Ed Hill, UK professional sailor

Your Marine Holding Tank Specialists Share Tips for Going Pro 

Raritan Engineering your marine holding tanks distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to become a professional sailor.

Your marine holding tanks suppliers talk about how he turned that regatta into a full season of sailing in Europe and then turned that season into a career. At 28, he’s just finished a six-year stint with Emirates Team New Zealand, where he was a boat captain for a number of the team’s race boats over that span, including their AC45, Extreme 40 and TP52. He’s also a highly regarded bowman. In simple terms, he has achieved his dream.

Luck, he’ll be the first to admit, has played a role. The track from talented youth sailor to successful professional is vague at best. Few sailors can successfully navigate it without some help. But luck will only get you so far. 

1- Learn a trade. With a few exceptions, virtually every member of an America’s Cup or Volvo Ocean Race sailing team will have an alternate skill that will help push the team forward. The big five are: rigging, boat building, sail making, electronics, and hydraulics. 

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2-Treat every job with respect: “It doesn’t matter what you’re doing, take whatever job you can get to get you on the next step. If your job is going in the RIB and passing on the water bottles to the sailing team, pass the water bottles on. It gets you involved with the next group of people, the next team, and it gets you exposure and experience. 

3-Create demand: “If you end up busy enough and you’ve done enough work and people really want you to sail with them, they’re going to pay for you. For me, I was working on boats and doing all these extra things and eventually I couldn’t afford to pass up non-sailing jobs to go sailing for free. 

4-“Never think too much or too little of a program. It doesn’t matter what you’re doing, or racing on, look at everything as a stepping stone and never be short-sighted.”

5-Be eager: “When I sailed with the Artemis program, I was really young and I had to work to show them I was the keenest. I would go down really early in the morning and do all my things, and do all the extra things I could find to gain their respect, because it just doesn’t happen.”

6-Check and re-check: “Double check everything you do because it costs a lot of money when you make mistakes on these boats.” While no one likes to be the cause of a short delay during a race, it’s always important to remember that a short delay to ensure everything will go properly in a maneuver will usually only cost your team a few seconds, but a mistake in the maneuver could cost minutes, if not more. 

7-Be confident: “If you don’t have confidence in yourself then no one else around you will have confidence in you.”

So don’t forget these helpful pointers when trying to become a professional sailor. 1) Learn a trade;  2) treat every job with respect;  3) create demand;  and 4) be eager.

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Darrell Nicholson

Your Boat Cleaning Products Distributors Share Great Reasons to Check and Maintain Your Tethers

Raritan Engineering your boat cleaning products suppliers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding the importance of checking your tethers.

Just as we were wrapping up the report in our December 2017 issue describing how to make your own safety tether, 60-year-old British sailor Simon Speirs went overboard and died during the Clipper Round the World Race in an accident linked to a tether safety clip failure.

Regarding the most recent incident, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, noted offshore sailor and the Clipper Race founder and chairman, was reported saying that the tether “failed in some form or another.” 

“The reason why the clip failed is under investigation, and I am not going to anticipate the findings as that could be misleading and not do yachtsmen any favours,” Knox-Johnston wrote in an e-mail to Practical Sailor.  

According to Knox-Johnston, as a precaution, all Clipper racers have now switched to a different make tether with a different safety clip. Although he did not disclose the brand of the new locking snap-hook, media photos show competitors wearing tethers with what appear to be Gibb-style safety snap-hooks, featuring the stainless steel locking gate. 

A decade ago the field was dominated by stainless steel caribiner-style hooks. The center hook has a threaded lock that works, but can be hard to manipulate in the dark or when wearing gloves. Two dual-action, locking snap hooks, the Gibb (red) and the Wichard snap hook (yellow), share a similar “flat” form like the Spinlock brand suspected to have failed in the Clipper Race.  

Practical Sailor is currently undertaking an investigation of the most common safety tether snap-hooks used by sailors and will be providing additional information as we become of aware of it. 

More Benefits of Tether Maintenance

Your boat cleaning products manufacturers discuss that except for the fact that the Clipper Race has halted the use of the Deckware Race Safety Clips aboard its boats, we have no evidence that they pose any more risk than similar designs. We will be looking into this further. 

“It was not a normal failure of a perfectly good tether, but it would be unwise to speculate until the Government (MAIB) have completed their report,” said Knox-Johnston. 

The Spinlock Deckware tether hook features a black plastic locking lever. This is the type of clip linked to a fatality in the Clipper Round the World Race.

In addition to testing the approved locking snap-hooks on the market—including the Kong Tango, the Gibb, the Spinlock, the Wichard Proline, and Wichard locking snap-hook—we are surveying sailors who use them. 

The accident offers another reason for sailors to familiarize themselves with the care and use of their inflatable lifejacket (PFD)/harness/tether combination. 

So don’t forget these tips when checking your tethers. 1) Harnesses or combination inflatable PFD/harnesses should be either on a person, hooked to your bunk, or otherwise immediately available at all times;  2)  Inspect your inflatable PFD/harness every time you put it on and self-test your inflatable at least yearly for leaks;  and 3) The hook used for connecting to jacklines and fixed points on deck should be a locking type designed for that purpose that cannot self-release.

Dolphin Tangled In Fishing Line Swims To Shore To Get Help

Folks out enjoying a day on this stretch of the Spanish coast last week likely never thought they’d end up saving a life — but that’s exactly what they did.

Inés Oliva Pérez was among a group of sunbathers on El Buzo beach, in El Puerto de Santa María, when she spotted a young dolphin stranding herself in the surf. Other people there noticed it too, and a small crowd began to gather at the waterline. 

The dolphin’s mouth was tangled in fishing line, which she had no way of removing on her own.

“It seemed she came to ask for help,” Pérez later wrote online.

Fortunately, the dolphin found the right people to offer her that assistance. As Pérez looked on, several beachgoers worked together to steady the distressed animal against the crashing waves long enough for the improperly discarded fishing gear to be cut from around her muzzle. 

As the rescued dolphin swam away, Pérez could see two other larger dolphins circling in the distance, as if they had been waiting for her return. Even as she joined them, they seemed to linger for few moments longer. In that act, Pérez perceived a sense of gratitude for what had been done to help her. 

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Image result for is my boat a lemon?

Your Marine Ice Makers Distributors Talk About How to Find Out if You’re Sailing in a Lemon

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding ways to see if your boat is a lemon.

Your marine ice makers manufacturers talk about how while many of the more than 63,000 boats damaged as a result of 2017 hurricanes will be repaired and have more years of life on the water, some used boat buyers in 2018 could end up with storm-damaged lemons. The nation’s largest advocacy, services and safety group for recreational boaters, Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS), cautions used boat buyers that some boats affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are beginning to hit the market, and that getting a prepurchase survey (called a Condition and Value survey) is very important.

“It’s not that you don’t want to buy a boat that’s been repaired, but you should have full knowledge of the repairs and know they were done correctly. It’s a transparency issue that will help you negotiate a fair price,” said BoatUS Consumer Affairs Director Charles Fort. The boating group offers eight tips to help you spot a boat that might have been badly damaged in a storm:

1. Trace the history. When a car is totaled, the title is branded as salvaged or rebuilt, and buyers know up front that there was major damage at some point in the car’s history. But only a few states brand salvaged boats – Florida and Texas do not – and some states don’t require titles for boats. Anyone wishing to obscure a boat’s history need only cross state lines to avoid detection, which can be a tipoff. Look for recent gaps in the boat’s ownership, which may mean that it was at an auction or in a repair yard for a long time.

2. Look for recent hull repairs. Especially on older boats, matching gelcoat is very difficult. Mismatched colors around a repaired area are often a giveaway and may signal nothing more than filler under the gelcoat, rather than a proper fiberglass repair.

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3. Look for new repairs or sealant at the hull-to-deck joint. Boats that bang against a dock during a storm often suffer damage there.

4. Evidence of sinking. Check for consistent corrosion on interior hardware, such as rust on all hinges and drawer pulls. You might be able to spot an interior waterline inside a locker or an area hidden behind an interior structure.

5. Corrosion in the electrical system. Corrosion on electrical items, such as lamps, connectors and behind breaker panels might mean the boat sank recently. Does the boat have all new electronics? Why?

6. Look for evidence of major interior repairs. Fresh paint or gelcoat work on the inside of the hull and engine room is usually obvious. All new cushions and curtains may be a tipoff, too.

7. Look for fresh paint on the engine. It may be covering exterior rust as well as interior damage.

8. Ask the seller: In some states, a seller isn’t required to disclose if a boat was badly damaged unless you ask. If the seller hems and haws, keep looking. 

Boating season is very short in New England, and recreational boaters want to spend as much time on the water as possible during the summer months. 

New boats will usually include a warranty from the manufacturer. Additionally, there is usually an implied warranty included in a sale by a marine dealer who regularly sells boats or other vessels. 

The consumer should give the manufacturer or dealer prompt notice of any problems that might come up. It is recommended that the boat owner keep a written record of the dates that problems occurred, the nature of the problems, and the conversations that they have with the manufacturer or dealer about the problems. 

Although each case is different, possible remedies can include canceling the sale and seeking a refund. Consumers may also be able to recover damages for the loss of use of their boat. And, federal law provides that the manufacturer or dealer might be responsible to pay the consumer’s attorney’s fees.

So don’t forget these helpful reminders when trying to determine if your boat is a lemon. 1) Always trace the history;  2) look for fresh paint on the engine; and 3) ask the seller.

Commissioned By George Washington, “Old Ironsides” Still Sailing on 220th Birthday

The USS Constitution, or “Old Ironsides,” proved today that it is still just as seaworthy as it was when first commissioned 220 years ago. On Friday morning, the warship left Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston and sailed to Fort Independence at Castle Island where it was met by the Concord Independent Battery and 101st Field Artillery Regiment from the Massachusetts National Guard. 

Upon arrival, the USS Constitution gave a 21-gun salute, which was returned by National Guard. While passing the Coast Guard station — where it was originally built — the USS Constitution gave 17 volleys of cannon fire.

The historic ship’s trip to Fort Independence and back to Boston is part of the Unites States Navy’s 242nd birthday and the Constitution‘s 220th birthday celebrations. 

Photo: U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kathryn E. Macdonald -- The USS Constitution sets sail for first time in years in Boston's waters.

The USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world. It was commissioned and named by President George Washington and set sail for the first time in 1797. Known as “Old Ironsides” for its numerous victories during the War of 1812 between the United States and the United Kingdom, the three-masted heavy frigate is a wooden warship with sides nearly two feet thick.

It was one of the first ships of the newly-created United States Navy, the successor of the Continental Navy. It was personally named by President George Washington and President John Adams, who attended its inaugural launch in 1797. 

Not only does it have all of that history, but “Old Ironsides” has a very unique distinction from other U.S. naval ships. The USS Constitution is the only remaining ship in the Navy’s fleet that has actually sunk an enemy ship. Of course, that was back in the War of 1812 — but it just adds to how impressive this two-century-old ship really is!

White oak was used for the new planks and keel, keeping with its original construction. The ship is still operated by the U.S. Navy, along with the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston, but was retired from active duty in 1855 and has been stationed at Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston since 1934. It undergoes repairs roughly every 20 years.

Visitors will also have the chance to make birthday cards for the USS Constitution, as well as make paracord bracelets for military care packages. A cannon salute will take place at 12:15 p.m. precisely to mark the first launching of “Old Ironsides” in 1797.

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Your Marine Sanitation Device Suppliers Share Tips On How to Select a Sailmaker 

Raritan Engineering your marine sanitation device manufacturers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to choose a sailmaker.

Historically, fall has been the best time to order new sails. Boat show specials abound and you have plenty of wiggle room on delivery date—at least if you are snowed in for most of the winter. But our wants and needs seem to rarely dovetail with the perfect season. 

The following article from our print archives is aimed primarily at the first-time sail-buyer. For more specific guidance on sail buying, be sure to check out our recent articles on choosing a cruising main, which includes a link to PS readers’ favorite sailmakers and list of recommended sailmakers, and “State of the Main,” a look at how the industry has dramatically changed over the past two decades.

For a one-stop comprehensive look at building a sail inventory we also have a downloadable e-book series in our bookstore. You can buy the individual e-book you need, or save on the complete three-part series that covers all the essentials as well as more esoteric sail subjects like storm sails and riding sails.

Selecting Sailmakers

You’re best off selecting up to a half-dozen candidates that make the kind of sails you want and sticking with them. In identifying them, you’ll want to consider a number of variables. If you’re a heavy-duty, serious racing fanatic, you may do well with one of the national franchise groups, particularly if you are good at it and likely to add to their victory list. 

If you are not involved in racing, you probably have a wider choice of sailmakers who will do a genuinely good job for you. You may still want to try a franchise, particularly one that has a loft close to you, though you should remember that the large companies, for the most part, got that way through their involvement with racing. 

And remember, even a phone call to Hong Kong is not likely to result in that sailmaker’s arriving on board next Saturday to check out your sails. If you are really serious about your boat, and want to get her all the best things for your Great Cruise, then you’ll probably spend a little more time on selecting the sailmaker who will be compatible with your style of sailing and your type of involvement with boats. 

Sometimes, even the advertising can be believed! Once you’ve narrowed the selection down to a manageable number, ask for an appointment to see the loft, and the opportunity to discuss how they make sails and why they recommend their methods. 

Interpreting Price Quotations

Your marine sanitation device experts discuss how sooner or later, you’ll get together the quotes on the sails you need. Unless you’ve been very specific about the exact sails you want, you may be overwhelmed by the apparent choices offered. You may also be amazed by the variation in prices for sails of a given designation, and it is easy to arrive at misleading conclusions about the cost of sails as a result. Any price quote you get should include at least the size and weight of the sail, as well as the price.

Most sailmakers will offer some incentive to place your order during their slack season on the premise that it is better to work for a small profit than not to work at all. In the Northeast, the discount season is generally October through December, the particular dates varying from one loft to another. At least one loft we know offers a sliding discount, largest in October, tapering down to smallest at year’s end. 

How big your order has to be to negotiate such a discount varies from one loft to another, and not all lofts are approachable, but if you have over $5,000 to spend, it is probably worth asking. 

Adding it Up

No discussion on buying sails would be complete without mention of quality. Of course, every sailmaker sells only the finest quality, so it is up to the buyer to determine for himself which “finest quality” sails are right for him. In fact, not all sails are made the same. Price is a guide to quality, at least to the extent that you are unlikely to buy the best sails at the lowest price. Of course, not everyone needs or wants the very best, and the budget-priced discount sailmakers certainly have a place in the “best” market if the best thing you want to say about your sails is that they didn’t cost much.

In the end, you play as great a part in getting good sails as the sailmaker himself, because ultimately, you make the crucial decisions. Providing the correct and adequate information, deciding which of the many options you want, and selecting a sailmaker you feel confident will do his best to serve you with products appropriate to your usage all are matters for you to resolve. It’s your money.

So don’t forget these helpful tips when choosing your next sailmaker. 1) If you’re a heavy-duty, serious racing fanatic, you may do well with one of the national franchise groups;  2) don’t rush in making a decision;  and 3) be very specific in asking for price quotes.

Power boats: National rowing winners helping spread the sport 

When John and Hannah Huppi met in 2007, they had three things in common: They were both from Washington — Hannah from Washington state and John from Washington, D.C. — they were both freshmen at Tulane University, and they both had an interest, but no experience, in rowing.

Ten years later, the Huppis are a young married couple who, having just competed in the World Rowing Championships in Slovenia last month — where they came in fifth — are continuing their daily mission to spur the popularity of rowing in the Crescent City.

Drawing members from as far away as Mandeville, Slidell and Baton Rouge, the New Orleans Rowing Club can be found skimming along Bayou St. John at 6 a.m. every Tuesday and Thursday and 8 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. 

“Rowing is something you can pick up in high school and continue to do into your 70s and 80s,” he said. “It’s unique in that it’s both an endurance and power sport that is also low-impact. We have a lot of people that are drawn to it as a good way to get their exercise in even with things like knee or back injuries. Plus, you get to be outside and on the water. It’s so calming, so peaceful.”

Dedicated to the sport that gave them so much, including each other, the Huppis started thinking in 2015 about the future — both their own and the future of the sport in their adopted city. It was just a year after taking over command of the New Orleans Rowing Club that the couple decided to start the first high school rowing team in New Orleans.

“The program is really attractive to students who are looking for a team environment and also may be looking to improve their chances when it comes to college admission and scholarships,” John said. “There are some great opportunities for rowing scholarships out there, and rowing is popular for both men and women at most prestigious schools.”

The hope is to instill a lifelong love of the sport in rowers who may find themselves at the New Orleans Rowing Club after college, itching to compete again, just like the Huppis did.

“Hannah and I married last year, and while we were planning the wedding, we decided that we really wanted to go to Europe, and we really wanted to get back into competition shape, so we set our sights on two big goals: the national championships in Tennessee this past August and the world championships in Slovenia this past September,” John said. “We started training really hard, and we took gold at nationals.”

Still high off their European adventure, the Huppis are gearing up for the next competition — in November, 24 members of the New Orleans Rowing Club will be competing in a race in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

“There are large rowing communities in Florida, Tennessee and Texas,” said John Huppi. Louisiana, not so much, but the Huppis are working on that.

“The plan is absolutely to make it to the world championships again next year,” said John Huppi. “How could we not when it’s going to be right in our backyard — Sarasota, Florida?”

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Outboard vs. Inboard

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Specialists Talk About the Benefits of Inboards and Outboards

Raritan Engineering your marine hot water heaters distributors would like to share with you this week these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding a discussion of whether or not inboards or outboards are better.

Your marine hot water heaters suppliers talk about why does everybody seem to want to put outboards on big boats these days? It looks crazy to hang a bracket with a pair of outboards on the transom of a good-looking, sturdy 36-foot hull designed for work or play. 

Won’t they?

Well, when semi custom boat builder Bill Judge showed up in one of his 36-foot Chesapeakes for the Annapolis Fish for a Cure tournament a couple of years ago, it was powered by a pair of 300 hp Suzuki outboards instead of the usual 480 hp Cummins inboard. 

Bill Judge has been both a boater and a boat builder all his life. He’s been building the 36 Chesapeakes for 10 years. In the beginning he sold it as a diesel inboard, but the last three years he’s powered it exclusively with Suzuki outboards.

The Boat

The Judge 36 Chesapeake is a classic. The 36-by-12-foot hull possesses a lovely flared, bow-proud semi-V Chesapeake deadrise shape. Unlike most Chesapeake boats, it has no keel, though the sharp deadrise extends back about two-thirds of the length before flowing smoothly into nearly flat (4-degree) transom sections.

Though he originally designed the Judge 36 Chesapeake for inboard power, Judge hasn’t built one with a diesel for three years; the new ones have all been powered by Suzuki 300s on brackets — except for the most recent, which runs Suzuki’s revolutionary new DF350A with contra-rotating propellers. 

The diesel inboard offers potential longer-term reliability, enhanced stability, and a longer cruising range.

Outboards provide increased speed, lower cost, the ability to trim completely out of the water, and easier maintenance access.

Performance

For the inboard model, we ran Justified, a 2012 inboard. Its owners fish but also like to cruise, so Justified is fitted with a full galley and dinette, an after-cabin bulkhead, air conditioning, and a genset. Its Cummins 480 had 1,450 hours of time when we tested. The owners love their boat and wouldn’t trade, citing its easy motion at all speeds and its fuel economy, which proved the best of our three testers. 

With twin Suzuki 300s, the 36 Chesapeake recorded a top speed of 43.6 mph at 6,000 rpm.

With a single 480 hp Cummins inboard, the 36 Chesapeake recorded a top speed of 33.6 mph at 3,400 rpm.

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Manufacturers Continue Discussing If Inboards Are Better Than Outboards

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The unnamed 36 with Suzuki 300 engines is Bill Judge’s personal boat, the first that he built with outboards. Three years old, it had about 900 hours on the motors when we tested it. This boat is lighter, rigged primarily for fishing and day-cruising with an open pilothouse. It ran noticeably higher in the water, drier and flatter, with both Interceptors and engine trim available to adjust running attitude to fit conditions. 

Bill Judge uses his 36 Chesapeake with twin Suzuki 300 outboards primarily as a fishing boat.

Outboard Versus Inboard

As we began to dig into the pros and cons of the two layouts, though, a broader picture emerged of what it would mean to live with each system over the long term. The first is purchase price. 

But won’t the inboard outlast the outboards? Maybe. But Judge states he has built outboard boats for guides who have happily put over 3,000 hours on the Suzuki engines. That translates into more than a decade for most recreational owners. 

The owners of the 36 Chesapeake inboard like to fish and take long-distance cruises at trawler speeds.

Another huge difference is ease of maintenance. The cost for oil and fluid changes is comparable until we consider the inboard’s cooling system, which requires not only periodic changing but also winterization. Fouling a line or grounding and damaging a propeller requires a diver at least and perhaps a haul-out for the inboard, while tilting an outboard makes solving most problems much easier. 

So don’t forget these helpful pointers when considering whether to buy an outboard or inboard. Outboards provide increased speed, lower cost, the ability to trim completely out of the water, and easier maintenance access.

Yanmar Launches The DTorque 111 Turbo Diesel Outboard

Following its agreement with German manufacturer Neander Shark for exclusive global distribution of the game-changing Dtorque 111 twin-cylinder 50 hp diesel outboard engine, YANMAR MARINE INTERNATIONAL (YMI) has announced the official launch of this exciting new propulsion product.    

The compact Dtorque 111 is designed to revolutionize the small workboat market where its expected lifespan of well over 10,000 hours at least doubles that of any comparable outboard gasoline engine. The Dtorque 111 offers a remarkably smooth and quiet diesel engine, delivering 50 hp at the propeller with a stunning torque output of 111 Nm at just 2,500 rpm. 

To create the Dtorque 111 the German developer and manufacturer Neander deconstructed conventional small-diesel engineering to first principles. The result is a two-cylinder common-rail turbo charged diesel engine, using a unique system of dual counter-rotating crankshafts in an aluminum block, which dramatically reduces the vibration levels that a conventional small two-cylinder diesel engine would normally generate. 

Smallest diesel outboard

The Dtorque 111 is the world’s smallest diesel outboard engine with common-rail fuel injection. This enables it to deliver an impressive performance with class-leading fuel economy and exhaust emissions that fall well within the latest EU RCD 2 limits*. .

For the past 2 years both YANMAR and Neander have been trialing pre-series outboards in six EU pilot countries. “We invited a wide cross-section of our customers around Europe to performance-test the outboards in differing sea states and loading conditions gathering as many opinions as possible,” explains Floris Lettinga, YMI Global Sales Manager.

Floris Lettinga continued, “With many commercial operators maintaining a single diesel fuel policy to avoid risk of fire and explosion, the market potential for the Dtorque 111 is highly diverse. So far, the main option for small workboat propulsion has been the gasoline outboard. No longer is that true!”

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via Outboard vs. Inboard

via YANMAR LAUNCHES THE DTORQUE 111 TURBO DIESEL OUTBOARD

PH Super Flush Marine Toilet By Raritan Engineering

PH SuperFlush – The Power Is In the Design

As a premier manufacturer of marine products, Raritan Engineering Co. Inc, is proud to introduce its latest product offering, the PH SuperFlush. Our latest configuration helps customers easily switch from competitive models and begin taking advantage of the robust and dependable design of our world renowned PHII pump. Every unit is individually assembled and tested by hand in the USA.
•Upgrading to PH SuperFlush is fast and easy! Mounting base configuration matches the bolt pattern used on most competitive toilets.
•Clear the bowl with less strokes! Our robust double-action piston pump is 66% larger than competitive models making its use quick, easy and efficient.
•Trouble free operation! Proprietary full size 1½” joker valve is specially designed to maintain pump performance.

Additional benefits include:

-Effortless pumping! Powerful telescopic lever style
handle makes pumping a breeze.

-Superior strength! Our engineered polymer pump construction is the strongest on the market.

-No more slamming seats! Capable of locking the seat in place while boat is rocking.

At Raritan, we offer dependability where it counts.
Be Sure To Get Your PH SuperFlush Marine Toilet At Raritan Engineering

Off My Dock: One In a Million

Your Marine Hose Specialists Share Great Tips For Lightning Storm Survival

Raritan Engineering your marine hose distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding safety during lightning storms.

Your marine hose suppliers discuss how they say lightning never strikes twice, but when it strikes my good friend Chuck Larson, the story gets told over and over again, and never gets old.

And the odds are actually 1 in 1.083 million in any given year, according the National Weather Service. Sounds like a long shot, but in an 80-year life span those odds increase to 1 in 13,500, which seems more probable. 

In fact, an impoundment of the Little Tennessee River was the site of the lightning strike that nailed Chuck some 20 years ago. Chuck and his cousin, Andy, and two bikini-clad friends were back in a cove when they heard thunder and rightly decided to head for home port, but when they wheeled out onto the main lake, they discovered the storm was almost upon them and coming from the direction of home. 

Many power boaters like to think that they’ve got the speed to simply outrun or get out of the way of lightning storms, or they figure they’re safe if they go boating only when it’s clear and sunny. That’s an attitude aided by the low odds of a boat being struck by lightning, which BoatU.S. pegs at about one out of 1,000 boats in any given year. No worries, right, mate?

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Wrong. Engines can malfunction; big lightning storms can leave no room to escape; sunny mornings can turn into dark, threatening afternoons. If yours is the only boat in the area during a lightning storm, the odds of being struck go way up, leaving you and your crew vulnerable to millions of volts raining down from the skies. 

Timing

A strategy of boating only on sunny, cloudless days may work well in places like Idaho and California, but that would mean almost never using the boat in places such as Florida, Louisiana and much of the Midwest. 

Absolutely, boaters should track VHF, Internet and television weather reports and make responsible decisions about whether to go boating depending on the likelihood of lightning storms. Short-term forecasts can actually be fairly good at predicting bigger storms, but small, localized storms might not be reported. 

A storm that builds directly overhead might be less obvious until those pretty white clouds that were providing some nice shade moments ago turn a threatening hue of gray as rain dumps on you and the wind starts to howl or, worse yet, boom with thunder and lightning that are right on top of each other. 

Write the Check!

On many levels, robust insurance coverage plays a huge role in your lightning-protection plan. Knowing how to avoid lighting storms and read the weather are certainly important, being ready for action in the event of a storm or strike is crucial, and an upfront investment in lightning protection can lessen destruction. 

Take it from a luxury trawler owner who sustained more than $1 million in damage from a strike: “Boat insurance turns out to be the best investment we have made in the past 10 years!” he said. “We will never again grumble about writing a check for an insurance premium.”

So don’t forget these important reminders when staying safe from lightning storms. 1) Don’t assume you have the speed to outrun a lightning storm;  2) you should track VHF, Internet and television weather reports and make responsible decisions about whether to go boating depending on the likelihood of lightning storms;  and 3) buy good insurance.

If it seems every American is doing dragon boating, you may be right. But it all started in Philadelphia

If you haven’t seen an actual dragon boat by now, chances are you’ve heard of it. Or you’ve seen pictures. Or you have a friend on a team who posts her medals on her Facebook feed.

But what most people don’t know is that the ancient Asian water competition, involving boats adorned with dragon heads, 10 pairs of paddlers, a steersperson, and a drummer, is exploding across the United States. Or that Philadelphia — where American dragon boating got its start — remains at the crest of the sport.

 
At the same time, the country’s most elite dragon boat paddlers – Team USA – are training for the world championship starting Oct. 18 in Kunming, China, with Philadelphians heavily represented on the team and its coaching staff.

There are no national statistics on dragon boat participation, because many of the festivals attract community groups or companies for short-term team building or charity drives. But places as far flung as Dexter, Ore.; Minocqua, Wis.; and Norfolk, Va., are touting first, second, or third annual dragon boat festivals. In July, the Cooper River held its second annual event, and Bucks County held its third on Sept. 23.

Among those recently drawn into the sport is Lyudmila Kuznetsova, a Philadelphia dentist who first tried paddling in May with the Dragon Ladies, a Main Line team. After a handful of practices, the Dragon Ladies raked in a women’s division gold medal at Philadelphia’s Independence Dragon Boat Regatta in June.

“For me it was a chance to be on the water,” said Kuznetsova. She loves the exercise and the social aspects of being on a team that draws on newcomers to the region.

“Sport is a life-changer for most of us,” said Marks, who for 25 years headed Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts. After breast cancer in 1998 and a double mastectomy in 2006, she joined Against the Wind, the area’s first breast cancer team, founded in 2001. It will compete in July in Florence, Italy, in the international breast cancer dragon boat festival. Global interest is so great that registration closed a year before the event.

American dragon boating began in Philadelphia in 1983 after the Hong Kong tourist bureau asked USRowing to send a team, all expenses paid.

Robert McNamara, a cash-strapped young doctor in 1984, joined the team for the free trip, he said. Two years later, he was coach of Team USA. Since then, it has won more than 100 world championship medals, including 23 golds. It also holds world records in the 500 meter: 1 minute, 48 seconds for the men’s team; 1 minute, 53 seconds for the coed team.

McNamara is on the Schuylkill several mornings a week by 5:30 before going to his job of 30 years as chief of emergency medicine at Temple University’s Lewis Katz School of Medicine.

As for its growing popularity across the country, McNamara says, “Anybody can get in a dragon boat and survive. It’s a big enough boat that balance isn’t an issue. You get on the water with a lot of other people, and it’s a lot of fun.”

Purchase your marine hose here at Raritan Engineering.

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via Off My Dock: One In a Million

via How to Survive Lightning Storms While Boating

via If it seems every American is doing dragon boating, you may be right. But it all started in Philadelphia


Marine Water Heaters Distributors at Raritan Share Ways to Install and Maintain Your Bilge Pump

Raritan Engineering your marine water heaters experts would like to share with you this week some great information regarding the ease of bilge pump installation.

The best bilge pump in the world won’t keep your boat dry if it’s not properly installed and maintained. While bilge pump installations are fairly straightforward—and definitely within the scope of DIY projects—there are several factors to consider (capacity, wire size, hose diameter, fuse size) before you begin, and there are some good rules of thumb to follow.

CHOOSING AN ELECTRIC PUMP

The first step is selecting the right bilge pump(s) for the job. We recommend installing two electric centrifugal pumps (preferably one with automatic water level sensor): a smaller pump mounted at the belly of the bilge to handle the incidental bilge water (rain, stuffing box drips, etc.) using minimum power and another pump mounted a few inches higher to handle bigger jobs. 

Capacity: For most mid-sized boats (30-35 feet in length), we’d recommend a 1,000-1,500 gallon-per-hour (GPH) pump for the primary and one with a capacity of about 2,000 GPH for the backup. 

When comparing output specs on multiple pumps, be sure the rating criteria are the same. New standards set by the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) require that compliant makers rate pump capacities so that they reflect real-world usage. The ABYC stipulates that pumps be rated with a head height (also called vertical lift) of 1 meter and a hose length of 3 meters, and with a head height of 2 meters and hose length of 6 meters. Head height is the vertical height of the hose outlet above the pump outlet. 

Key features: An automatic pump will rely on a water-level sensor such as a float switch to activate the pump. This can be a separate unit or one that is integral to the pump. This sensor should resist fouling and be easy to test for proper operation. 

INSTALLATION

The illustration above shows one recommended setup for automatic bilge pump installation.

Location: According to the ABYC, the pump inlet must be positioned so that bilge water can be removed when the boat is in a static position and when it is at maximum heel (ABYC H-22). The mounting location also should make it easy to service the pumps and to clean them, particularly their strainers.

When installing two electric pumps, the lower-capacity pump should have a built-in float switch, be mounted at the lowest point of the bilge, and be wired straight to the battery through a fuse. The higher-capacity pump is installed a few inches higher, but not directly above the smaller pump.

Plumbing: When plumbing an electric bilge pump, be sure the setup is designed to reduce head pressure as much as possible to maximize discharge capacity: use smooth hose sized to meet maker recommendations; keep hose runs as short as possible; and try to avoid bends, turns, and elbow fittings in the run. 

We Continue Talking About Easy Bilge Pump Maintenance

Your marine water heaters professionals talk about how the discharge line should rise steadily to the through-hull or loop. If there are any low spots in the run, water will pool there once the pump cycles off. This can create an airlock when the pump is activated again, and the pump likely will stall. 

Wiring: Use correct size wire and fuses: The proper wire size reduces voltage drop and properly fused wiring reduces risk of a locked rotor (a motor that’s trying to turn, but can’t) causing an overcurrent situation and potential fire hazard.

Consult the American Wire Gauge 3% voltage drop table (www.marinco.com/page/three-percent-voltage) to be sure you’re using large enough wire. 

For the fuse size, simply go by the pump maker’s recommendation, and you should be set. The fuse, per ABYC standards, should be installed within 7 inches of the power source.

Accessories: A few accessories to consider adding to the bilge pump system include a visual/audible bilge alarm, bilge switch, and a cycle counter. ABYC standards require an alarm on boats with enclosed berths. 

Automatic pumps should always be fitted with a readily accessible and clearly marked manual switch so that even if the owner isn’t around, anyone (crew, marina neighbors, or passersby) can locate and activate the switch when the need arises. 

If the larger-capacity pump has a float switch, we highly recommend connecting it to a bilge alarm (and alarm cut-off switch). That way, hopefully, the horn will get someone’s attention before the constant cycling of the pump drains your batteries. 

Two good references on bilge pumps and installing them are “This Old Boat” by Don Casey and Nigel Calder’s “Boatowner’s Mechanical and Electrical Manual.”

MAINTENANCE

Regular and frequent inspections of your bilge pumps are a must and should be included in the vessel’s overall preventative maintenance program. This helps you know when to replace worn or damaged components (bad float switches, deteriorated  hoses) before they fail. 

Keeping your bilge clean can be a hassle, but it doesn’t compare to the headache of a locked rotor or an impotent bilge pump in an emergency. 

So keep in mind these pointers when installing and maintaining your bilge pump. 1) The pump inlet must be positioned so that bilge water can be removed when the boat is in a static position;  2) when plumbing an electric bilge pump, be sure the setup is designed to reduce head pressure as much as possible to maximize discharge capacity;  and 3) This helps you know when to replace worn or damaged components (bad float switches, deteriorated  hoses) before they fail.

Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Arkup, the “avant-garde life on water” company, has designed a new luxury home that integrates solar on the roof and a newly approved lithium ion marine battery system. The main selling features are that it can rise with sea levels via jacks, withstand extreme weather, move as a regular electric propelled boat, and provide it’s own water plus – of course – electricity.

There are no specifications on the solar panels used – merely multiple notations that 30kW of panels can fit on the roof in 2,300 sq feet.

The systems are liquid or air cooled lithium ion battery kits. The individual battery packs are 5.7kW each and individual stacks go up to 137kWh. No where on the Arkup website it specific the exact number of units, however, they clearly state it is ‘customizable’ – so expect that the only limitation to stored power will be related to space.

The Orca system was recently approved by DNV GL – global ocean classification body – as being safe for maritime usage.

The Arkup is powered by an electric propulsion system – adding to Electrek’s electric boat collection. The system can move at up to 7 knots per hour with a range of 300 nautical miles. With its solar propulsion system – it could probably run indefinitely.

Two points from Arkup’s promotional material gives a feel for the market, in addition to luxury, that they’re aiming for:

Sustainable: Environmentally friendly, powered by solar energy, no fuel, zero emission, equipped with waste management, rainwater harvesting and purification systems, our living yachts are totally off-the-grid.

Resilient:  Made for all environments and designed to withstand category 4 hurricane winds, our livable yachts are equipped with a hydraulic self-elevating system to prevent from sea sickness and flooding.

Click here and see how we here at Raritan Engineering always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs. 

via Bilge Pump Installation and Maintenance Tips

via Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Your Macerating Pump Professionals Give Great Downrigger Tips For Your Next Fishing Trip 

Raritan Engineering your macerating pump distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to use downriggers to your success.

Your macerating pump suppliers talk about how fish often concentrate in a specific stratum of the water column, held there by food, temperature, and other conditions they find to their liking. This can challenge anglers who want to keep their trolling baits or lures in the zone. 

Follow Your Fish Finder

Use your fish finder to look for schools of bait and fish, as well as thermoclines that often mark as a steady line between the surface and the bottom. Any of these can signal the depth to set your lines. 

Test the Waters

Until you figure out at which level the fish are holding, run your downriggers at different depths. You can also stagger-stack two or more trolling lines on each ­downrigger by using adjustable line releases that clip onto the downrigger cable. 

Consider the Conditions

Don’t rely solely on the downrigger’s depth gauge, because boat speed and the speed/direction of the current can affect the actual trolling depth of your lure or bait. You can often observe the actual running depth of your gear on the fish-finder display and raise or lower the downrigger to get into the strike zone.

What is a downrigger & how do they work?

We pulled up on the reef at around 7 in the morning. It was a popular reef on the Gold Coast well known for its mackerel fishing. We were keen to try for a Spanish mackerel so had opted to forego the early morning bite period to try and catch some live bait that we intended to slow troll. We run 2 large live wells on our charter boat, RU4 ReeL, and they both had a good number of live slimeys swimming around in them, so we felt quietly confident even though the prime bite time was already over. 

We Continue Talking About the Benefits of Using Downriggers

How to Use Downriggers

What do they do?

Browse our macerator pumps selection here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

A down rigger is similar to an outrigger in that it places your bait where you want it away from the other baits or lures. An outrigger lifts your bait up to the surface and moves it out of the bubble trail created by your propeller and into clearer water. A Downrigger simply drops your bait down into the water column to a depth of your choice and as with an outrigger when a fish grabs the lure or bait your line pulls out of the release clip and your are thus able to fight your fish weight free and unhindered. 

How does it work?

Downriggers were originally used in large lakes to target trout and salmon. As we fisherman are an inventive mob, we eventually worked out that we could use them in other fisheries and they found there way into the saltwater. Whether they are used in fresh or salt the principle around their use remains the same. 

Once you have the line in the clip you will need to let the ball down progressively while controlling the line coming off your spool. This takes a bit of practice as the initial start up can yank the line off your reel with a sudden jolt. I apply a bit of finger pressure to the spool of my reel to ensure that I don’t get a tangle. 

When to use the Downrigger

You can catch just about anything on a Downrigger from snapper to marlin; and their uses are not limited to offshore fishing. On our charter boat we predominantly use them for targeting pelagic species like mackerel, cobia, marlin, and yellowtail kingfish; but snapper, various species of tuna and a variety of reef fish have been making up quite a respectable by-catch. 

The down rigger offers a very natural presentation and can also often tempt fish into biting that will refuse a similar bait that seems unnatural to them. 

What to use

You may have noticed that I keep referring to baits or lures when talking about down rigging. You can fish just about anything out of a down rigger either on anchor, on the drift or trolling. 

On our charter boat we use our Canon Downriggers quite closely in conjunction with our Humminbird sounders. You can clearly see the Downrigger ball on the sounder (if your transducer is mounted on the transom) so it can simply be a case of adjusting the depth of the ball to the depth that you are marking fish on your sounder. 

Downrigging is a technique that can catch you a lot of fish when others fail to produce. It is not the be all or end all of fishing techniques and as with everything will not always produce fish, but if you have never tried it or own one but don’t use it. It may well be worth the effort and you will be pleasantly surprised at the results.

So don’t forget these helpful benefits to using a downrigger on your next fishing trip. 1) You can catch just about anything on a Downrigger from snapper to marlin;  2) the down rigger offers a very natural presentation and can also often tempt fish into biting that will refuse a similar bait that seems unnatural to them;  and 3) downrigging is a technique that can catch you a lot of fish when others fail to produce.

Dolphin Tangled In Fishing Line Swims To Shore To Get Help

Folks out enjoying a day on this stretch of the Spanish coast last week likely never thought they’d end up saving a life — but that’s exactly what they did.

Inés Oliva Pérez was among a group of sunbathers on El Buzo beach, in El Puerto de Santa María, when she spotted a young dolphin stranding herself in the surf. Other people there noticed it too, and a small crowd began to gather at the waterline. But as the dolphin washed ashore, their curiosity about her surprise appearance soon turned to concern for her well-being; suddenly, it made sense why she might have approached them.

The dolphin’s mouth was tangled in fishing line, which she had no way of removing on her own.

Reserve your items here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via How to Use Downriggers

via Beginner’s Guide to Downrigger

via Dolphin Tangled In Fishing Line Swims To Shore To Get Help

Life is truly good for the crew of this Alerion 28 as they enjoy a quiet evening on the water

Electric Toilet Specialists at Raritan Discuss How to Get More Bang for Your Buck When Getting Lessons 

Raritan Engineering your electric toilets suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding great ways to get great coaching from a small budget.

Your electric toilets distributors talk about how not everyone can afford to have the top coach – or any coach – help them through their boat handling. Here are a few quick tips that can help you get the most out of your training sessions without shelling out the big bucks.

1.  Have a friend with a powerboat film your boathandling – Most of us have a friend or two with a powerboat and some free time. One of the easiest ways to get a look at your boat from outside is to enlist the help of a friend. 

2. Have your sail trimmers view trim from the powerboat – As an alternative to video taping your setup (or in addition to, depending on how much patience your friend has), have your sail trimmers observe from the chase boat for a legs to get a sense of what the sails look like from the outside. 

3. Combine your post-race of post-practice debrief with a competitor – Use the buddy system. If you have a friend sailing in your fleet, or a competitor that’s willing to talk through races with you, it can be helpful for both parties if you debrief about the day’s sailing. 

Your Electric Toilets Manufacturers Talk About Getting Good Quality Training At A Good Price

4. Have a crewmember time maneuvers with a stopwatch – Establishing a baseline by timing maneuvers is a good way to check yourself on performance. See your choice of electric toilets here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs. Once you know about how long a tack or jibe should take, you can always run against the clock to check to see how you are doing. 

5. Swap crewmembers around during a practice maneuvers – Moving crew members around will help everyone onboard get a better sense of what each position does. When your bow guy knows what to look for in the shape of the jib, he can provide better feedback to the guy grinding the headsail in at the back of the boat. 

So don’t forget these helpful pointers in getting the most of your boating lessons. 1) Have a friend with a powerboat film your boathandling;  2) have your sail trimmers view trim from the powerboat;  and 3) and combine your post-race of post-practice debrief with a competitor.

Lessons from a Long-Range Cruiser: What Tools To Take on Your Boat

We all learn from experience, or rather, we all should learn from experience. Here’s some good advice from Steve D’Antonio, who has a lot of experience cruising himself, as well as working on cruising boats as the former manager of a boatyard. The reality is that if you’re cruising offshore, you’ll have to be able to fix any problem yourself. D’Antonio’s been there, done that. 

First, he says, never leave the dock without reviewing your spare parts on board, particularly impellers, belts and fuel filters. Second, always have a good set of tools, including the most common hand tools, wrenches, sockets and screw drivers plus tools that are specific to the systems on your boat. And third, if all else fails, be able to improvise so you can jury rig a repair so you can get back home safely.

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via Lessons from a Long-Range Cruiser: What Tools To Take on Your Boat