Your Macerating Pump Specialists Give You the Big Edge in Big Boat Racing 

Raritan Engineering Company your macerating pump analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding big strategies for big boats.

Your macerating pump experts know that my first superyacht race was in France in 2008 on a 112-foot Swan, and the first tactical call of the week was whether to race with the spare anchor, 300 feet of chain, and the Jet Ski, which we discovered in the bow locker. Lighter boats are faster boats, of course, but we quickly learned that when the boat weighs north of 200,000 pounds, it’s best to focus on sailing safely and not upsetting the captain by making him leave the toys on the dock.

Your marine parts plus professionals know that very few superyachts are built with racing performance as a top priority. The key to racing them successfully, therefore, is to understand the limitations we have to work with. That’s the fun of it, too, because there are always plenty of hands on deck. 

Once we heeled enough to get the leeward rail wet, which was around 14 knots of breeze, we could sail well to our handicap. In 15 knots and flat water, we could finish a tack in about one minute and 20 seconds. Your marine parts online analysts feel that the tacking angle was around 110 degrees, which isn’t too bad for a 320-ton ship. Light air was a different story. In less than 10 knots, the tacking angle was more like 130.

When the wind was up, we had one shot at sheeting the genoa on after a tack. If we tried to sheet harder, once the genoa was fully pressed, the computer would tell the captive winch to ease instead of trim because the loads were too high.

The start of a superyacht race is simple but rarely easy. Organizers wisely set up the races in either a pursuit format, where the boats start in order of handicap performance (slowest to fastest), or on a staggered-start format (typically two-minute gaps), with a handicap applied after the finish.

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Your Macerating Pump Professionals Help You Avoid the Kiss of Death

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine hardware at Raritan Engineering.

Well, that was the kiss of death. Your marine hardware specialists say that they started on starboard but were about 30 seconds late. Pretty good timing for the 500-plus-ton Perini Navi, but it presented a significant problem for us, as we were committed to our timing two minutes out. 

While doing so, we had to honor a mandatory 40-meter safety gap and still head up around the other boat’s transom to clear the starboard end of the line. The only way to slow our beast was to ease everything and bear away to a near flat run. By the time we got cooking again toward the starting line, we were more than 45 seconds late for our start and had completely screwed up the boat behind us.

Your marine parts near me experts say that in reality, tacticians and drivers get puckered when the boats get less than a boat length from each other, because it takes a shockingly long time to execute course changes. The last thing an owner wants is to be on SportsCenter’s highlights reel. 

Tactically, the play is for the faster boat to sail directly at the transom of the slower boat and put a man on the bow with a digital range finder and a communications unit, relaying distance to the afterguard in the cockpit. 

It’s essential to decide well ahead of the intersection how to approach each boat. It’s also beneficial to know which ones are happy to let you through quickly (perhaps they are scored in a separate class) and which ones won’t roll over without a fight. For a slower boat, the tactical game is based on sailing smart and minimizing the effect of the bigger boats as they stream past. 

Just as Mirabella V rolled us, 50 meters to windward, the captain of our boat remarked that Mirabella V had the tallest mast in the world. 

Nearly all the top racing superyachts have a playbook of maneuvers, which are ­updated each regatta so everyone on the crew knows where to be positioned for hoists, sets and drops. On Marie we had a five-­minute countdown to the kite drop that we rarely deviated from. 

Pulling 1,600 square meters of spinnaker cloth from the water, with 40 of your friends on board, is not a winning move.

Raritan Engineering has more information on macerating pumps, marine hardware, and marine water heaters.

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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Specialists Help You Take Good Care of Your Outboards

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding outboard motor painting tips.

Today, your marine hot water heaters experts know that many outboard motors are available in colors to complement the shade of your boat. Honda, Mercury and Suzuki, for example, all offer their outboards in at least two colors; Evinrude lets you add custom side plates and accents from a wide spectrum of color choices.

There are also companies that paint motors. The Miami-based Outboard Paint Shop, for instance, will paint an outboard in the 250 to 400 hp range for $1,200.

Yet there is a more economical, DIY option. The proprietary Quantum paint system from Engineered Marine Coatings (EMC2) utilizes a hybrid acrylic- polyester topcoat — a technology developed for the aerospace industry — to create an extremely durable and professional-looking finish.

Disassemble and Wash

Remove the cowl, the shroud from the midsection, and any plastic pieces or appliques that might interfere with the painting process. Remove the rubber seal around the bottom of the cowl and any other rubber grommets or gaskets that might interfere with painting exterior surfaces. 

2. Prep and Mask

Sand all surfaces to be painted with 350- to 400-grit sandpaper. Use a power sander on broad surfaces, but you might need to hand-sand hard-to-reach spots such as around the bracket and lower unit. 

3. Paint the Parts

Choose a windless day with low humidity and temperatures around 72 degrees. Protect the uncured finish from evening dew by starting early in the day or working in a covered area. Spray the dry surfaces with a medium coat of the Quantum 45-X-115 K adhesion promoter and let dry for five minutes. 

4. Reassemble and Debug

Allow the final coat to dry for 24 hours. Then remove all masking materials. Carefully reattach and reassemble all parts. If a bug or debris marred the finish while painting, wet-sand the spot with 1,500- to 2,000-grit wet sandpaper until the blemish is eliminated and the desired smoothness is achieved. 

How Many Cans?

Each Quantum 2K kit can be custom packed based on your motor size. It includes Quantum SR-002 Surface Prep/Clean, Quantum Adhesion Promoter, Quantum 2KA spray cans, rags, gloves, Scotch pad, tape and draping. 

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Professionals Equip You With the Skills You Need

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice makers at Raritan Engineering.

Painting Outboard Parts

First off, your marine ice makers know that it is best that you do not plan any outings for at least 2 weeks when undertaking this task. Initially, it will take some time, especially if you are going to try to repaint parts on the powerhead. 

Keep in mind – Aerosol paint jobs are no where near as durable as a paint job done with quality paint from a gravity fed spray gun.

With Aerosol Can Paint

Here are the steps.

Items you need:

  1. Quality primer (self etching), paint, and clear coat.
  2. clear workspace
  3. wet sandpaper – 400, 800, 1000 – 2000 (available at automotive shops)
  4. Quality Rubbing / Polishing compound (3M Perfect-it II) removes fines scratches
  5. Plenty of time and patience.

Try to use a sanding block on flat surfaces and keep the pressure even. For other areas, you can obtain paint remover from local shops but it takes time to remove. It works great for those recessed areas, but it is messy and toxic.

Raritan Engineering Company has more information on marine hot water heaters, marine ice makers, and any marine sanitation device.

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Your Marine Ice Makers Professionals Describe the Easiest Way to Use Natural Forces to Your Advantage 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to find the best angle of attack while sailing.

Your marine ice makers experts feel that there are many ways to describe the forces around sails — in fact, around any foil. One of the most straightforward ways is to split the forces into lift and drag. The lift force is, by definition, perpendicular to the apparent-wind direction; drag is parallel to it. The primary way to get more lift from a sail is to increase its angle of attack. More lift is more power.

Two ways to increase a sail’s angle of attack: trim it, or turn the bow off the wind (fall off) without easing the sails. The most important thing to know about angle of attack is the greater it is — or to put this another way, the more the sail deflects the airflow — the greater will be the lift, up to a point.

As discussed in a previous chapter the leading edge of the flat plate requires the wind to make an abrupt turn around it. Aft of the separation bubble, this abrupt turn causes the wind to change direction severely, which raises the likelihood that the boundary layer will separate from the foil. Correct camber provides a gentler turn. 

Go to http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/ice-makers/icerette-automatic-icecube-maker/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance with purchasing marine ice makers at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine ice makers specialists understand that sail trim is, however, a balancing act. Too much camber also can present problems, as the flow has difficulty staying attached to a deeply curved section. With too much camber, the likelihood is that it will separate — the nice, even curve above becomes an abrupt hairpin — and the flow will depart prematurely from the sail.

For sailors, the practical reality of this discussion is that creating lift is a cinch. All it requires is oversheeting the sails or sailing a course too low for the sail settings (both of which increase angle of attack), or sailing with sails that are too full (show too much camber) for the conditions. Unfortunately, sail trim is not so easy because its undesirable cohort — drag — offsets lift. Reducing drag, primarily because it is so difficult to see, is the tough part.

The genoa’s luff telltales are rough indicators of where you are in terms of lift and drag, at least from the perspective of angle of attack. As we now know, this is most important in terms of sail trim. 

The result is that the lift-to-drag ratio is lower. Keep increasing the angle of attack (trim the sails more or fall off the wind without easing them), and the boundary layer separates, and the total flow can stall. This can be seen in Diagram C with both telltales drooping.

For example, in smooth water and medium air, if the main is trimmed such that its lift-to-drag ratio decreases, that loss could be more than offset by a higher angle of attack from the rudder, or from the fact that more of the total force created is turned into drive force. 

Bear in mind that this discussion focuses on sailing upwind. When sailing very low downwind (high apparent-wind) angles, the name of the game is to increase drag or to stop the flow of wind. 

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Your Marine Sanitation Device Analysts Say That Quality Is Worth the Money 

Raritan Engineering would love to share with you this week amazing information on how you can gain the needed knowledge in choosing the best anchor for your needs.

Each time Practical Sailor conducts an anchor test, we get questions about the materials used in anchors, particularly stainless steel. Stainless steel is much less prone to unsightly and destructive oxidation than mild steel, even when it has been hot-dipped galvanized and protected by a heat-bonded zinc coating.

Unfortunately, zinc is a relatively soft metal. As an anchor rubs and scrapes the bottom in its normal operation,the galvanized coating is damaged, mild steel uncovered, and oxidation begins. In many cases, however, rust can be a good friend, announcing to the skipper, with an undeniable bold red stain and flaking metal, that corrosion is taking place. 

Even when shackle or swivel approaches failure, its surface patina may hardly change at all. The metal also tends to work-harden, and when submerged for long periods, suffers from oxygen starvation. Thus, its shiny appearance may have made it the diamond earring of anchor alternatives, but the same looks and assumed good quality, throughout the fatigue cycle, can present problems. 

Design plays an important role in how well an anchor holds a vessel in place, and how well the anchor itself holds together. In essence, it’s a fairly simple structure, and it provides a good lesson in how loads migrate through a material and where stress accumulates. The shank, like the handle of a frying pan, transmits the energy into the main structure, and the junction between the handle and pan or shank and fluke is where a significant stress riser develops. Engineers know that stress escalates at the point where a flexing arm attaches to an immovable body.

When a vessel is dancing to the thrum of a building gale, the surging loads imposed on the anchor shank vary in both intensity and angle, and when the fluke(s) of the anchor ends up wedged in a rocky outcrop or pinned in a coral pothole, the anchor’s shank and the fluke(s) themselves need to be rugged enough to handle loads imposed.

Your Marine Sanitation Device Experts Help You Gain the Confidence to Make the Right Choice

Your marine sanitation device specialists know that many bluewater veterans swear by U.S.-made galvanized mild steel shackles and chain, and agree that swivels, although a necessity for mooring pendants, should be omitted from anchor rodes. 

How to choose the right anchor

Until the 1930s, there was little choice when it came to purchasing an anchor, the Fisherman being just about the only type available. 

There was no alternative to the Fisherman anchor until Yachting Monthly published Sir Geoffrey Ingram Taylor’s design for the CQR in 1934

The Main Key attributes of a good anchor

1. Materials

Most anchors are galvanized steel

Most anchors are steel, galvanized for corrosion resistance. The carbon content should be below 0.21% to ensure ductility at all likely temperatures.

Aluminum is good for kedge anchors

Aluminum and stainless steel anchors require either sophisticated alloying or clever design features, such as hollow shanks, to obtain sufficient strength. This makes them expensive. 

2. Weight

However, the excellent performance of various types of aluminum anchor, both in tests and in the real world, shows quite clearly that weight is not necessarily a prerequisite for good holding power. It is a truism that anchors are marketed by weight but they hold by their area. Most modern anchors have a lot more surface area than older types of the same weight.

Learn more from Raritan Engineering about the importance of choosing the right marine sanitation devices for your needs.

via Is Stainless Steel Really the Best Metal for Use in an Anchor?

Model-87-IceMaker

 

Your Marine Supplies Professionals Make Your Ice Maker Search Easy

Raritan Icerette Model 87

How Amazing Are Our Ice Makers?

Raritan’s Icemaker will withstand high humidity and extreme temperature changes when exposed on deck and still keep producing ice.

Raritan utilizes the Embrako compressor in our Icemaker as its been proven to be extremely reliable in all types of marine environments, coming with a 5 yr limited warranty. 

Easy Installation

– No drain required makes it easy to install.
– Requires a 1/4” outside diameter water line.
– Includes flange.
– 230 volt model available.

Get Your Marine Ice Maker Today!

 

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Your Marine Hardware Professionals Build Appreciation of the Marvel of Superyachts

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hardware experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to become a great superyacht sailor.

Your marine hardware specialists know that it’s impossible to appreciate the marvel of a superyacht until you see one up close. It’s breathtaking to watch one charge by under full sails that are spoken of in acres rather than square feet.

Composites, carbon rigs, 70-ton captive winches the size of small automobiles, and hydraulic advances have all contributed to the acceleration of superyacht racing. In lockstep have been the wardrobes, blends of best-available aramids and carbon. 

What is the limit? As the guy who has ­delivered a few of the biggest superyacht sails ever made, Robbie Doyle has been asked this very question many times. “How big a sail can we build? It’s an open question,” he says. Take, for example, the 195-foot Perini Navi Perseus3

Go to http://raritaneng.com/marine-hardware/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine hardware at Raritan Engineering.

Unfurled, says Zebny, is the first super­yacht its size to use in-boom furling with a square-top mainsail, which itself is new territory. Your marine hardware professionals know the challenge of stowing Unfurled’s massive head panel, with its gaff batten and big bits of hardware, was solved by the sailors. In collaboration with Southern Spars, the team developed a system that requires only two crew members to hook up or stow the headboard car. 

By trouble, he means toppling nearly 200 feet of carbon craftsmanship, which is something boat captains don’t appreciate. “One thing to keep in mind with these monsters is keeping efficient sail plans,” says Doyle, who wrestles with owner demands for bigger sails. “So much of the boat becomes inefficient. 

It’s also now standard procedure to be ­involved in a new build from the outset, says Zebny, taking into account how an owner really intends to sail the boat, what kind of inventory the full-time crew can manage, and making sure the deck layout fits the sails.

Regatta organizers are getting better at putting like boats together on the racecourse, says Christensen, who works with Hasso Plattner’s 147-footer, Visione. Zebny says progress has been made at the shipyards, too, where hydraulic packages now allow the boats to be sailed more efficiently in stronger winds. “­Until the last five years, you couldn’t sail a new boat in 20 knots because the gearing wasn’t up to it,” he says. “Unfurled is huge and we often sail it around the course like a 40-footer — well, almost.”

North Sails’ more durable 3Di cloth allows programs like Unfurled to have a single mainsail and only two jibs (“A big one and a little one,” says Zebny.). Doyle Sailmakers’ Stratis and ICE offerings were developed to address durability but also weight and practicality. 

“In the old days, you’d have to have a ton of leech hollow on a 100 percent jib to support itself,” says Zebny. “Now we just build it with a straight leech, stick these battens on there, and it makes a better-performing sail.”

One obstacle come race day, however, is deciding which jib to have on deck. Moving a half-ton brick of sail from below requires more than a bunch of big, strong men. On Unfurled, they use a halyard to extract what they need from the tender locker underneath the teak foredeck.

“Big furling sails are now easily handled by two people instead of having a big bag on the deck that weighs 500 kilos and requires six people to deal with it,” says Zebny. Cable manufacturers also like the spool system, says Christensen, because the cables aren’t forced into tight-radius bends that result when furled sails are snaked into deck bags.

Spinnaker snuffers are therefore the most reliable option, and C-Tech makes the most widely used inflatable units. “Typically, we start the day with the snuffer at the head of the sail and use the new zipper systems,” says Zebny. “[On Unfurled] we hoist the sail zipped, so the first set is a normal set. 

That’s what gets the owner more ­value out of his boat, he adds, and keeps him coming back for more and possibly even going bigger and faster. Good or bad, says Doyle, the racing is more pro-driven than ever ­before, as is the sail-handling. 

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information regarding marine hardware and any of your marine products needs.

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Your Marine Water Heater Analysts Help Defend Against Many Types of Mold

Raritan Engineering Company your marine water heaters specialists would like to share with you this week some great information regarding free and easy mildew growth prevention tips.

I’ve been growing several interesting varieties of mold and mildew at home. It is glamorous work, I know. While my wife, Theresa, disagrees, I know that you understand.

This Practical Sailor project led me to our last test of mildew cleaners, and some helpful tips for keeping mildew at bay.

Having been closely involved in our mildew cleaner test and the upcoming report on spray-on mildew “shields” that supposedly prevent mildew growth, I’m convinced that sprays can help fight mold, but these shouldn’t be your first weapon against it.

The best way to fight mildew onboard is to keep it from ever starting in the first place. Prevention is your best defense. When storing your boat or leaving it closed up for an extended time, a few simple steps will help prevent mildew.

Leave open all drawers, doors, and lockers to promote circulation. If covering the boat with a tarp, create ventilation between the tarp and the hull by hanging a few fenders between them. 

At the dock, a home dehumidifier, a dehumidifying stick (like the Golden Rod, effectively a small heater), or even a light bulb positioned under a vent can help promote air circulation and moisture removal.

Your Marine Water Heaters Experts Suggest Using Ventilation Products

Ventilation products

We’re big fans of cowl vents coupled with Dorade boxes (PS May 15, 1997) to let air in but keep water out. Your marine water heaters professionals know that a Dorade box is simply a water trap that employs a down-draft pipe offset laterally from the throat of the cowl vent. Vetus supplies a wide range of well-made cowl ventilators.

Twelve-volt fans (PS April 2008) and solar-powered vents (PS May 1, 1993) also keep fresh air flowing in the cabin. The Hella Turbo fan outlasted three other popular models in PS’s 2000 cabin fan longevity test. It also was among the recommended fans in our 2008 test.

Sails

• Never stow sails when they are damp or salty as salt attracts moisture. (Fresh-water rinse salty sails.) Air them out regularly, especially after a rain.

• Keep mildew-infected sails away from clean ones, and try to clean infected sails as quickly as possible. Stains are easier to treat when they are new.

• Never use bleach on Kevlar or nylon as it will destroy the fibers. Washing these or Dacron sails in a chlorine-treated swimming pool will turn them brittle and yellow. 

• Laminates are sure to grow fungus more readily than woven polyester most likely because the film is impermeable and moisture is not able to escape.

Now, to see how that shower mold is growing . . .

Visit us at Raritan Engineering Company and see how you can find more information and assistance regarding marine water heaters and other marine needs.

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Your Marine Products For Sale Experts Understand That the Challenges Can Be Mentally Draining

Raritan Engineering Company your marine products for sale professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to get over those mental obstacles. 

The path to Paralympic silver medals for the US Sonar team reached a turning point at the 2016 Sailing World Cup in Hyeres, France. Your marine products for sale analysts know that going into the final day, Rick Doerr, Brad Kendall and Hugh Freund were leading, which required them to wear yellow jerseys and compete with a large yellow dot on their sail. It was a big deal, and a lengthy wind delay did nothing to calm their nerves. 

“How do I coach that?” I asked Charlie McKee, the US Sailing Team’s High Performance Director. McKee connected me with the team’s sports psychologist Jerry May, who has guided Paralympic, Olympic, and professional, athletes across many sports.

Your marine parts house specialists understand that when the stakes are high, nervous energy is also high, so the challenge I faced with my Sonar sailors was to figure out how to knock down the stress. I started with what works for me, which is to acknowledge and accept that anxiety is natural and unavoidable. 

Your Marine Products For Sale Specialists Know the Need of Maintaining Focus As a Team

You can find more information as well as get assistance on any macerating toilet at Raritan Engineering.

Your macerating toilet experts know that to refocus the team, we wrote down process-oriented goals that were about enjoying the journey of learning. For example, some of these goals were about starting:

Line sights: Check it at least three times.

Final port tack approach: Jibe onto port into a low-density area to avoid traffic.

Choose where to set up on starboard: Tack either below or beyond a pack, not in it.

Each of these goals addressed something specific that we agreed might help their starts.

Your marine parts store professionals feel that to help temper emotions and the resultant stress, we worked on instilling a culture of forgiveness. Expecting perfection, then dwelling on what went wrong and who was at fault is counterproductive. 

“Instead, use a more task-oriented word that indicates what to do to increase the probability of doing the task well.” May suggested phrases like: “Hit the start line” or “stay present.”

“Think process and tasks,” he said, and a keyword for resetting when things go wrong. Your marine parts warehouse analysts know that ours was “Helicopter,” which referred to an idea that if we dropped the team into the middle of a race from a helicopter with no knowledge of what happened in the race so far.

Ricky Doerr, Brad Kendall and Hugh Freund hung onto their yellow jersey position to win the Worlds 6 weeks later in Medemblik, Holland by coming back from an 11th at the top mark and keeping their composure to finish third in the final race. 

Raritan Engineering Company has more information on marine products for sale, macerating toilets, and macerator pumps. 

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Your Macerating Toilet Specialists Want You to Have Successful Fishing Trips

Raritan Engineering Company your macerating toilet professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the best trolling speed while offshore fishing.

Knot too fast: Your macerating toilet analysts know that proper trolling speeds can make or break a fishing trip. Washed-out baits, twisted lines and other headaches are the direct result of improper trolling. 

Speed can make or break your trolling success, and yet there’s not one single speed fishermen rely on day after day. Variables such as your heading (up-sea or down-sea), weak or strong currents you must cross, winds that vary in direction and strength, and the height of wave swells all affect your trolling speed daily.

“The best way to control speed is to watch your skirted baits and keep bumping up faster and faster, until your baits start to spin,” says Capt. Anthony Mendillo, of Keen M Sport Fishing in Isla Mujeres, Mexico.

Trolling in the Clean-Water Alley

Clean-water alleys behind the boat allow pelagics to spot your spread. Bigger boats often slow their troll to create the optimal pockets, while center-consoles can pick up the pace.

Optimal trolling placement for baits often requires finding that clean-water alley behind the boat. Bigger boats produce bigger wakes, so you need to go more slowly to get those pockets of clear water.

“Smaller center-consoles need to troll faster to produce a wake with any white water at all,” says Adam LaRosa, owner of Canyon Runner Sport Fishing in Point Pleasant, New Jersey. 

The Ripper tournament fishing team, based in Tampa, Florida, and composed of Darren Impson and Matt Taylor, fishes out of a 36-foot Yellowfin with triple Mercury Verado 350s.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/marine-toilets/seaera-et/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on macerating toilets at Raritan Engineering.

“Outboards tend to kick out more white water than inboards,” says Impson. “The faster you go, the more white water you are going to push back into the baits, and the less the fish are going to be able to see your baits.”

Don’t be afraid to play with varying speeds all day long, especially in rough sea conditions, to best present your baits.

Try Professional Trolling Patterns and Speeds

Calm surface conditions allow anglers to dictate the direction and speed of the troll. But not all days are bluebird, so fishermen must be able to react to weather patterns accordingly.

We typically fish at 9 knots, looking for that instinctive bite. Our main troll presentations include fresh bait behind plugs, using fluorocarbon leaders to get more strikes. 

When fishing with naked ballyhoo (no plugs or skirts), we troll even slower, at 4 to 5 knots. A naked ballyhoo should skip perfectly as long as it’s rigged correctly, and there is no better trolling bait out there. 

Pick Up Your Trolling Pace

Whether horse or dink, naked or skirted, ballyhoo are a staple for troll fishermen. The way in which they’re rigged directly affects how fast they can be trolled.

Anglers can get heavy with the throttle when conditions allow and they want to pick up their trolling speeds. New Jersey captains Dulanie and Lambros troll specific speeds when targeting marlin. 

If you are not using baits, you can pull plastic plugs faster, to 10 knots. “Any [speed] faster than 10 knots, [and] you typically have to fish with trolling weights and wire line in order to keep the baits down below the surface,” says Impson.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information regarding macerating toilets. 

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Your Macerator Pump Professionals Feel the Need For More Internet Speed 

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week amazing tips on how to boost your internet speed while out on the water. 

As high-speed, cellular data service extends throughout the coastal U.S. and abroad, the ability to turn your phone into a mobile hotspot (MiFi) has diminished the need for a Wi-Fi connection to a shore-based network. 

In the October 2016 issue of Practical Sailor we look at the WiriePro ($700), an integrated antenna/WiFi adapter/router that allows you to quickly connect to the internet using either a shore-based Wi-Fi network or cellular service (2G/3G/4G/LTE). 

Every sailor knows that VHF radio range is dependent upon a good-quality antenna mounted as high as possible (see “3dB VHF Antenna Test,” PS February 2007 online). 

Plug “Wi-Fi” into the search box on Practical Sailor’s website, and you’ll see a number of articles dating back to 2009 on Wi-Fi boosters and antennas. These range from do-it-yourself solutions costing less than $200 (“An Experiment in Boosting Wi-Fi the DIY Way,” PS April 2014) to our recent report on the latest trend: combination antennas that work with both broadband cellular signals (2G/3G/4G/LTE) and Wi-Fi (“Wi-Fi Booster Versus 4G Cell Data,” PS June 2016). 

One of the first Wi-Fi boosters on the scene before the recent explosion in the “marine-grade” Wi-Fi antenna/boosters, was the original Wirie, developed by Mark Kilty and Liesbet Collaert while cruising aboard their 35-foot Fountaine Pajot Tobago, Irie. The new WiriePro uses the same basic package as the original.

The main problem with most of the Wi-Fi equipment we’ve tested is durability in the marine environment. Very few carry long-term warranties. Canada-based Bitstorm is the only maker that we know of who offers and extended 3-year warranty. But just because it doesn’t have the marine label on it, doesn’t mean it won’t last. 

Your Macerator Pump Experts Say Upgrading Is Not Always Needed

Your macerator pump specialists know that the WiriePro mounts the Bullet and a 2-dBi wide-band antenna for cellular service (xG/LTE) onto a hard-shell, waterproof (IP67) box. Inside the box is a commercial-grade 2G/3G/4G/LTE router, with access to the slot for installing a cellular provider’s SIM card.

When using cellular systems, The WiriePro will work with GSM carriers worldwide using 3G/4G networks with speeds up to 21 Mbps. In areas with LTE support, speeds of up to 100 Mbps are possible. 

There are also some upgrades specifically geared toward sailors, like an optional, integral GPS ($25) that—so long as you are connected to the internet—lets friends follow you online using the free Spotwalla service. 

It took testers about a half-hour to temporarily install The WiriePro using the hardware provided. (This did not include running cables through the hull, which would have added another hour or so.) 

Most techies recognize that they can set up a Wi-Fi adapter using Ubiquiti’s Bullet for less money (as we have done ourselves), but the Bullet’s native firmware is not the easiest for a novice to manage. In fact, the more simplified interface is the main reason many users will pay more for systems from Wirie, Bitstorm, or Rogue Wave. 

Learn more from us here at Raritan Engineering this month about macerator pumps as well as other great marine products.

via A Simplified Internet Connection for Boats