Why It Might Be Good to Get a Captain’s License 

Raritan Engineering Company your TruDesign specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how time spent on the water doesn’t always translate into safe boating. 

Your TruDesign professionals discuss how as a professional sailor, coach and instructor of captain’s courses, I work with sailors of all levels of experience. I have come to notice that many of them have no professional certifications from recognized organizations like the US Coast Guard or Royal Yachting Association.

Reasons range from “I don’t have time” to “I don’t see the point, I already have the job,” and even “I already know everything in those courses, I have sailed 50,000 miles since I was a kid.”

Time on the water does not necessarily translate into safe boating behavior. That is why I believe that all coaches and professional sailors, that is, hired mariners, should obtain a captain’s license for a multitude of reasons that go beyond the title of obtaining your “ticket.”

It propagates safety.

Getting a license does not make you perfect by any means. What it does is make you better than you were before you started the process. Isn’t that the goal of a great professional? Many sailors do not even have a basic understanding of the Rules of the Road outside of the racing rules. 

Other Great Reasons to Get Your Captain’s License

We are proud to be your TruDesign supplier. Check us out at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of our marine sanitation supply needs.

Furthermore, with our modern reliance on technology, I have come across professionals who do not use paper charts. The carrying of paper charts, for example, is just one way that all boaters can be safe in the event of a loss of GPS or power. 

Leading by example.

We all look to our coaches to be the leader of the program. But often in the states, we see kids go straight from the junior sailing program to the coach boat without proper training in powerboat safety. 

Is it Legal?

“Why is it that yacht clubs require their launch drivers have a Coast Guard license, but don’t enforce the same requirement of their sailing instructors ferrying children back and forth on various powerboats?”

Coaches and pro-sailors are hired professionals. At Confident Captain we are of the opinion that the most far reaching compliance with U.S. law is that all hired professional mariners must have a license.

There is always something to learn.

The best sailors I’ve met have made it a point to keep learning for their entire career. There is more to formalized training than the pencil and the chart. The interaction between professional mariners at Confident Captain during any of our courses has always brought the most valuable lessons and insight to the table. 

It is better to be proactive towards answering difficult questions.

It won’t sit well with anybody involved in the investigation. Take a proactive step toward fortifying your career ahead of time by getting a license and engaging in different types of formalized professional development. If your good name is called into question, you will be glad you did.

So don’t forget these great reasons to consider getting your captain’s license. 1) Doing so propagates safety;  2) you can set a good example for our younger sailors;  and 3) remember that there is always something to learn.

Staying With The Boat And Other Safety Myths

I’m amazed at how long bad advice perpetuates when it’s given in a catchy phrase. An example: Don’t leave the boat until the boat leaves you. This might be the most misguided advice ever to cross the lips of otherwise sensible men and women. Another example: Red sky at night, sailor’s delight.

These stick around not because they are always true, but because they sound good. Don’t be fooled. The ocean is no place for absolutes, even when they rhyme.

Order your TruDesign part here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

Be sure to watch our latest video on TruDesign below. 

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Great Ways to Keep Yourself Out of Trouble While Sailing

Raritan Engineering Company your seacocks specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to sail yourself out of big trouble. 

Pinwheel Avoidance

Your seacocks manufacturers talk about how this one’s a classic: If you’re the outside boat of a group approaching the leeward mark and blindly carry on with pace, you’ll sail extra distance in bad air, carry wide around the mark, and then exit in a terrible lane. 

Once you’ve slowed, let the pinwheel unfold, and watch as the boats swinging around the outside become pinned and stuck in bad air. These boats had room on you, but because they are now pinned wide from the mark, they can no longer make a tight ­rounding and close you out.

One cautionary note: When slowing down and waiting for your opportunity to round inside, there might be boats coming up from behind with no room who want to speed into the gap you’re ­shooting for. 

Overstand Recovery

Overstanding a mark is a big no-no, but we still end up doing it from time to time. The key to recovery is to start hauling butt, getting to the mark as quickly as possible. Upwind, you need to put the bow down, but in medium and heavy air, cracking off causes too much heel, so depower the rig — traveler down, backstay on, hike hard, and scoot back about a foot on the rail.

Check out our stock of seacocks for your sanitation needs here at Raritan Engineering, where we always have what you need.

Downwind, if the lane is clear, sail high and fast toward the leeward mark. If sailing higher puts you in the dirty air from boats ahead, sail low to keep your air clear as long as possible, then heat it up late near the mark. 

Ducking another boat

The goal when ducking another boat is to minimize loss, and if done well, possibly even pass them on the next crossing. To duck well, generate extra speed by bearing off and then taking advantage of the small lift as you cross close to the other boat’s transom.

What if it appears the other boat will leebow you and you want to continue? If you’re in a lightweight boat with good maneuverability, try a late duck, which will keep from giving away your intentions and possibly freeze them.

On heavier and bigger boats, bear away early and generate as much speed as possible. If they tack to leebow and you have tons of speed, you can head up firmly and smoothly, gliding above closehauled for a while and creating a lateral gap. m, with enough of a gap to hold your lane.

So don’t forget these great tips on how to sail yourself out of big trouble. 1) Pinwheel avoidance;  2) outstand recovery and 3) ducking another boat.

Couple who sold everything to sail around the world lost it all when their boat sank after just two days at sea

A couple who packed in the rat race to sail around the world for life had their dreams dashed when their boat capsized after just two days at sea.

Tanner Broadwell, 26, and Nikki Walsh, 24, from Colorado, sold everything they had to buy the vessel that would given them an adventure they would never forget.

But it became immemorable for the wrong reasons when their craft tipped over off the coast of Florida when it struck a foreign object.

They lost everything in just 20 minutes when the houseboat sank along John’s Pass, near Tampa, after the keel had been ripped from the base of the boat.

Tanner and Nikki were forced to jump overboard and were left with just $90 (£65) to their name as well as their two-year-old Pug named Remy.

The couple were bored with their rat-race lifestyle at home and wanted an adventure 

Now they have no jobs, no savings and nowhere to go, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

“I sold everything I had to do this,” Tanner said, “and I lost everything in a matter of 20 minutes.”

The couple had sold all their worldly goods last year after making the decision to sail around the world.

Tanner and Nikki forked out $5,000 for the 28-foot-long sailboat they named Lagniappe, and the same again to fix it up.

Tanner and Nikki paid out more than £7,000 to buy and do up their sailboat they named Lagniappe (Image: Facebook)
 
But it all went wrong when their boat capsized at sea off the coast of Florida. “We got so tired of that lifestyle,” Tanner said, “of doing things to make people do the things they don’t want to do.”

The pair, who initially had no sailing experience, got busy doing up the boat and on Tuesday set sail from Tarpon Springs in Florida for their adventure.

“Everybody gave us a nice farewell off the docks.”

The next day they passed by Clearwater Beach and made their way to John’s Pass to dock for the night.

But the couple have vowed to set sail on another adventure again in the future.

“I’m not going to give up now,” Broadwell said. “I’m going to get another boat down the road.”

“We can’t just give up on our dreams,” Walsh said.

Choose your Raritan marine products here, and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

Be sure to watch our latest video on seacocks below. 

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Cheap and Easy Boat Cleaners You Can Make At Home

Raritan Engineering would like to share with you this week some great information about how to make your own boat cleaners.

Your marine toilet systems experts talk about how if you’ve got a locker full of nearly empty black-streak cleaners, waterline-stain cleaners, mildew preventers, bilge cleaners, and boat soaps, now is your chance to retire them all and reduce your cleaning arsenal to just four or five products that can fit in a small bucket.

This is not our first foray into the topic homemade maintenance supplies.  A few years back we dug into the topic of homemade bronze polishes and found a couple of concoctions that proved their mettle—so to speak.

Home brew No. 1: Salt and vinegar paste

Recipe: Dissolve 3 teaspoons of salt into 1 cup of white vinegar. Add enough flour to make a paste, then scoop the paste onto a clean sponge and polish. Rinse with hot water and buff dry with a soft cloth. Result: This polish worked surprisingly well. all and earned a rating of “Good” on our test scale.

Home brew No. 2: lemon paste

Recipe: Polish with a soft cloth soaked in a solution of lemon juice and baking soda, or sprinkle baking soda on a slice of lemon and scrub. (We made a paste as in Brew No. 1.) Result: After the mini-volcanic reaction of mixing lemon juice and baking soda settled down, the resulting paste powered off the stains exceptionally well with minimal scrubbing.

Home brew No. 3, Morris’ Mix:

Recipe: Subscriber Scott A. Morris makes his polish by blending polishing compound (not rubbing compound) with a small amount of silicone car wax—according to Morris, a little experimentation will yield your best mix. Result: “Fair to Good” overall, however, it took a bit of rubbing to clean our nasty bronze.

Benefits of Making Your Own Boat Cleaners

Your marine toilet systems professionals discuss how overall, the results in the home brew category were pretty impressive, particularly considering that the first two have all natural ingredients and that all three are economical to make. While the Brews Nos. 1 and 2 cleaned the bronze, they lacked the “luster” of products such as the Miracle cloth.

Of all the homebrew recipes we’ve tested, the one we’re most pleased with is our One-Penny mildew cleaner/preventer, which tester Drew Frye has tested extensively on his boat. We tried two formulas creatively named Formula A and Formula B, which cost just pennies to make.

Formula A

1 quart hot water

1 tablespoon baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)

2 tablespoons washing soda (sodium carbonate)

2 tablespoons trisodium phosphate (TSP)

Much like Concrobium (which it is modeled after), our homemade Formula A removed the mildew from test carpet on board and kept it away, even though the area got wet again. It was also very effective in the moist-environment lab test.

Formula B

1 quart hot water

2 tablespoons baking soda

2 tablespoons Borax

1 tablespoon TSP

Formula B was the second-place performer overall in our test of mildew sprays. It was certainly the best value. It cleaned well, prevented mildew from returning to the carpet, and greatly slowed mildew infection in the moist-environment test in the lab.

So don’t forget these ways to make your own boat cleaners. 1) Salt and vinegar paste;  2) lemon paste;  and 3) blending polishing compound (not rubbing compound) with a small amount of silicone car wax.

How to Fish Midge Patterns With Style

You’ve probably been there. Two hours from home, halfway through the thermos of coffee, knee-deep in cold water on a cold day, and not a single, solitary fish to show for it. They’re taunting you.

The most likely answer? Midges. Nine times out of ten, when you see so many rings that it looks like the result of an invisible hail-storm, the trout are hitting midges.

But one thing is very clear: trout love to eat midges. Your average brown trout in a midge hatch is like a fat kid with a bowl full of M&Ms. Although each of the bugs may not make much of a meal, a river is like a conveyor belt that delivers thousands of the tiny morsels to a fish. Midge hatches are especially prolific in tailwaters, those rivers kept at constant refrigeration by bottom-release dams.

Midges are usually small, but they aren’t necessarily microscopic. A size 18 barbless hook will provide satisfactory results in most situations. An angler carrying a small midge box with a series of tried-and-true patterns from size 18 down to size 22, with a very few smaller, will be equipped to handle 90 percent of the midge fishing situations out there. Generally speaking, big midges will allow you to use more complex patterns, such as the Copper John. For really tiny midges, stick to the simple stuff.

Try cutting the leader where you want the shot to stop sliding, and then knot it back together with a simple double surgeon’s knot. Crimp the shot above the knot and let it slide on down; the knot will keep the shot from hugging your fly.

A better bet, though, would be one of the new breed of vertical emergers based on the Quigley’s Cripple, such as the JLC Midge. Douse these flies with floatant and lube up your tippet for several feet. You won’t have the advantage of the split shot to keep your line taught and your chances of popping your tippet go up considerably, so be gentle.

Midge fishing in the winter time can be an angler’s only chance to avoid going stir-crazy. When your favorite freestone is snowed in, and your dog won’t even budge off the hearth, bundle up tight, load that thermos, and find a sunny piece of slow water down behind a dam in the valley.

Check us out here at http://raritaneng.com/ and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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Your Boat Cleaning Products Specialists Discuss How to Make Your Own Water Filter

Raritan Engineering your boat cleaning products suppliers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding DIY water filter ideas for your boat.

Your boat cleaning products distributors talks about how one of the first things that you realize after a few seasons of cruising is that approaches to life aboard vary between two wide extremes: cruisers who by choice or because of a limited budget live with minimal creature comforts, and those cruisers who sacrifice little more than living space when they move aboard.

Nick reported that most cruising boats he met during his first year of tropical cruising had some type of watermaker, but usually chose to take advantage of the local water supply when dockside or anchored in polluted harbors. When we were cruising abroad in the early ’90s, it seemed that less than half the boats we met regularly used watermakers.

The Nitty Gritty

All shore-sourced water supplies, either in the U.S. or overseas, contain particulate matter. This may be pipe scale, sand, small bits of grass, or other types of sediment. While not necessarily harmful, sediment builds up in your boat’s plumbing. It can settle in the bottom of tanks, only to get stirred up during an offshore passage. Over time, it can wreak havoc with water pumps, destroy ceramic water fixture cartridges, and prevent the seating of rubber faucet washers.

Nick learned this the hard way when his Grohe faucets started leaking after two years. Fortunately, replacing the cartridges was easy—once he found them—but after that experience, he became determined to reduce sediment in the entire water system.

Protecting Your Water Pumps

Your boat cleaning products experts talk about how if you do have a more sensitive impellor-type pump on your boat, protection is relatively simple. Just install an in-line sediment strainer just upstream from your freshwater pressure pump. Nick used a Par Pumpgard filter, positioned to be easily accessible for routine checking and cleaning. This is a compact, small-capacity stainless-steel mesh strainer in a clear plastic housing. Most of the toilets in our recent toilet test came with these filters, as safeguards against pump damage. They are relatively cheap—about $20 at any marine store.

A Simple Pre-Filter

In Grenada, Nick ran into a couple on a well-equipped Baba 35 who pre-filtered shore water before it even got to the boat, and he later adopted that approach. On a trip back to the States, he picked up a $20 Omni filter housing at a home supply store. GE makes a similar one, as well. The one Nick bought uses standard 9.5-inch filter elements, which he found available worldwide. For a few dollars more, you can get a clear filter housing that allows you to monitor the state of the filter element more easily.

Total cost of this handy gadget today is about $45, including a couple of spare 30-micron sediment filter cartridges. Flow rate through the filter is about four gallons per minute, so it provides minimal increase in your watering time.

Serious Filtration

All the drinking water aboard Nick’s Calypso, even the water they made themselves, went through a General Ecology Seagull IV purification system. This expensive filtering system—list price is over $700—will remove just about everything harmful from water, according to the manufacturer. Any water considered “bacteriologically acceptable for treatment” by the U.S. Public Health Service standards can be rendered safe by the Seagull IV.

So don’t forget these helpful tips for making your own water filter for your boat. 1) If you do have a more sensitive impeller-type pump on your boat, protection is relatively simple;  2) using simple pre-filters can be very cheap;  and 3) install an in-line sediment strainer just upstream from your freshwater pressure pump.

Boat Cleaning Tips

Some boat owners go overboard (pardon the pun) when it comes to cleaning their boats. They seem to spend more time scrubbing and polishing their vessels than actually cruising or fishing in them. While keeping a craft clean is definitely an important aspect of boat ownership, it’s not necessary to spend long, backbreaking hours to keep your boat looking like new. You simply have to equip yourself with the right tools/products and clean your boat regularly and efficiently. 

Choose the Right Cleaning Equipment

Before selecting your cleaning equipment and products, consider the type of boat you have and its composition. This will ensure that you have the right tools and materials in hand for the job. Choose cleaning brushes that are sturdy and will get rid of stubborn dirt, grime and salt, without damaging the finish or gel coat on your boat. A long, sturdy handle on a scrub brush will allow you to reach hard-to-clean areas without bending down, provide leverage, and help eliminate strain on your back and arms.

Select a Good, Environmentally-Friendly Soap

For marine use, you’ll want to select a soap that will be tough on dirt, grime, salt and fish blood, yet easy on the environment. Don’t use the same soap you would for cleaning dishes at home. Instead, select an effective, biodegradable cleaning agent with a neutral pH factor. If you use your craft in salt water, it’s especially important to use soap and fresh water to completely remove the corrosive salt build-up that can eat away at your boat. 

Soak Things Up

Use soft drying cloths that are highly absorbent and will soak up water without stripping or scratching. Chamois cloths or drying mops made of chamois material are good choices. To avoid “spotting,” be sure to dry off your boat immediately after washing and rinsing.

Wax On, Wax Off

Once you have dried off your boat completely, you may want to apply a quality wax and buff to shine and protect the fiberglass. It’s not really necessary to wax your boat after every use, but this should be done at least once or twice during the season to preserve the luster of the hull and protect against the elements and impurities. Use a quality carnauba wax and apply several coats

Making Your Metal Shine

There are many quality cleaners and sealants available for keeping the chrome and stainless steel on your boat protected, shiny and bright. After applying a light film on your brightwork, let sit for about 15 to 30 minutes. Then, wipe off with a clean cloth. After cleaning, you may also want to apply a quality wax sealer/protectant to create a protective barrier against the harsh elements.

Vinyl Upholstery

First, clean off your boat’s vinyl upholstery with a damp cloth to remove grime, dirt and salt. You may want to follow this by applying a quality vinyl cleaners/protectant and again wiping off the surface. Once the upholstery is free of dirt and grime, apply a light film of spray-on furniture polish and wipe with a clean cloth. This should help guard against stains and preserve the life of your boat’s upholstery. 

Cleaning/Greasing Your Engine

It’s important to make cleaning your boat’s engine part of your annual winterization ritual at the end of the season. Some boat owners choose to do this themselves, while others opt to have this done, along with other winterization tasks, by an experienced mechanic. A quality engine cleaner/protectant, such as WD-40 or Boeshield T-9, used in combination with a cleaning cloth, is usually sufficient for removing accumulated dirt, grime and grease. 

Visit us at http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/cleaners/ and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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Teamwork – Lara Dallman-Weiss hikes it with the team. Photo by Stephen Cloutier.

Your Marine Holding Tanks Professionals Discuss Steps You Need to Take to Go Full-Time

Raritan Engineering your marine holding tanks specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to make sailing your full time hobby.

Your marine holding tanks manufacturers talk about how I was told four years ago that the only way to move up from being a “green” sailor is to race every single day. Dedicating many hours to the sport contributes to building the instincts that a well-rounded sailor possesses. Here are some of the lessons I learned and advice for other enthusiastic sailors wanting to take their sailing to the next level.

KNOW YOURSELF 

Know yourself well enough to play up your strengths and improve on your weaknesses. Are you introverted or extroverted? Understanding my personality type helped me determine which teams I would have a good rapport with, which I found necessary in creating effective communication on the boat.

Another important aspect of knowing yourself is to recognize what you have fun doing and how it contributes to the program. Is an early morning walk to clean the boat, rig, and sort sails fun? Or is your style staying late and checking off work list items? Even with a full-time boat captain, everyone on the team should pull their weight in ways they enjoy.

FIND A LOVE 

Determine what you love beyond the sport. Finding common interests will connect you to other like-minded athletes in the sport and provide you with a healthy outlet from the constant grind of racing and endless travel. For me, it’s caring for the environment. I relish helping with a beach clean-up, but others might choose to volunteer with youth programs, rig specific systems for handicapped boats, take a team leadership course, become a certified judge, or attend weather classes.

Browse through our holding tanks selection here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

SKILLS 

Learn the language and develop a wide range of skills. Master the bow, repair sails, know how to fix a broken engine, service a winch, become versed in meteorology; but, never stop learning! These skills are helpful for both inshore and offshore sailing and add to your value as a professional sailor. 

SOCIAL

It is important to find a balance between pushing your limits and relaxation. Even if it’s not your style, force yourself to attend post-racing events or join in on the popular evening activities. Tent parties and joining others at the bar offer opportunities to network.

PHYSICAL 

Part of staying relevant in the field is by pulling your weight physically. It quickly gets old when others complain about sore backs and knees. Good nutrition and regular stretching are worth the investment. You should start both at as young of an age as possible. Balance and strength are important for high-level competition, and joint and nerve health are worth investing in. 

SUPPORT 

Develop a support system of both males and females in the industry with whom you can build trust. There will be times when you need to vent, and it’s healthy to have someone who will say, “Yes, I’ve been through that, too.” These friends will help you find teams that need crew, help set your expectations, and help share costs if you need to split a hotel or cab. My rule is to race only with teams that have at least one person who knows me as an athlete. 

TAKE NOTES 

It wasn’t until I returned to a specific sailing venue for the second time that I realized how important it is to keep a sailing record. Find a system that works for you and keep specific notes for boats sailed and venues raced. Keep track of specific boat setups for conditions that day and any discoveries the team made. The next time I return to that venue or boat, I will have an easy refresh before practice and can quickly email notes to new teammates. 

MONEY

If you don’t have a flexible full time job and if you’re either too green to ask for pay or plan to keep your amateur status, finding short-term ways to make money while still being available is critical.  Learn your worth by talking to peers in the industry about what they charge so you know you’re playing fair. Before you negotiate, have a sense for the number you feel good about making, so you aren’t left feeling overworked and underpaid. At the same time, be mindful not to overcharge and break the trust of the owner.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers when considering if you can make sailing your full time hobby. 1) Understanding my personality type helped me determine which teams I would have a good rapport with;  2) determine what you love beyond the sport;  and 3) it is important to find a balance between pushing your limits and relaxation.

What Type of Boat is Right for You?

Cruiser, bowrider, freshwater fishing, runabout, sailboat, saltwater fishing, speed boat, trawler, pontoon, or watersports boats – which is right for you? We’ll help you make the best choice.

Whether you’re a beginner boater who’s still trying to figure out basic boat terminology or an old salt who stays in tune with the latest boat design trends, you probably know that choosing the ideal boat for you and your family is no simple endeavor. Different kinds of boats can be broken down into dozens and dozens of categories, but chances are that no matter what you enjoy doing out on the water, one of these top 10 choices is going to fit the bill:

Bowriders, cruisers, freshwater fishing boats, runabouts, or sailboats?

Bowriders are one of the most popular types of boats on the water. It’s no wonder—this versatile design can be used for everything from simple day-tripping to water skiing. And while in the past bowriders were limited in size and scope, recently we’ve seen a push towards larger and larger models, often with accommodations ranging from enclosed heads to full-blown cabins. The most extreme example is the Four Winns H440, a monstrous boat with a bow cockpit accessed by walking through a saloon with niceties like a full galley and a settee. Other large bowriders that have hit the market recently include the Sea Ray 350 SLX and the Cruisers Yachts 328 Bowrider.

The cruiser class encompasses a wide range of different styles and sizes. In its most basic form, a cruiser is any powerboat with overnight accommodations, a galley, and the range to take you to new and distant ports. They generally have relatively fast cruising speeds (or they’d likely fall into the trawler category) and they can range anywhere from 30’ or so on up into the 100’ mega-yacht sizes. Most are powered with inboards, stern drives, or pod drives, although there are also a few outboard-powered cruisers out there.

Whether you want to go casting for bass or trolling for lake trout, a freshwater fishing boat is a must-have. And while there are numerous sub-categories and specialized, species-specific boats out there, we’re going to break this category down into three main choices that encompass the range: bass boats, multi-species boats, and aluminum fishing boats.

Whether you’re on a lake in Arizona or a bay on the Atlantic Seaboard, you’re probably going to see plenty of pontoon boats. Instead of riding on a fiberglass hull, these boats have two or sometimes three aluminum “logs” they float upon. Once upon a time they were slow and pokey, rather ugly, and not very seaworthy, but these are all problems of the past. Today, pontoon boats can be fast, slick-looking, and shockingly comfortable to ride on.

True, they still aren’t the best pick for bodies of water that regularly experience large waves. But they’re extremely stable, they have gobs of deck space, and their modular nature means you can choose from endless seating arrangements and even add things like wet-bars, towing arches, and more. Check out the Premier Sunsation 270, for example, and you’ll discover a double-decker, triple-log pontoon with twin Yamaha F300 outboards and a water slide that shoots you into the lake from the second story.

The term “runabout” is really a catch-all that includes everything from bowriders to combination ski-and-fish boats to small speed boats. The thing these all share in common is that they’re small, open boats intended for day use in fair weather. And while their exposed nature will be considered a drawback by some boaters, it should be considered an advantage, too—you don’t buy a boat to get away from the sunshine and spray, do you?

Well, have you made up your mind? Have you culled through all these choices, and landed on a winner? If so, congratulations—now get busy, and start boat shopping. If not, we’re jealous. Because the only way to really know which boat’s best for you is to get out on the water, and try ‘em out. So again we say congratulations—your indecision means that now, you need to go out on as many different boats as possible, as often as possible, until you make up your mind. Good luck, dear boater, and have fun. Lots and lots of fun.

Purchase your marine items here and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

Be sure to watch our latest video on marine holding tanks below. 

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Your Marine Sanitation Experts Share Tips for Kayak Fishing

Raritan Engineering your marine sanitation professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the success of kayak fishing.

With the stealth of a ninja, Kevin Whitley eased the kayak between two pilings in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel. He dropped the bait straight down. Instantly the fiddler crab was thumped by a big sheepshead, and the tug-of-war was on.

There was a time when Whitley, known on the water as “Kayak Kevin,” would have drawn strange looks for his narrow, 15-foot piece of floating plastic. But the area’s kayak fishing scene has exploded. 

“We have the water for it,” said Cory Routh, who runs a kayak fishing guide service and was one of TKAA’s early members. “So … I’m not surprised by the rise in interest at all.”

“I have a bit of a gypsy mentality and thought about taking up hiking,” Whitley said. “But my ankles and legs aren’t hiking quality. I could paddle, though.”

Burnley was targeting the diversity of fish in the lower Chesapeake Bay and had built a small following of anglers who enjoyed the quiet of paddling, the sounds of waves lapping against plastic, the splashing of a fish right at your side.

Whitley went after the sport with a passion some found surprising, given his previous lack of interest in fishing.

The Kayak Fishing Trend Going Around

Marine sanitation is critical on your vessel, so be sure to check us out here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

The kayak fishing scene seems to have grown locally in conjunction with the increasing popularity of small recording devices like GoPro cameras. Anglers often mount them on their bow, on a pole from the stern or on their hat. 

“The production quality of some of the stuff is mind-blowing,” Routh said. “Go to YouTube these days – there’s no shortage of quality video being produced by kayak anglers.”

Kayaks don’t require boat ramps, and they can take you into hard-to-reach spots, including skinny water (3 feet deep or less) where you can find feeding speckled trout and puppy drum, among other species. 

And while a gas boat and gear can run you several thousands of dollars, beginners can usually get decent starter kayaks for about $1,000. Annual upkeep is far less expensive, as well.

But for many anglers, like Whitley, the most appealing aspect of kayak fishing is its connection to nature. Being on a small craft, close to the water, you can hear everything and see everything. The fishing is almost secondary.

So don’t forget these great reasons to try kayak fishing. 1) Affordability. There are a wide range of price points for kayaks, almost all are more affordable than a traditional boat with a motor;  2) accessibility;  and 3) low maintenance.

Sailing Is a Sport for You!

Sailing clubs can be found on the coast, rivers and inland lakes in some spectacular locations around the country. There are nearly 400 sailing clubs around Australia with more than 60,000 registered club members and 100,000 people regularly participating in the sport.

You don’t need to own a boat to enjoy sailing. There are clubs that provide boats and boat owners looking for crew. 

Different types of sailing

There are many different types of sailing to choose from:

  • Social sailing – Non-competitive participation that involves just going for a sail.
  • Cruising – A form of social sailing where a destination to sail to is selected.
  • Racing – A number of boats going round a course in a competitive structure. There are different levels of competition, from more social or introductory racing through to serious national and international regattas.
  • Ocean racing – A form of competitive sailing that takes place off-shore. One of the most famous ocean racing events in the world is the Rolex Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

Types of sail boats

All About Boats

Having some knowledge of the different types of boats available will help you decide what type of sailing best suits you.

Sailing Terminology

Sailors use traditional nautical terms for the parts of or directions on a vessel: starboard (right), port (left), forward or fore (front), aft or abaft (rearward), bow (forward part of the hull), stern (aft part of the hull), and beam (the widest part).

Like many sports, sailing offers a pathway for new participants to use as a guide to building experience, skills and confidence.

The Sailing Pathway has 10 steps and is applicable to participants of all backgrounds, ages and abilities, in different types of boats. 

Safety

Safety plays an important part in all sports, none more so than sailing.

Weather is an important factor of sailing, not so much the temperature or how sunny it will be, but the wind strength and direction.

The challenge of racing other boats is what appeals to many sailors.

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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Experts Discuss the Excitement of Sailing

Raritan Engineering your marine hot water heaters specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be interest to you this month regarding how sailing is never boring.

Your marine hot water heaters manufacturers discuss how unlike a lot of other sports and activities, sailing offers a wide variety of ways to enjoy it. Tennis is tennis, skiing is skiing, hockey is hockey, golf is golf. But sailing means many different things.

Ranging from distance sailing to closed course racing, W-L racing, round the island(s), pursuit racing, shorthanded sailing, single-handed, day races, overnight races, premier bucket list races, even iceboating, the list of ways to enjoy sailing goes on. However, most of us end up gravitating to one type of sailing and do it over and over again, typically in the same place(s).

It is no wonder that we have trouble keeping people in the sport, there is an epidemic of “sameness”. I am guilty of this myself by organizing the same races we have done for years. Time for some changes.

We Talk About Why You Should Give Sailing a Second Chance

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Reverse the order of starts, change the course layout, try downwind starts for a change, you get the idea. Have a race where a junior sailor has to helm, or maybe a whole team of juniors? Maybe a surprise race where the sailors don’t know what the format will be until they show up to race.

There must be many things we can try and see what our sailors like and don’t like…but even those that don’t stick will still offer something new. The talk at the bar afterward might be more interesting too.

When you’re done with the preparations, you leave the harbor and hoist up the sails. You turn off the noisy, vibrating engine, after which there’s no sound except for the wailing of the wind and the sound of the sea. I always start smiling at that point. The boat speeds up, starts to list and everything comes to life. 

When you’re on the water, you have an unbridled sense of freedom and opportunity, as you can always continue to see what lies on the other side of the horizon. Not only do you feel a strong connection to the elements and nature, but to the entire world. 

All in all, to me, it’s about being removed from a mundane environment, feeling fully mentally connected with something else, be it the sea, the boat or the crew, with a constant state of shared Flow going on and realizing that everything stated above can take you most of the way to anywhere on this planet of ours.

So don’t forget these great reasons why sailing is way more exciting than you think. 1) There are so many things you can do while on a sailboat;  2) don’t get stuck on just one way of sailing;  3) be willing to be a thrill seeker.

4 Reasons Why Sailing is a Fun Family Activity

Clear water, sunshine, and good winds. These are the three essential elements needed for a perfect day out sailing. And guess what? Malaysia has three of these elements in abundance. 

Although sailing is often regarded as a man’s sport, it can still be children-friendly, making it apt for a fun family activity. Here are four reasons why sailing should be your next family activity:

1. Perfect family bonding session

As the world is moving at a much faster pace than it used to, people are spending less time with one another. Everyone is busy trying to survive the rat race that they forget to relax and enjoy life. As such, participating in a family activity can be a good way to jazz up your life while building and maintaining your relationship with others. 

2. Teaches kids new skills

Most people think sailing is solely for adults. Although it’s a sport that sees plenty of adult participation, it can still be enjoyed by tiny humans as well. It’s not only a good hobby for kids, it also teaches them a few essential life skills as well. One of the most important skills that can be learned through sailing is undoubtedly self-confidence. 

3. Meet like-minded people

What better way to meet like-minded people then to participate in an exhilarating activity like sailing? Just like any sports out there, sailing is a great way to meet people of similar interests as you. It allows you to share information or learn a thing or two about sailing from your other buddies. Besides that, it also makes a good family day outing. 

4. An escape from the city

Living in the city comes with its perks – better quality of living, higher salary, and top-notch facilities, just to name a few. However, it’s also stressful, busy, and frustrating at times. As such, when you’re tired of living in the hustle and bustle of the city and in dire need of an escape, sailing is one of the best ways to do it. The ocean is the most peaceful place you and your family could ask for as none of you have to deal with the crowd, traffic, and pollution of the city. 

So, the next time you’re thinking of a family outing, opt for sailing as it can be extremely fun and exciting, and at the same time it relaxes your body, mind, and soul.

Order your marine water heater here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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Your Marine Ice Makers Suppliers Share Great Ways to Get Your New Crew Into Gear

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to train new crew members and how to keep them happy.

Your marine ice makers experts talk about how crew integration is one of the toughest challenges, especially in classes that allow a mix of amateurs and pros. The goal is to create a team dynamic that allows the team to develop with the right amount of pushing. It’s equally important to remember that while every amateur wants to win, keeping it fun, and racing at a high level is not easy. 

1. Commitment to the process of teaching and learning.
It is unrealistic to expect a team member with a regular job to get on a boat and do everything exactly right the first time. As we rotate team members in and out we first help the person identify the three priorities of their job for each maneuver, focusing on keeping it simple. 

2. Communication.

Follows the same theme above, but in the heat of the moment there won’t be time to communicate what’s required, so being proactive with the coms about “what’s next” and making sure that everybody is dialed in allows for smooth execution. Remember sailing is a learned sport and everybody does things slightly different. 

3. Practice and managing expectations.
Is it reasonable to expect to win if you don’t practice? No. Plain and simple. If the expectation is to win, then practice will be required. When putting together a mixed team of amateurs and pros, don’t have a lot of rotation in the intense boat handling positions. Onboard Barking Mad we sailed with the same pit girl for 10 years.  

Loyalty among the crew is prized above all say many boat owners, but loyalty among crew doesn’t come without a little effort on the part of the boat owner. 

Organizing custom gear that looks sharp and clearly identifies a crew to a boat is a great way to build crew pride. 

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To go along with Woodruff’s advice, here are our top 5 simple ways to keep your crew happy on and off the water:

  1. Keep them fed and watered: Of all the expenses an owner can incur with boat ownership, skimping on lunch is not the place to save a dime. Bring enough food to the boat to keep them (and yourself) going all day, including quick snacks like cookies, nuts, or chips. But you don’t have to spend $150 per regatta on gourmet sandwiches either—talk to your crew to find out what they like. 

  2. Order team gear: Nothing says team like a uniform. It’s important to have crew that gets along together and is enthusiastic about going sailing. Custom crew gear that looks sharp and clearly identifies a crew to a boat is a great way to build pride. And a proud crew is a crew that will prioritize going sailing with you. 

  3. Don’t micromanage: We all make mistakes, but nobody likes to feel like they’re under a microscope all the time. One of the most common complaints made among the crew about their boat owner and helmsman is, “He’s a great driver, if only he’d focus on that.” If your crew is new and needs some extra training, schedule a practice session. 

  4. Draw from your crew’s talents: Corinthian sailing crews come from all walks of life and bring all kinds of experience to your boat. Talk to your crew and find out what they’re good at. Do you have a graphic designer in your midst? Ask them to design a new team t-shirt. 

  5. Organize onshore events: The onshore social element is a huge part of why many sailors join Corinthian crews. Taking your crew out for a team dinner at the end of Rolex Big Boat or any other big regatta is a great way to say thanks. 

Hey crews: This isn’t a one-way street. There are a lot things you can do to let your boat owner know you appreciate the opportunity to go sailing and show them you’re an invaluable member of the team. 

At the end of the day, racing together is a huge commitment for the owner, crew, and their family and friends. Making everyone feel like a valued member of the team goes a long way to creating a successful program.

So don’t forget these reminders for training your new crew members and keeping them happy. 1) Keep them fed and watered;  2) commitment to the process of teaching and learning is needed;  and 3) good communication.

Man’s Inability To Reverse With Trailer Providing Great Entertainment To Everybody At Boat Ramp

“Left hand down, mate,” he yelled from the jetty.

“Yeah keep going. Nah go back up and straighten out, mate. Yeah, woo! Now come down slower.”

Nat Wilmott is trying to keep the peace down at the Betoota Sailing Club boat ramp – but he’s having a little bit of trouble.

The line this morning was nearing ten trailers and a sunburnt Betoota Grove financier was trying and failing spectacularly to launch his boat into Lake Yamma Yamma.

In the dry desert heat, people were getting frustrated.

But not everyone.

Those not in the line, the jetty fisherman and the like, we’re all laughing at the expense of Peter Mantits, a somewhat likable private fund manager at Macquarie Private Wealth in the French Quarter.

“Mate, you’re fucking useless!” screamed one bloke from beside the boat ramp.

“Do you want me to do it, mate? I’ve never driven a Merc before, but. Is the big silver cunt an auto or what?”

But that was when Nat, the owner-operator of the Betoota Sailing Club Tackle Shop, stepped in to help.

Peter had fallen into the trap of boat ownership without first thinking to master the art of reversing down a boat ramp – something he regrets now.

“It looks easy enough, to reverse a trailer, but it’s not,” said Peter.

“Then this nice old man, Nathan I think his name was, coached me through it and I ultimately got the thing in the water,”

“The whole episode certainly entertained these South Betoota mouthbreathers. Leering at me from the edge of the boat ramp.”

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via Man’s Inability To Reverse With Trailer Providing Great Entertainment To Everybody At Boat Ramp

Your Marine Water Heater Manufacturers Discuss the Importance of Good Boat Ergonomics

Raritan Engineering your marine water heaters suppliers would like to share with you this week some great information about ways to maintain great boat ergonomics.

With more than four decades in the business of designing and building boats, Catalina Yachts chief engineer and designer Gerry Douglas has had a front row seat to the ongoing evolution of yacht design. He also has a strong view on how and why some designs meant for the cruising sailor can go awry. As Douglas points out, many new and used boats being touted as ideal cruisers are strongly influenced by the various measurement systems for offshore racing. 

There are many obvious, common sense reasons why it’s not a good idea to use a successful racing yacht as a template for  a boat that will be used strictly for cruising. Winning ocean racing boats are usually fully crewed, actively helmed, and seldom serve as long-term homes for their owners or crew. 

A cross-over racer-cruiser could certainly indulge in some of the go-fast features we addressed in our August 2015 article on high-performance cruisers. 

We Talk About Addressing Mobility Limits for Older Ones When Boating

Your marine water heaters distributors discuss how in the February 2016 report on boat ergonomics, PS tester Drew Frye examined how many of the new boats appearing at the U.S. sailboat shows seem to have put very little thought into addressing the mobility limits of people over age 55, who represent a larger share of their customer base. 

As PS Technical Editor Ralph Naranjo, author of “The Art of Seamanship,” pointed out in his report on sailboat cockpit design, one look at the average navigation station or helm seat on a cruising boat and you can see how the most basic ergonomic principles on lines of sight, sitting posture, standing posture are, so it seems, utterly ignored. 

Building a boat to fit the human body does not need to be any more expensive than building one that does not. But it needs to begin early, in the design phase. Traffic flow, work stations, sitting stations all need to be taken into account before hull and liner plugs are built. 

If you have some modifications you’ve made to your own boat to make it more comfortable to work and live on, we’d like to hear about them.

So don’t forget these great pointers when trying to maintain good boating ergonomics. 1) Safety can never be overrated;  2) building a boat to fit the human body does not have to be expensive;  and 3) don’t procrastinate.

Something is different at First Landing State Park and the change should help keep the river clean

Soon the area around the 64th Street Boat Ramp at First Landing State Park in Virginia Beach won’t be working against the health of the Lynnhaven River, but with it.

Until now rainwater runoff from the big paved lot where cars, boats and trailers park, has drained right into the river, carrying oil and gas from automobiles along with other debris.

As of Friday, visitors will be surprised to see the scrubby, bare area between the parking lot and the water has been covered in cardboard and mulched to prepare it for a buffer garden installation of native plants in spring, said Trista Imrich, restoration coordinator for Lynnhaven River Now.

Native grasses and native wildflowers with strong thirsty roots that grow well at the water’s edge will help absorb rainwater run-off, Imrich said.

Volunteers with Lynnhaven River Now spent a rainy, snowy, windy Friday morning laying the cardboard to kill the weeds growing there and then spreading mulch to prepare for the new plants. 

In April, children from the group’s Growing Wetlands in the Classroom program will plant native grasses, like salt meadow cordgrass, near the water’s edge and native wildflowers, like New England asters and seaside goldenrod, back from the water.

Working with First Landing State Park, Lynnhaven Rive Now also has plans to build a gazebo in spring where visitors will be able to find educational materials on the value of buffers to keep the river clean, Imrich noted.

A new parking lot is also in the works for the future.  It will be built of pavers, which will allow rainwater to filter through rather than run off. 

Check us out at http://www.raritaneng.com and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

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