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Keep Your Boat in Great Condition Longer

Raritan Engineering Company your TruDesign specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding future alternative boat fuels powering your success.

Your TruDesign professionals talk about how many boats use small lashing to tighten and finish off their lifelines. Don’t depend on the small 1/8” stainless loop welded on the pulpit. Instead, run the small lashing through the small stainless loop and then around the entire leg of the pulpit. 

For example, a broken outhaul can ruin a race. But you can be prepared for this with a few simple ideas. On small boat such as the Melges 24, I install a small ‘V’ cleat at the back of the boom on one side and drill a small hole on the other side. 

If you have a loose-footed main, you attach the mainsheet blocks using lashing or loops that go completely around the boom rather than just through an eye on the underside of the boom. Like the lifelines, this is much stronger and safer.

10 Simple Solutions for the Most Common Boating Breakdowns

You've seen the bumper sticker: A bad day of boating is better than a good day at work. Cute, but would you really feel that way if you were adrift 10 miles from the ramp, with a boatload of tired, cranky passengers and an engine that won't start? At that point, you don't need a slogan, you need a plan.

Sometimes, your only option might be to ask for help - either from a professional towing company or a fellow boater. But in most instances a well-prepared skipper can make the necessary repairs to get the boat back to port without assistance. 

#1: It's Sputtering and Losing Power
Your boat feels like it's running out of strength (and you've ruled out the No. 1 breakdown reason - running out of fuel). You most likely have a filter problem or fouled plugs.

Solution: Replace the in-line fuel filter - you did bring a spare, didn't you? If not, you can at least remove and clear the filter element of any debris, and drain any accumulated water. 

Prevention: It's possible to buy a bad load of fuel, but it's more likely that the fuel went bad while in your boat. Leaving a tank near empty for long periods of time can cause condensation and water in the gas. 

Older tanks might have debris at the bottom, which can get stirred up as the fuel level drops. The best solution might be increased filtration. Consider adding a larger aftermarket fuel filter. And don't forget the spare elements.

Carry Onboard: Spare filter or filter element and a filter wrench.

Good Boat Maintenance Means Less Spending Later On

#2: The Belt Broke
You probably won't hear the sound of a drive belt breaking over the general engine noise, but you will know something's wrong when your overheat warning light comes on, or your voltage meter shows that the alternator isn't charging. Having a broken belt is a scenario unique to inboards and I/Os, and one that can shut you down in hurry. Without a belt intact, you'll have no alternator or water pump.

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Solution: There's a lot of info out there on jury-rigging a temporary belt by using fishing line or pantyhose or some such. This might work, but wouldn't it be easier to just carry a spare, along with the wrenches needed to change it?

Prevention: Inspect, tighten and dress the belt. You also might want to check the condition of the pulleys' contact surfaces. Sometimes, corrosion can cause rough spots on the pulleys that will eat a brand-new belt in short order.

Carry Onboard: Marine tool kit, which includes everything needed for this and other basic repairs.

#3: The Engine Is Overheating
The needle on the temperature gauge is rising. This almost always means you have a lack of water flow in the cooling loop. Outboards, most small inboards and I/Os don't have radiators like your car, and instead use the water they are floating on to cool the engine. 

Solution: Trace the source. In a vast majority of cases, the problem is an obstruction in the raw water intake - like weeds, mud or a plastic bag. Locate the intake and clean it out.

A loose hose clamp or a split or burst hose can also slow water flow, and it can spray damaging moisture around the engine.

Prevention: Regularly service and replace the impeller. Also look at the condition of its housing. Scarring or pitting of the metal housing can cause even a good impeller to lose pumping power.

Make sure you or your mechanic checks for corrosion or blockage in the exhaust system. Every so often, have the exhaust risers and associated components opened up for inspection. 

Carry Onboard: Soft wire or rod to snake intake clogs.

So don't forget these great reminders on how to keep your boat in great condition. 1) If your engine is sputtering or losing power.....Replace the in-line fuel filter;  2) if the belt brakes.....There's a lot of info out there on jury-rigging a temporary belt by using fishing line or pantyhose or some such, or bring a spare;  and 3) the engine is overheating.....Trace the source. In a vast majority of cases, the problem is an obstruction in the raw water intake - like weeds, mud or a plastic bag. Locate the intake and clean it out.

New Zealand fisherman reels in 321-pound marlin too big for his boat

 
Josh Roberts spent an hour reeling in the massive marlin. "It was an epic day," he said.

Josh Roberts spent an hour reeling in the massive marlin. "It was an epic day," he said.

A 25-year-old angler in New Zealand caught himself a monster marlin during a fishing trip late last week — but the fish was so large he couldn't even haul it into his boat.

“It was an epic day,” recalled Josh Roberts, a Whangarei resident, of his 321-pound catch.

"It had a lot of fight in it, so I got the fish to the boat in about half an hour, then tried to pull it in but failed because it still had plenty of energy left in it," said Roberts, according to the New Zealand Herald.

"I basically tied it up alongside the boat so it would drag through the water,” said Roberts, adding that he raced back to shore to avoid having his catch stolen by sharks.  

Roberts hauled his catch home and used a relative’s smoker to cook the fish. He said he plans to give much of it away to co-workers and family, and then it’s right back out to the water.

"The forecast looks pretty good again for Friday, so I think I'll be out there again,” Roberts told the Herald. “I just love being out there on the water.”

Order your TruDesign parts here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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Installing Your New Boat Sound System Doesn't Have to Be Difficult

Suggestion: You can network the Clarion CMS4 along with an MFD using the optional MW6 NMEA 2000 interface adapter. It ties the sound system right into an onboard NMEA 2000 backbone to manage the audio on compatible MFDs from Garmin, Lowrance, Simrad and other popular brand names.

A marine stereo can be as easy or sophisticated as you like. Systems such as those from Clarion, Fusion, JL, Polk, Prospec and Rockford Fosgate provide lots of room for expansion. Beyond a head unit and speakers, you can add functions like amplifiers, subwoofers, tower speakers, remote controls, SiriusXM and speakers with LEDs to produce a rockin' audio/visual experience.

However a lot of today's aftermarket setups prove less ambitious, including a source unit, control/display and four marine speakers. A few include an amp and NMEA 2000 networking to control the sound through a multifunction display screen.

Here we outline DIY steps when it comes to a basic yet cutting edge Clarion Marine Bluetooth- and SiriusXM-enabled stereo that provides the versatility to add components later.

Ability Level: 4 of 5
Finish Time: Approx. 12 hours

Tools and Supplies

Clarion CMS4 digital marine source unit and display/controller
Clarion XC2410 marine amplifier
Clarion CM1623RL 6.5-inch marine coaxial speakers
16-gauge marine duplex speaker wire
Marine-grade cable for powering amplifier
Various butt and terminal connectors along with heat-shrink collars
Diagonal cutters, wire stripper and crimping tool
Heat gun
Drill motor and drill bits
Jigsaw
Phillips screwdriver

Install Source Unit

Clarion's CMS4 black-box source unit has a footprint of 7.5 by 9.75 inches. We used the four supplied self-tapping screws and washers to secure the module to a bulkhead on the inside of the helm console to keep it completely dry. Check behind the mounting surface area prior to drilling. Using the pigtail wires on the female portion of the Molex-style plug, attach the fused yellow wire to a 12-volt DC positive source of power. Link the black wire to ground.

Install Amplifier

We added the compact (3.23-by-7.17- inch) four-channel, 400-watt Clarion XC2410 marine Class D amp in order to enhance audio, installing it inside the helm console. Connect the red fused 12-volt DC positive power line directly to the output terminal on the battery selector switch, and connect the black wire to ground, making use of the properly sized cable for the length of both of these runs.

Set up Display/Controller

The water resistant 4-by-6-inch CMS4 display/controller flush-mounts. Use the provided template and jigsaw to make a cutout at the helm in order to drop in the display screen, after that use the supplied bracket to secure the system from the backside. Direct the control cable from the back of the display screen (together with the display controller USB cable and video cable) through the cutout and tighten the two provided nuts over mounting studs so as to secure the brace.

Install and Connect Audio Speakers

We set up two sets of Clarion's new CM1623RL high-performance marine coaxial 6.5-inch-diameter audio speakers-- one pair in the inwales of the bowrider area and one more in the inwales of the aft cockpit-- marking holes and after that cutting all of them using a jigsaw. Once the speaker holes are definitely cut, run aquatic duplex speaker wire from the source unit to every location, connecting the speakers making use of the supplied water resistant Deutsch connector plugs.

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Dan Dickison

Cruising sailors rely on their motors a great deal more than they want to confess. Even though the internet has indeed helped close the gap in between parts providers and cruising sailors in far corners of the planet, the long-term cruiser however has to carefully consider which spare components as well as supplies he needs to carry with him.

A list of suggested spare parts will differ somewhat by what brand name you engine you have and where you are travelling. Components for our old Volvo MD2B were really expensive and difficult to find anywhere, so my wife Theresa and I had to balance our desire to be self-sufficient along with our skimpy budget.

Fuel Filters

We had a Dahl fuel filter, most other boats had Racor. We located fuel filter components all over the world, however obtaining the amount and micron rating we needed to have was no guarantee. Keep in mind you have at the very least two filters: a remote main filter between the tank and the engine, and a factory-installed auxiliary filter on the motor itself. The secondary filter is certainly generally more challenging to find.

Engine Oil

In case you're choosy about motor oil-- and you should be-- you might find your preferred oil in some countries. In some cases it is readily available under a different label, and with a little research study you could sort this out. Generally speaking, you'll be able to locate diesel motor oil with the specified American Petroleum Institute (API) certification or its equivalent practically anywhere you can purchase fuel.

Belts

You'll need spare V-belts for you alternator, especially if it's the high-output type. It is almost impossible to judge the quality of a V-belt just by looking, and when you leave the US, it's harder to find the industrial-rated V-belts that you need to have for high-output alternators.

Alternators

Alternators have a fairly high rate of failing, but a repair is frequently as easy as changing the brushes. Many cruisers switch out factory-supplied alternators with high-output versions, conserving the original factory alternator as a spare. This might sound fine theoretically, but swapping between different types of alternator might require adjustments in alignment, belt length, or even voltage regulation systems.

Gearbox

Probably one of the most neglected part of the drive train is the gearbox. Gearbox fluid does not last forever, but exactly how often must you change it? A few engine owner's manuals do not even give replacement time periods. Mechanics Nick talked with said the oil in a typical two-shaft gearbox, like the Hurth, must be changed at least at every other engine oil change, or 200 hours of operation. Make sure you understand what type of fluid your gearbox uses-- it might be engine oil, automatic transmission fluid, or something else. Just like every other consumable, carry enough for at least a year of service.

This is just a preliminary list, but it covers the most common items. For a more detailed list of spares, check out Nigel Calder's excellent book dedicated particularly to marine diesels: "Marine Diesel Engines, Maintenance, Troubleshooting, and Repair." 

Visit us here at http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/sanitation-accessories/macerator-pump/ and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

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Are You Ready to Buy Your New Wakesurf Boat?

Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding future alternative boat fuels powering your success.

Your marine sanitation experts talk about how wakesurfing has all but taken over the watersports scene. Easier falls, a mellower learning curve and a laid-back lifestyle all contribute to the sport’s ever-increasing popularity and the reputation it enjoys as one of the fastest-growing watersports on the planet. Whether you’re 15 or 50, you can wakesurf. 

As V-drive inboards have gotten bigger and more advanced, wakesurf waves have grown exponentially (while at the same time becoming easier to create). For years, inboards have naturally created ocean-like swells, and they could always be safely surfed due to their inboard-motor configuration that tucked the propeller safely under the boat. 

Hull design has also evolved to make deeper boats with a higher freeboard and gunwales that allow for more ballast to create bigger and bigger waves. Boats have intentionally gone from lighter to heavier in an effort to move more lake from underneath your boat to behind your boat in the form of a wall of water. A deeper boat means a heavier, bigger boat, and that means you can safely use more ballast. 

With all this wake-making potential, you need something to control the shape of the wave when it’s formed on the hull bottom.

Check Out All Your Options Before Buying

Because marine sanitation is critical on your vessel, be sure to only buy from the best. Visit us at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

The old way of creating a wave was by heaving all your ballast to one side of the boat and living your life on the water in this crazy tilted world that gave you a big chiropractor bill by the end of the day. Most high-end inboards now have systems with wakeshaping plates that swing out or slide down from either side of the boat’s transom to crab the boat’s running attitude slightly and generate a massive wave without having to stick all your weight on one side. 

Modern wakesurf boats will also have some sort of plate just behind the rudder that is actuated from the dash and changes the pitch of the boat while underway, typically dragging to make the stern dig in and the bow ride a little higher. 

Finally, a note about size. If you’ve never owned a boat before, you might not think there’s much difference between a 21-footer and a 25-footer, but we’re here to tell you there’s a world of difference in that four-foot span. You have a lot to consider when buying a wakesurf boat, and size just might be the most important point. The first thing you should look into is whether the waterway you plan to surf on has size restrictions for boats. If it does, you may be in a 21-foot boat no matter what. Your next consideration is storage. 

Don't forget these great tips when buying your next wakesurf boat. 1) Most finance companies will require a good credit score, a credit history of at least five years and a large previous purchase via credit of at least $25,000;  2) buy your boat during peak boat season;  and 3) know which type of boat you want and need.

An 8 And 5-YO Are Sailing A Toy Ship Around The Globe, Tracking Its Journey Online

Children usually stick to sailing paper boats in ponds or bathtubs but two Scottish brothers are sailing one around the world. Don't believe us? Read on.

Ollie Ferguson (8) and his brother Harry (5) set their Playmobil pirate ship sailing last year into the North Sea as part of a bucket list of adventures that they want to enjoy. 

The boys added a counterweight to the ship to help it stay afloat. Its hull was filled with polystyrene to improve its buoyancy. Despite all these additions and modifications, no one expected the boat to survive this long.

The boys call their boat "Adventure" (of course) and the pirate ship has sailed hundreds of kilometres all the way from Scotland to Denmark.

Late last year, the Playmobil was launched off the coast of Mauritania, in the Atlantic Ocean, and it has been sailing ever since. It was also taken aboard the Christian Radich, a Norwegian full-rigged ship, and was then launched into a larger body of water to ensure it kept sailing. 

toy boat

The brothers' parents partnered with a leading GPS tracking company after the boys wished to track the ship's journey online. The Playmobil was then fitted with a state-of-the-art transmitter. 

Last week, however, the family announced that the toy ship's journey may have ended since it had not transmitted its location as it did twice a day. It had also missed several pings. 

Buy sanitation equipment here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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recycling sails

Don't Be So Quick To Trash Your Old Sails

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding finding new uses for old sails.

Your marine hot water heaters experts talk about how upcycling is a bit of a buzzword these days, but the concept is nothing new to the cruising sailor. While ­traditional recycling involves breaking down used ­products to create new raw materials (think old water bottles made into a new fleece vest), upcycling refers to the creative reuse of an item without so much processing (more along the lines of a table made from an old door). 

After we trialed our new main to make sure it fit properly, I looked for a spot to store the old one, planning to keep the damaged sail as an emergency backup. All I found was the settee in the main saloon. Keeping it as a spare was not an option. 

Sails, like all equipment, eventually need to be replaced, but major damage doesn’t have to take the wind out of your sails forever. With a little imagination, not only can you get a return on your investment, but, more important, you can save most of the material from ending up in the landfill. 

Made for the Shade

A boom tent is a basic ­rectangle, an easy project to start with. Here’s how I went about it:

  1. To determine the width of the boom tent, I measured the distance between the center of the boom and the bottom wire on the lifelines and multiplied by two. 
  2. Starting from the tack, I measured the needed length along the luff of the sail. By incorporating the grommets that were at regular intervals along the luff (and removing the slugs), I already had strong points on one side of the boom tent to use for tie-downs.
  3. I measured the width of the tent out from the luff and marked a dot every foot or so. By connecting the dots with a straight edge, I had a cut mark for the other side of the tent.
  4. After double-­checking my measurements, I made the cut and hemmed the raw edge. This particular sail had a fairly flat cut, so I simply used the foot of the sail as the other short end, with the added bonus that the large grommet at the tack worked as a strong tie-down point.
  5. I now had three edges of my big rectangle complete. The clew had too much reinforcement to do much with (quite heavy and near impossible to sew), so I cut it off, effectively squaring off the fourth side.

Playing the Angles

Breathe New Life Into Your Sails

The awning for the foredeck was more of a triangle than a rectangle, but the theory was all the same. I planned to use the spinnaker pole as the support, and I needed tie-downs at the two outboard edges, as well as one fore and one aft on the centerline.

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  1. Instead of working from a straight edge, this time I measured out from the center, drawing a capital I that was as tall as I wanted my awning long. 
  2. I measured and drew the top and bottom lines to the correct lengths, and then connected the four corners to create the outline of the awning.
  3. Since this was a much smaller piece of material, the tie-down attachments didn’t need to be quite as robust; a loop of strong webbing, well sewn at the corners, would be good enough.

Bug Off

We had been sleeping with a standard off-the-shelf mosquito net draped over the V-berth, but it wasn’t quite the right size. No matter how much tape I used to stick it up, the net came falling down after a few nights of tossing and turning. Instead of surrounding us with netting, I wanted to build a wall that enclosed the whole V-berth.

While the sewing machine was hot, I whipped up a storage bag for the dinghy, both for the offseason and to protect it when we store it on passage, rolled up and strapped down with ratchet straps.

Tools For the Job

  • Most industrial-strength sewing machines with a walking foot can handle sailcloth and other heavy fabrics. Sailrite, Juki and Adler machines are popular options, as are older Pfaff and Singer models. 

  • Sun exposure for a given project will inform your choice of thread. “We use a 200-denier PTFE or Teflon thread because it’s impervious to UV or any chemicals, and lasts the life of the fabric or even longer,” says Mark Hood.

  • You’ll need a sharp-point needle in the 20- to 23-gauge range to punch through sailcloth. Increase the gauge if you’re planning to sew through more than a few layers. 

  • Sailcloth is tough stuff, so you’ll need a large, sharp pair of scissors to cut patterns. To get through multiple layers and reinforced panels, try a razor blade.

So don't forget these great reminders on which tools you will need so that you can find new life for your old sails. You will need an industrial-strength sewing machine, thread, sharp-point needle in the 20 to 23 guage range, and a sailcloth.

California Police Officer Saves Dog From Burning Sailboat

Upon reaching the burning boat, he realized that in order to save the dog he would have to earn the scared animal’s trust first. As a horse trainer and all-around animal lover, Ruggles knew he was the right man for the job, and did what he could to calm the dog as the crowd watched tensely from the harbor.

“When I first got there, I reached out for the dog and he started barking and growling. So I tried to talk to him in a soft voice, and see if that would help,” Ruggles said. “He was very wide-eyed and his ears were up, so you could see how scared he was.”

Order your marine water here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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You Really Can Get Your Boat to Smell Great Again

As our long-term examination regarding sanitation hose makes its way through another long, scorching-- and progressively smellier-- summer season, it is actually a good time to consider methods to keep your plumbing system from turning into an olfactory horror. Listed here are simply a few of the suggestions that hose producers discussed with us when we launched our test of sanitation hose. Hose routing: Constantly slope pipes and hoses toward the holding tank after the preliminary rise. Any type of hose is going to eventually permeate if sewage is left standing in it. If long runs are simply inevitable, think about using well-secured Schedule 40 PVC pipe-- not DWV (drain-waste-vent) PVC, which has thinner walls. Antifreeze: PVC hoses are not compatible with glycol- or alcohol-based winterizing products. The glycol or alcohol can draw out some of the PVC plasticizers, resulting in enhanced permeability and tightness. Even though the hose will certainly not fail, it may permeate. Oil: Synthetic rubber hoses made of EPDM or butyl rubber might not endure large quantities of mineral or vegetable oil. Having said that, little amounts of oil which might find their way into a head due to owner maintenance practices must not be hazardous-- but this is certainly another reason why greasing head pumps with heavy silicone grease at the beginning of every season is a much better technique than the often-suggested practice of flushing a tablespoon of vegetable oil in the head. In fact, the vegetable oil will merely quicken the grease's washout. Wipe test: In the event that you think a permeated hose, scrub the hose area clean, wait for several days and after that wipe the suspect hose with a moist towel and sniff the cloth. In the event that it is permeation, the odor will certainly come back soon enough. Leaks: Even though permeation is certainly a typical cause of hose stench, it is by no means the sole cause. Slow leaks around fittings and hose clamps, and sewage that was inadequately cleaned up are likewise regular reasons; examine the ends before presuming you have a failed hose. Hose connections: Barbs vs. smooth adapters. SeaLand, maker of the SeaLand hose brand name, is definitely a believer in smooth connections. Properly sized, the company claims, they are easier to make use of, seal better, and do much less damage to the hose. ounded profiles. Not all fittings are a good match; if fit appears too loose, consult the hose maker. Hose lubrication for installment: A suitable lubricant could be a huge help in getting a hose installed properly. Read the hose specifications to be certain the lube is appropriate. EPDM, for example, is not suitable with petroleum, so K-Y, glycol, or glycerine are actually much better choices. Soap will work but can leave a non-drying residue that can interfere with a secure fit, particularly when utilizing non-barbed fittings. Fit the hoses a few inches long: Hose removal often includes destruction of the hose. Providing a few extra inches to play with will streamline future repairs, rather like leaving halyards a few feet too long to allow for wear and cutting off knots. Visit us here at http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/holding-tanks-accessories/ and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs. via Photo

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Your Boat Cleaning Products Experts Promote Safety In All Boating Situations 

Raritan Engineering your boat cleaning products professionals would love to share with you this week these helpful tips for surviving areas with high tsunami potential.

The first step to survival is preparation, and we hope sharing the Neal’s insights and firsthand experience will help others cruising tsunami-prone waters to be better prepared in the event of an earthquake.

From Mahina Expeditions:

As sailors, we need to be aware of the ever present threat of a tsunami. By establishing emergency procedures for your crew and vessel along with knowing what to expect and what to do in the event of a tsunami, it will be far less likely that you or your crew will become casualties or that your vessel will sustain damage.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Tsunami Warning Center is located at Ewa Beach, Hawaii. They have seafloor and coastal sensors located around the Pacific, but after an earthquake, it takes them at least 12-15 minutes to analyze data to determine whether there is the potential for a tsunami.

When Ashore in a Coastal Location

In any coastal location, always note the tidal range and times. If you ever see the sea level receding lower than normal, realize that this is the natural warning sign of an approaching tsunami. 

A tsunami can strike anywhere along most of the U.S. coastline. The most destructive tsunamis have occurred along the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Hawaii.

Earthquake-induced movement of the ocean floor most often generates tsunamis. If a major earthquake or landslide occurs close to shore, the first wave in a series could reach the beach in a few minutes, even before a warning is issued. 

Your Boat Cleaning Products Specialists Know That Having an Emergency Kit For Your Family s Crucial

Tsunami Preparedness Checklist

During a Tsunami

When Aboard

If you are docked and experience an earthquake or rapidly receding water, immediately start your engine, cut your docklines and motor at full speed to water deeper than 150 feet. 

At Anchor

If you are at anchor and experience an earthquake or rapidly receding water, immediately start your engine, raise your anchor and get to deeper water. In the 2009 tsunami that hit Niuatoputapu, friends aboard a 39-foot sloop tried to raise anchor immediately after the earthquake but found their chain wrapped around a coral head, so they let out all of their chain. 

When leaving the boat

Here are some priorities to quickly grab:

1. Passports, cash and credit cards

2. Iridium satellite phone

3. Cell phone

4. VHF hand held radio (this proved very helpful in Samoa)

5. Flashlights

6. Knapsack

7. Water bottle

8. Granola bars or similar foods

9. Necessary prescription medicines

10. Running shoes

11. Jacket

Visit us here http://www.raritaneng.com/category-pages/cleaners/ at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have everything to take care of your marine supply needs.

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Your Seacock Specialists Caution That Boats Can Sink Even If Something Bad Doesn't Happen 

Raritan Engineering your seacocks professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to keep your boat from sinking while its docked.

A boat shouldn’t sink ­unless something ­really bad happens, right? Your seacock analysts know that a high-speed collision, a fiery fuel explosion, a ­direct strike by lightning — these events ­certainly can sink a boat. 

Studies of insurance claims by BoatU.S. back this up, showing that more than two-thirds of recreational-boat sinkings happen at the dock or on a mooring. BoatU.S. further ­estimates that only 35 percent of such sinkings are out of an owner’s hands.

The (Not Always) Mighty Bilge Pump

A bilge pump can really save the day in the event of an unexpected gusher, and it’s great for cleaning up the condensation and other unavoidable drips and drops that collect in the bilge. 

Do Winter Right

When it comes to winterizing, an ounce of prevention can be worth gallons and gallons of cure. Ice can damage hoses below the waterline, strainer baskets and through-hull valves. Water can contaminate the gear lube during the boating season — if it freezes, it can crack metal and blow seals. 

Your Boat is Full of Holes

Not to be an alarmist, but your boat is likely already full of holes below the waterline. These can include holes for a drain plug, mounting bolts, transducers, sensors, through-hull valves and other items. In a perfect world, these — and any downstream hose clamps, fittings and strainers — would all be properly fastened, sealed and/or clamped to keep water out. And they likely were when the boat was brand-new. 

Come visit us at Raritan Engineering because we have all the seacocks for all your sanitation needs.

Be Good to Your Bellows

Your seacock experts feel that the bellows maintain their watertight seal while allowing the drive to turn side to side and trim up and down, but these repeated movements can eventually result in tearing from fatigue. Age and deterioration can cause the rubber to break down over time, especially if exposed to heat or other harsh conditions. 

One Drop at a Time

One below-the-waterline hole that deserves special attention is the opening where the propeller shaft passes through on an inboard boat. This will often be sealed with a few rings of packing material and a tightening gland all nicely referred to as the “stuffing box.” 

Batten Down the Hatches

This simple step would prevent countless sinkings. At some point, it is going to rain. If the hatches leak — ­especially cockpit hatches where rainwater can accumulate — then we can end up with water in the bilge, an overwhelmed bilge pump, and a progressive sinking situation. 

Good Lines

A falling tide can easily trap a boat beneath a dock, where it will fill up with water as the tide rises — often leaving it hanging on its side by its lines. Good dock-line ­technique can save the day. 

Weighty Issues

It’s not uncommon to see a boat with cockpit scuppers or freeing ports designed to sit barely above the waterline once people, gear and fuel are aboard. Now replace that two-stroke outboard with a heavier-by-200-pounds four-stroke and watch the scuppers sink down to the ­waterline before people and gear are aboard. 

Cockpit Crisis

There have also been a surprising number of sinkings due to cockpit drain fittings and hose fittings leaking into the bilge. Sometimes these are routed through the bilge area with little to no access, making it difficult to ensure hose clamps are tight and the hose is in good condition. 

Doh!

Of course, there are always a few bonehead mistakes that send boats to the bottom every year. Forgetting the drain plug when launching, forgetting to tighten the lid after cleaning a strainer, and leaving a shore hose running on deck after cleaning have all resulted in multiple dockside sinkers. 

Choose your marine supplies here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine supply needs.

via 10 Ways to Prevent Your Boat From Sinking Dockside

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Key West, Florida

Summer Boating Can Help You Say Goodbye to Summer Stress

Raritan Engineering Company your electric toilets specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding awesome summer boating destinations you need to know about.

Your electric toilets experts talk about how boating is known to reduce stress and improve quality of life. Luckily, you don’t have to sail the deep blue sea for some great voyages. Ninety percent of Americans live less than an hour from a navigable body of water, whether a sprawling lake or the beautiful ocean.

1. Marina del Rey, California

Just a 45-minute drive from downtown Los Angeles and a stone’s throw from Santa Monica, Marina del Rey is the largest manmade small-craft harbor in the United States. Experiencing a major renaissance, the area is known to woo the rich and famous with its highbrow amenities, including the luxurious Ritz Carlton Marina del Rey, which is situated on the marina itself.

2. Newport, Rhode Island

Newport Harbor served as the port of call for the famed America’s Cup — an international yachting race — for years. Boaters still come from around the world to check out the yachting facilities and to experience the quaint New England charm at sea. 
3. Key West, Florida

The southernmost island is renowned for having the best sunset on the continent, so sunset cruising is a popular activity. Thanks to the laidback lifestyle, boaters here are casual with a “don’t worry, be happy” attitude. 
4. Lake Havasu, Arizona

Quickly emerging as a hot spot for boaters, Lake Havasu is a large reservoir in the middle of the Arizona desert in Mojave County with 60 miles of waterways to explore. 

See your choice of electric toilets here at Raritan Engineering, and see how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Boaters can find hidden coves, sandbars, beaches and the iconic London Bridge. In the past decade, Lake Havasu has cultivated a religious following among spring breakers — 24-hour partying is not unusual — but the college-aged crowd can be found here throughout the year, thanks to the lake’s warm temperature, 16 boat launches and plenty of party-boat rentals.

5. Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Life seems to revolve around the water in this city known for its 23 miles of beaches. Thanks to more than 300 miles of inland waterways, Fort Lauderdale is referred to as the “Venice of America.” More than 40,000 yachts are based in the sunny city, giving Fort Lauderdale bragging rights as the yachting capital of the world, and not surprisingly, the annual Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show is one of the largest in the world.

You’ve already had a big hit by buying the yacht and making yourself happy but now the real long term benefit switches in. The number one key to making your own seratonin is to be outside. Most people spend less than twenty minutes a day in the sun. It’s pretty hard to avoid the outdoors when on a yacht.

• take your sunglasses off early morning… the dawn light will get the seratonin going early and glass will block your receptors in the eyes
• have breakfast on deck
• swim to a beach and do some yoga or just go for a walk (exercise will get seratonin going too)
• remove sunglasses again around midday for twenty minutes
• avoid sunburn during hottest parts of day
• Cocktails or drinks on sunset on deck… compulsory (signals body to switch to melatonin production as sun goes down)

Linked to Seratonin production is Vitamin D. Believe it or not three quarters of Australians are now considered deficient in this essential vitamin. Darker skinned people may need six times as much as lighter skinned people. A blood test is the only way to know if you are deficient but if you are it’s not just ricketts that you should worry about. .

• expose arms to sun mid morning for twenty minutes
• do not use sunscreen in winter and only after 9 am in summer
• eat more fish (caught from the stern of course) or take fish oil tablets
• more nuts especially almonds at cocktail hour

By now you are determined to take a week off work just to make sure your seratonin and vitamin d levels are fine. Well it gets better. Insomnia is a huge problem with millions suffering from it leading to again a scary number of illnesses.

So to cure insomnia follow these rules

• take the yacht away for 5 days
• try not to use mobile phones or iPads at night
• sail till tired
• cook a healthy meal
• try to limit drinks to sunset cocktail hour
• go to bed early

So don’t forget these great locations for getting rid of that summer stress. 1) Marina del Rey, California;  2) Newport, Rhode Island;  3) Key West, Florida;  4) Lake Havasu, Arizona;  and 5) Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Couple on Sailboat Hears Dog Crying in Distance, Finds Puppy Alone on Deserted Island

Meet Captain Joel and Dr. Sheddy, a couple on a mission to help animals and communities worldwide. They sail around the world together in their sailboat, providing free veterinary care to vulnerable populations.

In 2006, Sheddy met her soulmate, Captain Joel, at school. Joel had a passion of his own, sailing, and had been saving for his own boat since he was 16 years old.

They decided to pursue their dreams together, combining three of their biggest passions: traveling, sailing, and animal care.

The couple documents their adventures and shares them online, giving people a window into their unique life.

One day, while relaxing in their boat, the couple heard the faint cries of what sounded like a puppy. They rowed to the nearby deserted island to investigate.

His paws were raw, she said, from running on the hot sand. Sheddy gave the pup a quick snack and a drink, while Joel rowed to the closest inhabited island.

Sheddy explained the likely circumstances surrounding the puppy’s predicament. During extremely low tide, the two islands are connected, and the puppy likely ran across and found himself unable to return as the tide began to rise.

They eventually did find them and learned the pup had been missing for four days.

Sheddy was thrilled to be able to reunite the puppy with his family. “You’re home!” she squealed, scratching his head with affection.

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via Best Boating Destinations for Summer

via Sailing Is Good For You

via Couple on Sailboat Hears Dog Crying in Distance, Finds Puppy Alone on Deserted Island

 

 

How to Pick Up a Downed Rider, Skier or Tuber

How To Pick Up Downed Riders While Minimizing Injuries 

Raritan Engineering Company your macerating pump specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding properly picking up your downed water skier.

Your macerating pump experts talk about water sports offer boaters a unique experience not available to non boaters. That privilege comes with the responsibility to ensure safety for your crew and to extend courtesy to fellow boaters.

In this month’s Seamanship, we examine how these principles apply to the task of retrieving a skier, tuber or rider who has fallen.

The first thing to do is to remind the spotter to keep their eyes fixed on the person in the water. Positive reinforcement goes a long way in helping people stay focused. The spotter’s job is important. It can seem nonessential — until that one time a downed rider is hurt and goes under for some reason. Make your approach from downwind; this will help you control the boat at the slow speed you should be moving at as you get close. 

Turn the engine off once you reach the person in the water. Shifting into neutral and leaving the engine running is not safe. Shut it down.

Finally, be aware of how your wake is affecting others. In addition to other boaters, docks and shoreside properties, this applies to other water sports enthusiasts too. 

Instead, come down to dead slow, turn the boat 180 degrees, and proceed back down the path of your wake. Once the rider is safely aboard, resume surfing in the established direction for the body of water you are on.

via How To Pick Up A Downed Waterskier, Wakesurfer, Wakeboard Rider or Tuber

Image result for boat maintenance

Keep Your Boat in Great Condition Longer

Raritan Engineering Company your TruDesign specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding future alternative boat fuels powering your success.

Your TruDesign professionals talk about how many boats use small lashing to tighten and finish off their lifelines. Don’t depend on the small 1/8” stainless loop welded on the pulpit. Instead, run the small lashing through the small stainless loop and then around the entire leg of the pulpit. 

For example, a broken outhaul can ruin a race. But you can be prepared for this with a few simple ideas. On small boat such as the Melges 24, I install a small ‘V’ cleat at the back of the boom on one side and drill a small hole on the other side. 

If you have a loose-footed main, you attach the mainsheet blocks using lashing or loops that go completely around the boom rather than just through an eye on the underside of the boom. Like the lifelines, this is much stronger and safer.

10 Simple Solutions for the Most Common Boating Breakdowns

You’ve seen the bumper sticker: A bad day of boating is better than a good day at work. Cute, but would you really feel that way if you were adrift 10 miles from the ramp, with a boatload of tired, cranky passengers and an engine that won’t start? At that point, you don’t need a slogan, you need a plan.

Sometimes, your only option might be to ask for help – either from a professional towing company or a fellow boater. But in most instances a well-prepared skipper can make the necessary repairs to get the boat back to port without assistance. 

#1: It’s Sputtering and Losing Power
Your boat feels like it’s running out of strength (and you’ve ruled out the No. 1 breakdown reason – running out of fuel). You most likely have a filter problem or fouled plugs.

Solution: Replace the in-line fuel filter – you did bring a spare, didn’t you? If not, you can at least remove and clear the filter element of any debris, and drain any accumulated water. 

Prevention: It’s possible to buy a bad load of fuel, but it’s more likely that the fuel went bad while in your boat. Leaving a tank near empty for long periods of time can cause condensation and water in the gas. 

Older tanks might have debris at the bottom, which can get stirred up as the fuel level drops. The best solution might be increased filtration. Consider adding a larger aftermarket fuel filter. And don’t forget the spare elements.

Carry Onboard: Spare filter or filter element and a filter wrench.

Good Boat Maintenance Means Less Spending Later On

#2: The Belt Broke
You probably won’t hear the sound of a drive belt breaking over the general engine noise, but you will know something’s wrong when your overheat warning light comes on, or your voltage meter shows that the alternator isn’t charging. Having a broken belt is a scenario unique to inboards and I/Os, and one that can shut you down in hurry. Without a belt intact, you’ll have no alternator or water pump.

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Solution: There’s a lot of info out there on jury-rigging a temporary belt by using fishing line or pantyhose or some such. This might work, but wouldn’t it be easier to just carry a spare, along with the wrenches needed to change it?

Prevention: Inspect, tighten and dress the belt. You also might want to check the condition of the pulleys’ contact surfaces. Sometimes, corrosion can cause rough spots on the pulleys that will eat a brand-new belt in short order.

Carry Onboard: Marine tool kit, which includes everything needed for this and other basic repairs.

#3: The Engine Is Overheating
The needle on the temperature gauge is rising. This almost always means you have a lack of water flow in the cooling loop. Outboards, most small inboards and I/Os don’t have radiators like your car, and instead use the water they are floating on to cool the engine. 

Solution: Trace the source. In a vast majority of cases, the problem is an obstruction in the raw water intake – like weeds, mud or a plastic bag. Locate the intake and clean it out.

A loose hose clamp or a split or burst hose can also slow water flow, and it can spray damaging moisture around the engine.

Prevention: Regularly service and replace the impeller. Also look at the condition of its housing. Scarring or pitting of the metal housing can cause even a good impeller to lose pumping power.

Make sure you or your mechanic checks for corrosion or blockage in the exhaust system. Every so often, have the exhaust risers and associated components opened up for inspection. 

Carry Onboard: Soft wire or rod to snake intake clogs.

So don’t forget these great reminders on how to keep your boat in great condition. 1) If your engine is sputtering or losing power…..Replace the in-line fuel filter;  2) if the belt brakes…..There’s a lot of info out there on jury-rigging a temporary belt by using fishing line or pantyhose or some such, or bring a spare;  and 3) the engine is overheating…..Trace the source. In a vast majority of cases, the problem is an obstruction in the raw water intake – like weeds, mud or a plastic bag. Locate the intake and clean it out.

New Zealand fisherman reels in 321-pound marlin too big for his boat

 
Josh Roberts spent an hour reeling in the massive marlin. "It was an epic day," he said.

Josh Roberts spent an hour reeling in the massive marlin. “It was an epic day,” he said.

A 25-year-old angler in New Zealand caught himself a monster marlin during a fishing trip late last week — but the fish was so large he couldn’t even haul it into his boat.

“It was an epic day,” recalled Josh Roberts, a Whangarei resident, of his 321-pound catch.

“It had a lot of fight in it, so I got the fish to the boat in about half an hour, then tried to pull it in but failed because it still had plenty of energy left in it,” said Roberts, according to the New Zealand Herald.

“I basically tied it up alongside the boat so it would drag through the water,” said Roberts, adding that he raced back to shore to avoid having his catch stolen by sharks.  

Roberts hauled his catch home and used a relative’s smoker to cook the fish. He said he plans to give much of it away to co-workers and family, and then it’s right back out to the water.

“The forecast looks pretty good again for Friday, so I think I’ll be out there again,” Roberts told the Herald. “I just love being out there on the water.”

Order your TruDesign parts here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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Image result for installing a sound system on your boat

Installing Your New Boat Sound System Doesn’t Have to Be Difficult

Suggestion: You can network the Clarion CMS4 along with an MFD using the optional MW6 NMEA 2000 interface adapter. It ties the sound system right into an onboard NMEA 2000 backbone to manage the audio on compatible MFDs from Garmin, Lowrance, Simrad and other popular brand names.

A marine stereo can be as easy or sophisticated as you like. Systems such as those from Clarion, Fusion, JL, Polk, Prospec and Rockford Fosgate provide lots of room for expansion. Beyond a head unit and speakers, you can add functions like amplifiers, subwoofers, tower speakers, remote controls, SiriusXM and speakers with LEDs to produce a rockin’ audio/visual experience.

However a lot of today’s aftermarket setups prove less ambitious, including a source unit, control/display and four marine speakers. A few include an amp and NMEA 2000 networking to control the sound through a multifunction display screen.

Here we outline DIY steps when it comes to a basic yet cutting edge Clarion Marine Bluetooth- and SiriusXM-enabled stereo that provides the versatility to add components later.

Ability Level: 4 of 5
Finish Time: Approx. 12 hours

Tools and Supplies

Clarion CMS4 digital marine source unit and display/controller
Clarion XC2410 marine amplifier
Clarion CM1623RL 6.5-inch marine coaxial speakers
16-gauge marine duplex speaker wire
Marine-grade cable for powering amplifier
Various butt and terminal connectors along with heat-shrink collars
Diagonal cutters, wire stripper and crimping tool
Heat gun
Drill motor and drill bits
Jigsaw
Phillips screwdriver

Install Source Unit

Clarion’s CMS4 black-box source unit has a footprint of 7.5 by 9.75 inches. We used the four supplied self-tapping screws and washers to secure the module to a bulkhead on the inside of the helm console to keep it completely dry. Check behind the mounting surface area prior to drilling. Using the pigtail wires on the female portion of the Molex-style plug, attach the fused yellow wire to a 12-volt DC positive source of power. Link the black wire to ground.

Install Amplifier

We added the compact (3.23-by-7.17- inch) four-channel, 400-watt Clarion XC2410 marine Class D amp in order to enhance audio, installing it inside the helm console. Connect the red fused 12-volt DC positive power line directly to the output terminal on the battery selector switch, and connect the black wire to ground, making use of the properly sized cable for the length of both of these runs.

Set up Display/Controller

The water resistant 4-by-6-inch CMS4 display/controller flush-mounts. Use the provided template and jigsaw to make a cutout at the helm in order to drop in the display screen, after that use the supplied bracket to secure the system from the backside. Direct the control cable from the back of the display screen (together with the display controller USB cable and video cable) through the cutout and tighten the two provided nuts over mounting studs so as to secure the brace.

Install and Connect Audio Speakers

We set up two sets of Clarion’s new CM1623RL high-performance marine coaxial 6.5-inch-diameter audio speakers– one pair in the inwales of the bowrider area and one more in the inwales of the aft cockpit– marking holes and after that cutting all of them using a jigsaw. Once the speaker holes are definitely cut, run aquatic duplex speaker wire from the source unit to every location, connecting the speakers making use of the supplied water resistant Deutsch connector plugs.

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Dan Dickison

Cruising sailors rely on their motors a great deal more than they want to confess. Even though the internet has indeed helped close the gap in between parts providers and cruising sailors in far corners of the planet, the long-term cruiser however has to carefully consider which spare components as well as supplies he needs to carry with him.

A list of suggested spare parts will differ somewhat by what brand name you engine you have and where you are travelling. Components for our old Volvo MD2B were really expensive and difficult to find anywhere, so my wife Theresa and I had to balance our desire to be self-sufficient along with our skimpy budget.

Fuel Filters

We had a Dahl fuel filter, most other boats had Racor. We located fuel filter components all over the world, however obtaining the amount and micron rating we needed to have was no guarantee. Keep in mind you have at the very least two filters: a remote main filter between the tank and the engine, and a factory-installed auxiliary filter on the motor itself. The secondary filter is certainly generally more challenging to find.

Engine Oil

In case you’re choosy about motor oil– and you should be– you might find your preferred oil in some countries. In some cases it is readily available under a different label, and with a little research study you could sort this out. Generally speaking, you’ll be able to locate diesel motor oil with the specified American Petroleum Institute (API) certification or its equivalent practically anywhere you can purchase fuel.

Belts

You’ll need spare V-belts for you alternator, especially if it’s the high-output type. It is almost impossible to judge the quality of a V-belt just by looking, and when you leave the US, it’s harder to find the industrial-rated V-belts that you need to have for high-output alternators.

Alternators

Alternators have a fairly high rate of failing, but a repair is frequently as easy as changing the brushes. Many cruisers switch out factory-supplied alternators with high-output versions, conserving the original factory alternator as a spare. This might sound fine theoretically, but swapping between different types of alternator might require adjustments in alignment, belt length, or even voltage regulation systems.

Gearbox

Probably one of the most neglected part of the drive train is the gearbox. Gearbox fluid does not last forever, but exactly how often must you change it? A few engine owner’s manuals do not even give replacement time periods. Mechanics Nick talked with said the oil in a typical two-shaft gearbox, like the Hurth, must be changed at least at every other engine oil change, or 200 hours of operation. Make sure you understand what type of fluid your gearbox uses– it might be engine oil, automatic transmission fluid, or something else. Just like every other consumable, carry enough for at least a year of service.

This is just a preliminary list, but it covers the most common items. For a more detailed list of spares, check out Nigel Calder’s excellent book dedicated particularly to marine diesels: “Marine Diesel Engines, Maintenance, Troubleshooting, and Repair.” 

Visit us here at http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/sanitation-accessories/macerator-pump/ and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Image result for buying a new wakesurf boat
 

Are You Ready to Buy Your New Wakesurf Boat?

Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding future alternative boat fuels powering your success.

Your marine sanitation experts talk about how wakesurfing has all but taken over the watersports scene. Easier falls, a mellower learning curve and a laid-back lifestyle all contribute to the sport’s ever-increasing popularity and the reputation it enjoys as one of the fastest-growing watersports on the planet. Whether you’re 15 or 50, you can wakesurf. 

As V-drive inboards have gotten bigger and more advanced, wakesurf waves have grown exponentially (while at the same time becoming easier to create). For years, inboards have naturally created ocean-like swells, and they could always be safely surfed due to their inboard-motor configuration that tucked the propeller safely under the boat. 

Hull design has also evolved to make deeper boats with a higher freeboard and gunwales that allow for more ballast to create bigger and bigger waves. Boats have intentionally gone from lighter to heavier in an effort to move more lake from underneath your boat to behind your boat in the form of a wall of water. A deeper boat means a heavier, bigger boat, and that means you can safely use more ballast. 

With all this wake-making potential, you need something to control the shape of the wave when it’s formed on the hull bottom.

Check Out All Your Options Before Buying

Because marine sanitation is critical on your vessel, be sure to only buy from the best. Visit us at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

The old way of creating a wave was by heaving all your ballast to one side of the boat and living your life on the water in this crazy tilted world that gave you a big chiropractor bill by the end of the day. Most high-end inboards now have systems with wakeshaping plates that swing out or slide down from either side of the boat’s transom to crab the boat’s running attitude slightly and generate a massive wave without having to stick all your weight on one side. 

Modern wakesurf boats will also have some sort of plate just behind the rudder that is actuated from the dash and changes the pitch of the boat while underway, typically dragging to make the stern dig in and the bow ride a little higher. 

Finally, a note about size. If you’ve never owned a boat before, you might not think there’s much difference between a 21-footer and a 25-footer, but we’re here to tell you there’s a world of difference in that four-foot span. You have a lot to consider when buying a wakesurf boat, and size just might be the most important point. The first thing you should look into is whether the waterway you plan to surf on has size restrictions for boats. If it does, you may be in a 21-foot boat no matter what. Your next consideration is storage. 

Don’t forget these great tips when buying your next wakesurf boat. 1) Most finance companies will require a good credit score, a credit history of at least five years and a large previous purchase via credit of at least $25,000;  2) buy your boat during peak boat season;  and 3) know which type of boat you want and need.

An 8 And 5-YO Are Sailing A Toy Ship Around The Globe, Tracking Its Journey Online

Children usually stick to sailing paper boats in ponds or bathtubs but two Scottish brothers are sailing one around the world. Don’t believe us? Read on.

Ollie Ferguson (8) and his brother Harry (5) set their Playmobil pirate ship sailing last year into the North Sea as part of a bucket list of adventures that they want to enjoy. 

The boys added a counterweight to the ship to help it stay afloat. Its hull was filled with polystyrene to improve its buoyancy. Despite all these additions and modifications, no one expected the boat to survive this long.

The boys call their boat “Adventure” (of course) and the pirate ship has sailed hundreds of kilometres all the way from Scotland to Denmark.

Late last year, the Playmobil was launched off the coast of Mauritania, in the Atlantic Ocean, and it has been sailing ever since. It was also taken aboard the Christian Radich, a Norwegian full-rigged ship, and was then launched into a larger body of water to ensure it kept sailing. 

toy boat

The brothers’ parents partnered with a leading GPS tracking company after the boys wished to track the ship’s journey online. The Playmobil was then fitted with a state-of-the-art transmitter. 

Last week, however, the family announced that the toy ship’s journey may have ended since it had not transmitted its location as it did twice a day. It had also missed several pings. 

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via An 8 And 5-YO Are Sailing A Toy Ship Around The Globe, Tracking Its Journey Online

recycling sails

Don’t Be So Quick To Trash Your Old Sails

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding finding new uses for old sails.

Your marine hot water heaters experts talk about how upcycling is a bit of a buzzword these days, but the concept is nothing new to the cruising sailor. While ­traditional recycling involves breaking down used ­products to create new raw materials (think old water bottles made into a new fleece vest), upcycling refers to the creative reuse of an item without so much processing (more along the lines of a table made from an old door). 

After we trialed our new main to make sure it fit properly, I looked for a spot to store the old one, planning to keep the damaged sail as an emergency backup. All I found was the settee in the main saloon. Keeping it as a spare was not an option. 

Sails, like all equipment, eventually need to be replaced, but major damage doesn’t have to take the wind out of your sails forever. With a little imagination, not only can you get a return on your investment, but, more important, you can save most of the material from ending up in the landfill. 

Made for the Shade

A boom tent is a basic ­rectangle, an easy project to start with. Here’s how I went about it:

  1. To determine the width of the boom tent, I measured the distance between the center of the boom and the bottom wire on the lifelines and multiplied by two. 
  2. Starting from the tack, I measured the needed length along the luff of the sail. By incorporating the grommets that were at regular intervals along the luff (and removing the slugs), I already had strong points on one side of the boom tent to use for tie-downs.
  3. I measured the width of the tent out from the luff and marked a dot every foot or so. By connecting the dots with a straight edge, I had a cut mark for the other side of the tent.
  4. After double-­checking my measurements, I made the cut and hemmed the raw edge. This particular sail had a fairly flat cut, so I simply used the foot of the sail as the other short end, with the added bonus that the large grommet at the tack worked as a strong tie-down point.
  5. I now had three edges of my big rectangle complete. The clew had too much reinforcement to do much with (quite heavy and near impossible to sew), so I cut it off, effectively squaring off the fourth side.

Playing the Angles

Breathe New Life Into Your Sails

The awning for the foredeck was more of a triangle than a rectangle, but the theory was all the same. I planned to use the spinnaker pole as the support, and I needed tie-downs at the two outboard edges, as well as one fore and one aft on the centerline.

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  1. Instead of working from a straight edge, this time I measured out from the center, drawing a capital I that was as tall as I wanted my awning long. 
  2. I measured and drew the top and bottom lines to the correct lengths, and then connected the four corners to create the outline of the awning.
  3. Since this was a much smaller piece of material, the tie-down attachments didn’t need to be quite as robust; a loop of strong webbing, well sewn at the corners, would be good enough.

Bug Off

We had been sleeping with a standard off-the-shelf mosquito net draped over the V-berth, but it wasn’t quite the right size. No matter how much tape I used to stick it up, the net came falling down after a few nights of tossing and turning. Instead of surrounding us with netting, I wanted to build a wall that enclosed the whole V-berth.

While the sewing machine was hot, I whipped up a storage bag for the dinghy, both for the offseason and to protect it when we store it on passage, rolled up and strapped down with ratchet straps.

Tools For the Job

  • Most industrial-strength sewing machines with a walking foot can handle sailcloth and other heavy fabrics. Sailrite, Juki and Adler machines are popular options, as are older Pfaff and Singer models. 

  • Sun exposure for a given project will inform your choice of thread. “We use a 200-denier PTFE or Teflon thread because it’s impervious to UV or any chemicals, and lasts the life of the fabric or even longer,” says Mark Hood.

  • You’ll need a sharp-point needle in the 20- to 23-gauge range to punch through sailcloth. Increase the gauge if you’re planning to sew through more than a few layers. 

  • Sailcloth is tough stuff, so you’ll need a large, sharp pair of scissors to cut patterns. To get through multiple layers and reinforced panels, try a razor blade.

So don’t forget these great reminders on which tools you will need so that you can find new life for your old sails. You will need an industrial-strength sewing machine, thread, sharp-point needle in the 20 to 23 guage range, and a sailcloth.

California Police Officer Saves Dog From Burning Sailboat

Upon reaching the burning boat, he realized that in order to save the dog he would have to earn the scared animal’s trust first. As a horse trainer and all-around animal lover, Ruggles knew he was the right man for the job, and did what he could to calm the dog as the crowd watched tensely from the harbor.

“When I first got there, I reached out for the dog and he started barking and growling. So I tried to talk to him in a soft voice, and see if that would help,” Ruggles said. “He was very wide-eyed and his ears were up, so you could see how scared he was.”

Order your marine water here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

Be sure to watch our latest video on marine hot water heaters below.  

via Upcycling Your Sails

via California Police Officer Saves Dog From Burning Sailboat

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You Really Can Get Your Boat to Smell Great Again

As our long-term examination regarding sanitation hose makes its way through another long, scorching– and progressively smellier– summer season, it is actually a good time to consider methods to keep your plumbing system from turning into an olfactory horror. Listed here are simply a few of the suggestions that hose producers discussed with us when we launched our test of sanitation hose.

Hose routing: Constantly slope pipes and hoses toward the holding tank after the preliminary rise. Any type of hose is going to eventually permeate if sewage is left standing in it. If long runs are simply inevitable, think about using well-secured Schedule 40 PVC pipe– not DWV (drain-waste-vent) PVC, which has thinner walls.

Antifreeze: PVC hoses are not compatible with glycol- or alcohol-based winterizing products. The glycol or alcohol can draw out some of the PVC plasticizers, resulting in enhanced permeability and tightness. Even though the hose will certainly not fail, it may permeate.

Oil: Synthetic rubber hoses made of EPDM or butyl rubber might not endure large quantities of mineral or vegetable oil. Having said that, little amounts of oil which might find their way into a head due to owner maintenance practices must not be hazardous– but this is certainly another reason why greasing head pumps with heavy silicone grease at the beginning of every season is a much better technique than the often-suggested practice of flushing a tablespoon of vegetable oil in the head. In fact, the vegetable oil will merely quicken the grease’s washout.

Wipe test: In the event that you think a permeated hose, scrub the hose area clean, wait for several days and after that wipe the suspect hose with a moist towel and sniff the cloth. In the event that it is permeation, the odor will certainly come back soon enough.

Leaks: Even though permeation is certainly a typical cause of hose stench, it is by no means the sole cause. Slow leaks around fittings and hose clamps, and sewage that was inadequately cleaned up are likewise regular reasons; examine the ends before presuming you have a failed hose.

Hose connections: Barbs vs. smooth adapters. SeaLand, maker of the SeaLand hose brand name, is definitely a believer in smooth connections. Properly sized, the company claims, they are easier to make use of, seal better, and do much less damage to the hose. ounded profiles. Not all fittings are a good match; if fit appears too loose, consult the hose maker.

Hose lubrication for installment: A suitable lubricant could be a huge help in getting a hose installed properly. Read the hose specifications to be certain the lube is appropriate. EPDM, for example, is not suitable with petroleum, so K-Y, glycol, or glycerine are actually much better choices. Soap will work but can leave a non-drying residue that can interfere with a secure fit, particularly when utilizing non-barbed fittings.

Fit the hoses a few inches long: Hose removal often includes destruction of the hose. Providing a few extra inches to play with will streamline future repairs, rather like leaving halyards a few feet too long to allow for wear and cutting off knots.

Visit us here at http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/holding-tanks-accessories/ and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

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Your Boat Cleaning Products Experts Promote Safety In All Boating Situations 

Raritan Engineering your boat cleaning products professionals would love to share with you this week these helpful tips for surviving areas with high tsunami potential.

The first step to survival is preparation, and we hope sharing the Neal’s insights and firsthand experience will help others cruising tsunami-prone waters to be better prepared in the event of an earthquake.

From Mahina Expeditions:

As sailors, we need to be aware of the ever present threat of a tsunami. By establishing emergency procedures for your crew and vessel along with knowing what to expect and what to do in the event of a tsunami, it will be far less likely that you or your crew will become casualties or that your vessel will sustain damage.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Tsunami Warning Center is located at Ewa Beach, Hawaii. They have seafloor and coastal sensors located around the Pacific, but after an earthquake, it takes them at least 12-15 minutes to analyze data to determine whether there is the potential for a tsunami.

When Ashore in a Coastal Location

In any coastal location, always note the tidal range and times. If you ever see the sea level receding lower than normal, realize that this is the natural warning sign of an approaching tsunami. 

A tsunami can strike anywhere along most of the U.S. coastline. The most destructive tsunamis have occurred along the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Hawaii.

Earthquake-induced movement of the ocean floor most often generates tsunamis. If a major earthquake or landslide occurs close to shore, the first wave in a series could reach the beach in a few minutes, even before a warning is issued. 

Your Boat Cleaning Products Specialists Know That Having an Emergency Kit For Your Family s Crucial

Tsunami Preparedness Checklist

  • Your boat cleaning products analysts suggest that you make a disaster supply kit and have a family emergency plan.
  • Talk to everyone in your household about what to do if a tsunami occurs. Create and practice an evacuation plan for your family. 
  • If the school evacuation plan requires you to pick your children up from school or from another location. Be aware telephone lines during a tsunami watch or warning may be overloaded and routes to and from schools may be jammed.
  • Knowing your community’s warning systems and disaster plans, including evacuation routes.
  • Know the height of your street above sea level and the distance of your street from the coast or other high-risk waters.

During a Tsunami

  • Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities and evacuate immediately. Take your animals with you.
  • Move inland to higher ground immediately. Pick areas 100 feet (30 meters) above sea level or go as far as 2 miles (3 kilometers) inland, away from the coastline. If you cannot get this high or far, go as high or far as you can. Every foot inland or upward may make a difference.
  • Stay away from the beach. Never go down to the beach to watch a tsunami come in. If you can see the wave you are too close to escape it. 

When Aboard

If you are docked and experience an earthquake or rapidly receding water, immediately start your engine, cut your docklines and motor at full speed to water deeper than 150 feet. 

At Anchor

If you are at anchor and experience an earthquake or rapidly receding water, immediately start your engine, raise your anchor and get to deeper water. In the 2009 tsunami that hit Niuatoputapu, friends aboard a 39-foot sloop tried to raise anchor immediately after the earthquake but found their chain wrapped around a coral head, so they let out all of their chain. 

When leaving the boat

Here are some priorities to quickly grab:

1. Passports, cash and credit cards

2. Iridium satellite phone

3. Cell phone

4. VHF hand held radio (this proved very helpful in Samoa)

5. Flashlights

6. Knapsack

7. Water bottle

8. Granola bars or similar foods

9. Necessary prescription medicines

10. Running shoes

11. Jacket

Visit us here http://www.raritaneng.com/category-pages/cleaners/ at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have everything to take care of your marine supply needs.

via Earthquake and Tsunami Awareness and Response

via Prepare For a Tsunami

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Your Seacock Specialists Caution That Boats Can Sink Even If Something Bad Doesn’t Happen 

Raritan Engineering your seacocks professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to keep your boat from sinking while its docked.

A boat shouldn’t sink ­unless something ­really bad happens, right? Your seacock analysts know that a high-speed collision, a fiery fuel explosion, a ­direct strike by lightning — these events ­certainly can sink a boat. 

Studies of insurance claims by BoatU.S. back this up, showing that more than two-thirds of recreational-boat sinkings happen at the dock or on a mooring. BoatU.S. further ­estimates that only 35 percent of such sinkings are out of an owner’s hands.

The (Not Always) Mighty Bilge Pump

A bilge pump can really save the day in the event of an unexpected gusher, and it’s great for cleaning up the condensation and other unavoidable drips and drops that collect in the bilge. 

Do Winter Right

When it comes to winterizing, an ounce of prevention can be worth gallons and gallons of cure. Ice can damage hoses below the waterline, strainer baskets and through-hull valves. Water can contaminate the gear lube during the boating season — if it freezes, it can crack metal and blow seals. 

Your Boat is Full of Holes

Not to be an alarmist, but your boat is likely already full of holes below the waterline. These can include holes for a drain plug, mounting bolts, transducers, sensors, through-hull valves and other items. In a perfect world, these — and any downstream hose clamps, fittings and strainers — would all be properly fastened, sealed and/or clamped to keep water out. And they likely were when the boat was brand-new. 

Come visit us at Raritan Engineering because we have all the seacocks for all your sanitation needs.

Be Good to Your Bellows

Your seacock experts feel that the bellows maintain their watertight seal while allowing the drive to turn side to side and trim up and down, but these repeated movements can eventually result in tearing from fatigue. Age and deterioration can cause the rubber to break down over time, especially if exposed to heat or other harsh conditions. 

One Drop at a Time

One below-the-waterline hole that deserves special attention is the opening where the propeller shaft passes through on an inboard boat. This will often be sealed with a few rings of packing material and a tightening gland all nicely referred to as the “stuffing box.” 

Batten Down the Hatches

This simple step would prevent countless sinkings. At some point, it is going to rain. If the hatches leak — ­especially cockpit hatches where rainwater can accumulate — then we can end up with water in the bilge, an overwhelmed bilge pump, and a progressive sinking situation. 

Good Lines

A falling tide can easily trap a boat beneath a dock, where it will fill up with water as the tide rises — often leaving it hanging on its side by its lines. Good dock-line ­technique can save the day. 

Weighty Issues

It’s not uncommon to see a boat with cockpit scuppers or freeing ports designed to sit barely above the waterline once people, gear and fuel are aboard. Now replace that two-stroke outboard with a heavier-by-200-pounds four-stroke and watch the scuppers sink down to the ­waterline before people and gear are aboard. 

Cockpit Crisis

There have also been a surprising number of sinkings due to cockpit drain fittings and hose fittings leaking into the bilge. Sometimes these are routed through the bilge area with little to no access, making it difficult to ensure hose clamps are tight and the hose is in good condition. 

Doh!

Of course, there are always a few bonehead mistakes that send boats to the bottom every year. Forgetting the drain plug when launching, forgetting to tighten the lid after cleaning a strainer, and leaving a shore hose running on deck after cleaning have all resulted in multiple dockside sinkers. 

Choose your marine supplies here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine supply needs.

via 10 Ways to Prevent Your Boat From Sinking Dockside

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