fish often concentrate in a specific stratum of the water column, held there by food, temperature, and other conditions they find to their liking. This can challenge anglers who want to keep their trolling baits or lures in the zone. 

Follow Your Fish Finder

Use your fish finder to look for schools of bait and fish, as well as thermoclines that often mark as a steady line between the surface and the bottom. Any of these can signal the depth to set your lines. 

Test the Waters

Until you figure out at which level the fish are holding, run your downriggers at different depths. You can also stagger-stack two or more trolling lines on each ­downrigger by using adjustable line releases that clip onto the downrigger cable. 

Consider the Conditions

Don’t rely solely on the downrigger’s depth gauge, because boat speed and the speed/direction of the current can affect the actual trolling depth of your lure or bait. You can often observe the actual running depth of your gear on the fish-finder display and raise or lower the downrigger to get into the strike zone.

What is a downrigger & how do they work?

We pulled up on the reef at around 7 in the morning. It was a popular reef on the Gold Coast well known for its mackerel fishing. We were keen to try for a Spanish mackerel so had opted to forego the early morning bite period to try and catch some live bait that we intended to slow troll. We run 2 large live wells on our charter boat, RU4 ReeL, and they both had a good number of live slimeys swimming around in them, so we felt quietly confident even though the prime bite time was already over. 

We Continue Talking About the Benefits of Using Downriggers

How to Use Downriggers

What do they do?

Browse our macerator pumps selection here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

A down rigger is similar to an outrigger in that it places your bait where you want it away from the other baits or lures. An outrigger lifts your bait up to the surface and moves it out of the bubble trail created by your propeller and into clearer water. A Downrigger simply drops your bait down into the water column to a depth of your choice and as with an outrigger when a fish grabs the lure or bait your line pulls out of the release clip and your are thus able to fight your fish weight free and unhindered. 

How does it work?

Downriggers were originally used in large lakes to target trout and salmon. As we fisherman are an inventive mob, we eventually worked out that we could use them in other fisheries and they found there way into the saltwater. Whether they are used in fresh or salt the principle around their use remains the same. 

Once you have the line in the clip you will need to let the ball down progressively while controlling the line coming off your spool. This takes a bit of practice as the initial start up can yank the line off your reel with a sudden jolt. I apply a bit of finger pressure to the spool of my reel to ensure that I don’t get a tangle. 

When to use the Downrigger

You can catch just about anything on a Downrigger from snapper to marlin; and their uses are not limited to offshore fishing. On our charter boat we predominantly use them for targeting pelagic species like mackerel, cobia, marlin, and yellowtail kingfish; but snapper, various species of tuna and a variety of reef fish have been making up quite a respectable by-catch. 

The down rigger offers a very natural presentation and can also often tempt fish into biting that will refuse a similar bait that seems unnatural to them. 

What to use

You may have noticed that I keep referring to baits or lures when talking about down rigging. You can fish just about anything out of a down rigger either on anchor, on the drift or trolling. 

On our charter boat we use our Canon Downriggers quite closely in conjunction with our Humminbird sounders. You can clearly see the Downrigger ball on the sounder (if your transducer is mounted on the transom) so it can simply be a case of adjusting the depth of the ball to the depth that you are marking fish on your sounder. 

Downrigging is a technique that can catch you a lot of fish when others fail to produce. It is not the be all or end all of fishing techniques and as with everything will not always produce fish, but if you have never tried it or own one but don’t use it. It may well be worth the effort and you will be pleasantly surprised at the results.

So don’t forget these helpful benefits to using a downrigger on your next fishing trip. 1) You can catch just about anything on a Downrigger from snapper to marlin;  2) the down rigger offers a very natural presentation and can also often tempt fish into biting that will refuse a similar bait that seems unnatural to them;  and 3) downrigging is a technique that can catch you a lot of fish when others fail to produce.

Dolphin Tangled In Fishing Line Swims To Shore To Get Help

Folks out enjoying a day on this stretch of the Spanish coast last week likely never thought they’d end up saving a life — but that’s exactly what they did.

Inés Oliva Pérez was among a group of sunbathers on El Buzo beach, in El Puerto de Santa María, when she spotted a young dolphin stranding herself in the surf. Other people there noticed it too, and a small crowd began to gather at the waterline. But as the dolphin washed ashore, their curiosity about her surprise appearance soon turned to concern for her well-being; suddenly, it made sense why she might have approached them.

The dolphin’s mouth was tangled in fishing line, which she had no way of removing on her own.

Reserve your items here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via How to Use Downriggers

via Beginner’s Guide to Downrigger

via Dolphin Tangled In Fishing Line Swims To Shore To Get Help

Life is truly good for the crew of this Alerion 28 as they enjoy a quiet evening on the water

Electric Toilet Specialists at Raritan Discuss How to Get More Bang for Your Buck When Getting Lessons 

Raritan Engineering your electric toilets suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding great ways to get great coaching from a small budget.

Your electric toilets distributors talk about how not everyone can afford to have the top coach – or any coach – help them through their boat handling. Here are a few quick tips that can help you get the most out of your training sessions without shelling out the big bucks.

1.  Have a friend with a powerboat film your boathandling – Most of us have a friend or two with a powerboat and some free time. One of the easiest ways to get a look at your boat from outside is to enlist the help of a friend. 

2. Have your sail trimmers view trim from the powerboat – As an alternative to video taping your setup (or in addition to, depending on how much patience your friend has), have your sail trimmers observe from the chase boat for a legs to get a sense of what the sails look like from the outside. 

3. Combine your post-race of post-practice debrief with a competitor – Use the buddy system. If you have a friend sailing in your fleet, or a competitor that’s willing to talk through races with you, it can be helpful for both parties if you debrief about the day’s sailing. 

Your Electric Toilets Manufacturers Talk About Getting Good Quality Training At A Good Price

4. Have a crewmember time maneuvers with a stopwatch – Establishing a baseline by timing maneuvers is a good way to check yourself on performance. See your choice of electric toilets here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs. Once you know about how long a tack or jibe should take, you can always run against the clock to check to see how you are doing. 

5. Swap crewmembers around during a practice maneuvers – Moving crew members around will help everyone onboard get a better sense of what each position does. When your bow guy knows what to look for in the shape of the jib, he can provide better feedback to the guy grinding the headsail in at the back of the boat. 

So don’t forget these helpful pointers in getting the most of your boating lessons. 1) Have a friend with a powerboat film your boathandling;  2) have your sail trimmers view trim from the powerboat;  and 3) and combine your post-race of post-practice debrief with a competitor.

Lessons from a Long-Range Cruiser: What Tools To Take on Your Boat

We all learn from experience, or rather, we all should learn from experience. Here’s some good advice from Steve D’Antonio, who has a lot of experience cruising himself, as well as working on cruising boats as the former manager of a boatyard. The reality is that if you’re cruising offshore, you’ll have to be able to fix any problem yourself. D’Antonio’s been there, done that. 

First, he says, never leave the dock without reviewing your spare parts on board, particularly impellers, belts and fuel filters. Second, always have a good set of tools, including the most common hand tools, wrenches, sockets and screw drivers plus tools that are specific to the systems on your boat. And third, if all else fails, be able to improvise so you can jury rig a repair so you can get back home safely.

Order your marine toilet parts here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via 5 Tips for Better Coaching on a Beer Budget

via Photo

via Lessons from a Long-Range Cruiser: What Tools To Take on Your Boat

Competitive sailing is only part of what these great little designs have to offer: they are also perfect for just taking a spin on a sunny day: (clockwise from top) the J/70, Ensign, Flying Scot and Archambault 27

Your Macerating Toilet Distributors Talk About Finding the Ideal Daysailer for You 

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why many people love daysailers.

How would you describe the ideal daysailer? Or a daysailer at all for that matter? Your macerating toilet manufacturer talks about how the basic concept is simplicity itself. And yet, over the years the term “daysailer” has come to include boats spanning the length and breadth of yacht design.

Even the proper length of a daysailer, an aspect of small-boat design that might seem self evident, has become a subject of debate, as the “daysailer” concept has come to include boats with LOAs of 40 feet or more.

Recently, in a vain effort to impose some order on the concept, we decided to break up the universe of daysailers into six categories. Bring on the letters to the editor! We’d love to know what you think.

Traditional Under 20ft

Among the most beloved daysailers are those that hark back to an earlier age. Indeed, in some cases these are boats that have enjoyed production runs spanning generations. Chief among these would have to be the cute-as-a-button Beetle Cat, which has been in production since the 1920s in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Other more recent entries in this sub-genre include Marshall Marine’s catboat line, Com-Pac Yacht’s Picnic Cat and Sun Cat, Bauteck Marine’s Bauer line, the NorseBoat 12.5 and 17.5, and the Crabber 17, 22 and Shrimper at the small end of the Cornish Crabber line.

One-Designs

As the old saw goes, put any two sailboats within sight of one another, and you’ll inevitably have a race on your hands. However, a funny thing happened on the way to the finish line for a number of smaller designs originally conceived as racers: they also turned out to be great daysailers.

Other standouts include the 23-foot full-keel Ensign, Sandy Douglass’s Thistle and Flying Scot, W.D. Schock’s Lido 14, and the S&S-designed Lightning, originally created for racing on Skaneateles Lake in upstate New York.

Find your marine toilet of choice here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Another brand-new entry in this category is the Chinese-built FarEast 18, available in both a standard and souped-up “R” version, complete with retractable bowsprit. Then there’s the French-built Archambault 27. 

Modern Classics 

One of the most gratifying trends in modern yacht design has been the growing number of “modern classics” out there, with sprightly sheer lines, gorgeous overhangs, low topsides, and cutting-edge fin keels and spade rudders below the waterline.

If there’s a downside to these boats it is that they tend to be pricey, especially those including lavish amounts of teak and varnished mahogany topsides. Still, there’s no getting around how well those low narrow hulls, tall, powerful sailplans and deep high-aspect underwater appendages perform out on the water. 

Weekenders

Since the dawn of “yachting” as a pastime, there have been sailors who take an almost perverse delight in building tiny boats that not only sail well, but also have a place to bunk out—a daysailing sub-genre that is as active today as ever.

Do some of these heavier designs push your personal definition of a daysailer? So be it. Kudos to these boats and their designers for making sailors, and our readers in particular, stretch their minds a little.

Multihulls

And now for something completely different.

Multihulls have traditionally been difficult to pigeonhole, and that remains true when considering them as daysailers. Is the Hobie 16 beach cat a daysailer? Why not? Too wet? Not serious enough? 

No matter what the specific design, it would be hard to find a better class of boats for a day of sailing.

Family Boats/Trainers

Family boats and trainers are perhaps the toughest to categorize, given all the different shapes and sizes they come in. Nonetheless, we all know them when we sail them: boats that are both forgiving and have enough cockpit space to accommodate at least one or two passengers. 

Among those boats created for the express purpose of training new sailors, the Colgate 26, created by Steve Colgate and naval architect Jim Taylor, is probably the most noteworthy. 

In many ways, these small to midsize trainers are the boats that first come to mind when many people think of daysailers, and for good reason. They might not be the sexiest boats on the water, but they’re pretty and a lot of fun to sail. 

So don’t forget these great ideas for your next daysailer purchase. 1) Size doesn’t necessarily matter;  2) older models can be ideal as well;  3) just choose the one you want to be in. There is no wrong choice.

They sailed a Tall Ship from Nova Scotia to France, what’d you do on your summer vacation?

Having grown up in Newfoundland and Labrador, Megan Dicker is no stranger to the ocean. But, this year, she got to sail across it.

“At first, I was anxious,” Dicker explained. “I didn’t know if I should try, because it seemed like such a wild adventure. But, at the same time, just the thought of sailing across the Atlantic encouraged me [to go].”

The 45 young people worked with the crew, learning how to put up and take down sails, and navigation techniques. She said it was physically challenging at the beginning. “By the end of the trip, it was easy-peasy.”

Gulden Leeuw

The youth traveled from Halifax to France on the Dutch ship, Gulden Leeuw. (Emma Davie/CBC)

When they weren’t on watch or taking tasks, the youth listened to and learned from each other. They came from all walks of life, and from many different communities.

“It was a reminder that you can do anything you put your mind to,” said Dicker. “I already knew that we have power within ourselves. But, going on that trip, it kinda amplified that feeling.”

Choose your Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via The Six Categories of Daysailers, and Why We Love Them

via They sailed a Tall Ship from Nova Scotia to France, what’d you do on your summer vacation?

Melanie Neale

Raritan Toilet Macerator Manufacturers Give Great Tips for Finding a Trustworthy Broker When Selling Your Boat

Raritan Engineering your toilet macerator professionals would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to find the best broker to help you sell your boat.

However, for those who are looking to get the best price for their boat with minimal effort, a broker is usually a more sensible choice.

Before you choose a broker, here are some things to consider.

• A broker’s fee is always 10 percent upon the sale of the boat, but some offer more services than others for the same price. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted.

• Responsiveness. How quickly a broker responds to your inquiry is indicative of how they will respond to potential buyers. Give them 24 hours, and move on if they don’t respond or if they make excuses as to why they didn’t respond promptly. 

• Marketing. All brokers have access to Yacht World. Ask where else the broker will advertise your boat and expect to receive a written list of websites and print publications and social media. 

• Look at other listings. Ask a potential broker for links to some of their listings. If you don’t like the write-up, think the photos are shoddy, or if there isn’t enough information, move on.

• Comps. The average buyer and seller, despite what they might find perusing ads and looking at resources like BUC, do not have access to actual comps. Your broker does. In addition to knowing what is currently on the market, your broker should offer you information on how many similar boats have sold in your region recently, what they were listed at, how long they took to sell, and exactly what they sold for.

Your Toilet Macerator Experts Talk About How Finding a Good Broker Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated

• Paperwork, escrow, and protection during the closing process. Your toilet macerator specialists talk about how a broker will have an escrow account and will ask that all deposits be submitted to the account. The broker will have all the forms you need, and some even use programs like YachtCloser which simplify the process through e-signing. 

• Import duty. If you have purchased a foreign-built boat and plan to sell it in the US to a US citizen (regardless of your citizenship), import duty must be paid. Your yacht broker will help you find a customs broker. 

• Personality. You and your broker are forming a relationship, and chances are that you are already somewhat emotional about the sale of your boat. Your broker needs to understand this and be open and honest with you. 

So don’t forget these helpful suggestions when looking for a broker to help you sell your boat. 1) A broker’s fee is 10% after sale of the boat. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted;  2) ask a potential broker for links to some of their listings. If you don’t like the write-up, think the photos are shoddy, or if there isn’t enough information, move on;  and 3) make sure you can trust and get along with your broker.

Marina manager stole $2M by selling boats he didn’t own, authorities say

A convicted felon who managed a Jersey Shore marina stole more than $2 million from 13 people by illegally selling their boats, authorities said.

Denis Kelliher, 47, of Toms River, was indicted on counts of wire fraud, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Pennsylvania’s Eastern District said in a statement.

Kelliher, who worked at Trenton Marine in Toms River, used the money from the sale of the boats to pay off personal debts to associates, authorities said. He faces up to 20 years in prison and might have to pay restitution of $2,163,000 if convicted.

Kelliher ran a check-kiting scheme that caused a $7.6 million in bank overdraft fees and admitted he fraudulently obtained more than $600,000 in loans from two friends to pay down those fees.

Click here and learn more about macerating toilets and how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Choosing a Boat Broker

via Marina manager stole $2M by selling boats he didn’t own, authorities say

Manual Marine Toilets by Raritan Engineering

Raritan Engineering manufactures the most reliable manual marine toilets for boats. Raritan was the first company to use polymer material for PH manual marine toilets to solve the corrosion problems that came with toilets made from bronze parts. Since then, Raritan has continued to improve and introduce innovative solutions and features in manual marine heads. It is not uncommon for a boater to continue to operate Raritan PH series heads for over 20 years with little maintenance and care.

Current products such as PHII and PH super flush manual marine head and Fresh Head manual marine toilets are developed with modern day boaters in mind. These toilets require minimum maintenance, they last many years and are very efficient to flush solids and liquid. These toilets have features not common with other manual marine heads.

Manual Marine Toilets- Reliable and Low Maintenance!

These toilets are made especially for you. Be sure to buy your marine toilet from us at Raritan Engineering.

via Raritan Engineering

Your Boat Toilets Suppliers Share Great Ways to Remove Pesky Waterline Stains

Raritan Engineering your boat toilets manufacturers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to beat waterline staining.

Summer is here, and our routine maintenance chores now require some serious elbow grease. Our first impulse is to go for the super-strength acids that will take care of the hard growth as well as the stains. 

Over the years, Practical Sailor has reviewed several eco-friendly products that do a good job of descaling heat exchangers and removing barnacles. Barnacle Buster from Trac Ecological (Practical Sailor May 2007) and Rydlyme Marine from Apex Engineering (Practical Sailor March 2008) both dissolve calcium carbonate, the main ingredient in lime scale and shell.

Other products like Star brite Zebra Mussel and Barnacle Remover or MaryKate On & Off deal with shell and scale well, but they contain stronger concentrations of hydrochloric acid that give off toxic fumes and are beastly to work with. 

Green Cleaners

Even mild cleaners like lemon juice will remove hull wax.

The trouble with brown-yellow waterline stains is that they’re often made up of more than one problem—a combination, for instance, of algae stain, pollen, and tannic-acid stains, plus oil stain, all in a matrix of salt and strange oxides. 

We Continue Talking About How to Safely Remove Waterlines From Your Hull

Your boat toilets experts talk about how all but one contained oxalic, hydrochloric, sulfuric, or other acids, or some mixture of them, and all were rated Good or Excellent. This is not chemical rocket science. The overall Best Choice and Budget Buy was Spray Nine’s Boat Bottom Cleaner, a gel containing “multiple acids.” 

Most waterline stain removers use harsh acids to banish the brown funk. If the stain isn’t too bad, try cleaning it with concentrated lemon juice first. 

One way to reduce the work load is to stay ahead of stains by more regular sponging of the boot-top and waterline. A thorough buff-and-wax job using one of our top-rated hull waxes goes a long way toward keeping the waterline clean. If things start to get ugly, I’ll use milder “green” formulas that fared well in our tests, or any you might recommend. 

Don’t forget these great tips for removing pesky waterline stains. 1) Avoid super-strength acids;  2) keep in mind that even mild cleaners like lemon juice will remove hull wax;  and 3) try to stay ahead of stains by more regular sponging of the boat-top and waterline.

Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Arkup, the “avant-garde life on water” company, has designed a new luxury home that integrates solar on the roof and a newly approved lithium ion marine battery system. The main selling features are that it can rise with sea levels via jacks, withstand extreme weather, move as a regular electric propelled boat, and provide it’s own water plus – of course – electricity.

There are no specifications on the solar panels used – merely multiple notations that 30kW of panels can fit on the roof in 2,300 sq feet.

The home’s default design is specified to the marine approved Orca Energy Storage System made by Corvus Energy. The systems are liquid or air cooled lithium ion battery kits. The individual battery packs are 5.7kW each and individual stacks go up to 137kWh. 

The Orca system was recently approved by DNV GL – global ocean classification body – as being safe for maritime usage.

The Arkup is powered by an electric propulsion system – adding to Electrek’s electric boat collection. The system can move at up to 7 knots per hour with a range of 300 nautical miles. With its solar propulsion system – it could probably run indefinitely.

Two points from Arkup’s promotional material gives a feel for the market, in addition to luxury, that they’re aiming for:

Sustainable: Environmentally friendly, powered by solar energy, no fuel, zero emission, equipped with waste management, rainwater harvesting and purification systems, our living yachts are totally off-the-grid.

Resilient:  Made for all environments and designed to withstand category 4 hurricane winds, our livable yachts are equipped with a hydraulic self-elevating system to prevent from sea sickness and flooding.

Digital drawings from the marketing material:

Electrek’s Take

Building homes like this is more a play on resilience with a whole lot of money than anything else. 30kW of solar and a lithium ion a marine battery system, plus onsite water purification means you can survive independent of any connection to the mainland.

As the group strongly pushes the customizability of the project, they’d be even more sustainable if there were indoor farming options. Maybe we ought suggest to them that they ought build a magenta colored greenhouse as a room?

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering has more information regarding boat toilets and all your other marine sanitation supply needs. 

via Conquering (or Coexisting with) Waterline Stains

via Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Your Marine Heads Specialists Talk About Some Great Ways to Get Your Fishing Fix During Winter

Raritan Engineering your marine heads suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to find some great winter fishing spots.

For hardcore anglers, myself among them, just about any fishing is better than none at all. It’s not even necessarily a matter of traveling to a warmer climate. It’s the fishing, which is why I sometimes toss piles of fleece and Gore-Tex into the truck and head for a winter steelhead river, where I can wade happily for hours and cast along the edges of icy slush. 

Winter is also an opportune time to fish those places you’ve always wanted to try or for those species that have always fascinated you. Some years back, I fished with a longtime Florida bass guide who confessed in a quiet moment that his lifelong dream was to go tarpon fishing. 

Here are 15 top winter fishing destinations in the Lower 48. They aren’t the only ones. But I was trying for geographic variety so that most readers could reach one or more without having to spring for an airline ticket. So, check the list, check your gear, and scratch the itch.

1. OCEAN RUNNERS [WASHINGTON]

Steelhead in the Pacific Northwest are perhaps the most intensely politicized fish on earth. They are big, beautiful, and hard to catch. Their runs have been decimated by decades of habitat loss and overfishing. Freshwater trout are a sport, but oceangoing steelhead are a passion. 

Steelheading on the peninsula revolves around the little town of Forks, Washington, in the northwestern corner. It’s near the Sol Duc, Calawah, and Bogachiel Rivers, which together form the Quillayute system. Other well-known steelhead rivers, such as the Hoh, Queets, and Quinalt, are a short distance south, along the western side of the peninsula.

2. SKI-SLOPE TROUT [COLORADO]

There are some truly crazy trout fishermen in Colorado, where tire chains and four-wheel-drive vehicles are basic equipment for winter fishing. If those can’t get you to your favorite December water—and yes, that happens—you may need a snowmobile, too.

We Continue Discussing Awesome Places to Go for Your Next Winter Fishing Trip

Please browse our selection of marine heads at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Aspen, Vail, Breckenridge, Steamboat—scratch deeply enough around any major Colorado ski resort and you’ll find at least a few winter flyfishers. They’ve figured out that as long as there’s some open, flowing water nearby, the trout will eat something no matter how cold it is outside. 

A little more civilized (insert snooty sniff here) option is on the fabled Fryingpan tailwater near Aspen. It’s a 14-mile stretch, which stays open all winter, where big rainbows and browns feast on Mysis shrimp flushed out of Ruedi Reservoir upstream. 

3. FRESH STRIPES [GEORGIA]

It’s a little hard for many out-of-staters to think of Georgia as a striped-bass power-house, but consider these notes: The state-record striper is a mammoth 63-pounder taken from the Oconee River in 1967. Ancient history, you say? Nope. In 2002, another giant a few ounces shy of 60 pounds came from Lake Hartwell along the Georgia–South Carolina border.

A striper is a striper, and the same fundamental rule applies here as everywhere else they’re found: Find the baitfish, and you’ll find the bass. In winter, shad and herring schools tend to congregate in the lower reaches of major reservoirs or the lower ends of creek-mouth tributaries. 

So don’t forget these great tips for your next winter fishing expedition. 1) Fishing at any time of year is better than no fishing at all;  2) keep yourself warm while fishing from your boat;  and 3) winter is also an opportune time to fish those places you’ve always wanted to try or for those species that have always fascinated you.

This fish species can actually repair brain damage from freezing in the winter

Every winter, the northern European crucian carp gets frozen into the ice, and receives no oxygen. Every spring, when the ice melts, a seeming miracle occurs: the fish emerges from the ice and resumes normal life.

Or, not quite. When they thaw from their winter freeze, the crucian carp’s brain is not quite the same, according to new research. But the same researchers also found that the fish can recover from its months of anoxia.

What happens to their brains has been a little more elusive.

First, the fish were deprived of oxygen – a condition normally experienced in winter when the fish are frozen. After a week, they were resupplied with oxygen for an artificial spring.

Stains were used to detect cell death and growth.

Interestingly, a lack of oxygen showed no change in the normal rate of cell death in the brain. It wasn’t until the fish was reoxygenated that cell death was observed – the rate more than doubling.  

“When the anoxic fish were given 1 day of reoxygenation at normal oxygen levels, a 170 percent increase in the number of apoptotic cells was detected,” wrote researcher Lisa Yuen in her 2010 Master thesis.

For the next part of the research, the fish were trained how to navigate a maze to find food. Then, they were subjected to another artificial winter, revived again, brain cell death and all, and put back in the maze.

The fish navigated the maze and reached the food at the end just as quickly as they had before being deprived of oxygen – but their memories had suffered and they took more wrong turns while doing so, the researchers found.

For the final stage of the experiment, fish that hadn’t been trained to use the maze were subjected to an artificial winter, revived, then trained to use the maze.

According to the team, the remarkable recovery happened despite suffering damage to the telencephalon – the part of the fish brain thought to be a homologue to our own hippocampus, a key brain area involved in learning and memory.

“This makes the crucian carp an interesting model from a biomedical perspective – while it is unlikely that we will find ways to allow human tissues to survive severe anoxic insults without damage, it is feasible that studies on animals like the crucian carp can provide knowledge for how we can limit and repair the damage.”

Buy a marine head here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via 15 Best Winter Fishing Destinations

via Photo

via This Fish Species Can Actually Repair Brain Damage From Freezing in The Winter