Your Marine Parts Source Analysts Help You Strengthen Your Wifi Access 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts source specialists are excited to share with you this week this spectacular information about how to take care of your wifi needs while sailing.

As most sailors have found, trying to use a typical laptop WiFi card to connect to a marina or yacht club hotspot doesn’t cut it. A more acceptable compromise is an amplified WiFi card which can theoretically boost transmission power to about 1,000 milliwatts.

Mini’s setup uses the same amplifier as the Wirie but it costs less compared to the Wirie’s higher pricetag. The installation takes about an hour and requires no electrical know-how. Instead of using a watertight box as the Wirie does, Mini uses PVC fittings from Home Depot, which he claims are completely watertight. 

INSTALLATION DETAILS

Amplified WiFi Card: The card is an Alfa AWUS036H; Mini’s is rated at 500 milliwatts, but the latest version is rated by the manufacturer at 1,000 milliwatts.

Antenna: The antenna is a 2.4 gHz, 24-inch, 8.5-decibel vertical antenna  with an N-type female connector at the bottom. 

Your Marine Parts Source Experts Have the Recipe for Your Do-It-Yourself Antenna Fix

Software: Your marine parts source professionals know that you will need to install the driver and interface for the chipset in the new Alfa card. 

Housing: The PVC container assembly comprises a 3-inch diameter pipe that is 6 inches long, with a matching domed cap and a screw-on base.

Accessories: Mini used a 10-inch-long coaxial pigtail (RP-SMA male to N male) to connect the card to the antenna. To connect the Alfa Wi-Fi booster to his computer, he used a 2-foot-long USB male mini-B to male mini-A adapter cable to start the cable run.  

INSTALLATION DETAILS

1. Install the driver and utility to the computer.

2. Using the USB cables, coaxial pigtail and required adapter, assemble the antenna components for testing. 

3. To build the PVC housing, first drill a hole in the domed PVC cap to take the base of the antenna. 

4. Cut a hole in the screw-on base-cap to let the USB cable exit the bottom. This hole should not be in the center of the base-cap, as it might interfere with any threaded center-mounting arrangement.

5. To secure the card inside the PVC pipe, cut a 2-inch-long piece of scrap wood so that it fits snugly inside the pipe, then glue it in place. Mini glued the card to the wood insert, but one could easily use adhesive Velcro tape, which would allow you to more easily remove the WiFi adapter, if needed.

6. Cut a hole in the base to hold a mounting clamp if you intend to mount the antenna on deck.

7. Drill a couple of quarter-inch holes in the cap to make it easy to disassemble using a long screwdriver for leverage. Fill the holes with earplugs to keep water out.

8. Put everything together. The antenna will stick out the top, the USB cable will come out of the bottom, and the antenna mounting clamp will be on the bottom-center—and all will be waterproof.

9. If you want to be able to hang the antenna in the rigging for greater range in some places, you can screw on a small ring-eye.

Visit us at http://www.raritaneng.com/category-pages/replacement-parts/ and see how Raritan Engineering  your marine parts source can help you fill all your marine supply needs.

via Build Your Own Long-range WiFi Antenna 

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Your Marine Parts Depot Professionals Help You Keep Your Reels In Great Shape While Casting 

Raritan Engineering your marine parts depot analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding offshore reel casting tips.

Your marine parts depot experts know that a bird’s nest this snarled requires snipping and respooling. Avoid putting a reel out of commission with these tips to prevent backlashes when casting.

Whether casting a jig or live bait, West Coast anglers are some of the best offshore conventional casters I’ve ever seen. Experienced slingers out of San Diego, Dana Point, Long Beach and other popular ports launch surface iron with a star-drag reel 100-plus yards to blitzing yellowtail. 

Because of the nature of headboat fishing off the SoCal coast, anglers have mastered distance casting to catch tunas, yellowtail, wahoo and dorado. 

Given these advantages to casting conventional gear offshore, I reached out to two West Coast experts for their insight on what to do and what not to do. 

Practice Casting

Casting a jig on a conventional setup is easier with a top shot of mono and a 9- to 10-foot rod. As soon as the lure hits the water, stop the spool to prevent nasty overruns. 

One good way to practice casting is to use an old soft-plastic swimbait on a hook. “It replicates a live bait closely in size and weight,” explains Carson, “much better than a clothespin used by old-timers to practice.”

Mono is More Forgiving

Backlashes often result when ­something affects the timing of a cast. Don’t get distracted by other anglers’ actions. Backlashes with braid are a nightmare compared with a monofilament headache.

Carson utilizes a top shot of 100 yards of mono also. “Whatever distance you regularly cast your iron, there should be enough mono to handle a long cast,” he says. 

When fishing conventional mono with lures, the mono is much more forgiving with tangles and backlashes. Still, mono does have memory and can twist up at times. 

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Carson points out that the shoulder of the spool is actually called the flange. “This is what you want to pressure when casting to prevent burning your thumb,” he explains. Your marine parts depot specialists feel that size 16 lever drags and other larger reels mostly don’t have the flange because it cuts down on a reel’s line capacity.

Backlashes often result when ­something affects the timing of a cast. Don’t get distracted by other anglers’ actions. 

Match Tackle Appropriately

Many California fishermen, especially anglers who fish their gear on multi-day trips, tend not to tweak spool tension. For example, when a lever drag is completely disengaged, they want their spool to spin as freely as the reel is capable.

Instead of tweaking tension settings, fishermen have multiple “sticks” for different classes of fish and fishing techniques. Specific rod-and-reel setups allow anglers to cast surface iron, deep jig, fight fish in the 50-pound-and-under class, and live-bait for larger tuna in the 100-pound class. 

To reach lurking gamefish such as wahoo, lightweight delicate baits, above, must be cast away from the boat. You need to flip your bait out without flipping it off the hook.

The live-bait fishery in SoCal is vitally important; Prieto fishes live bait almost 95 percent of the time. Usually sardines, anchovies or mackerel are baits of choice, depending on yearly and seasonal changes to bait prevalence. 

When casting a live baitfish, as soon as the bait hits the water, immediately put your thumb to the spool to prevent a bird’s nest. 

“Off Guadalupe Island this year, small sardines were the only bait available,” recounts Carson. “So anglers had to use 80-pound braid and a 4- to 5-foot section of 80 fluorocarbon to get a bite from a 100-plus-pound tuna.”

Common Mistakes to Watch Out For

Fishing is often shoulder to shoulder along a rail, so anglers require lightweight conventional gear with high drag pressures to prevent losing fish to friendly-fire tangles.

  • Anglers should “set and forget” their spool tensions, says Capt. Ernie Prieto. 

  • Pay attention to the whole cast. Finish the cast, says Prieto. Keep your thumb lightly on the spool the whole time. “It’s like coaster brakes on a bike,” he says. “Be ready to brake quickly.”

  • Pay attention to how much line is spooled onto the reel. Underfilled reels definitely affect distance, while overfilled are more likely to backlash. 

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information on marine parts and other marine supplies you may need.

via How to Cast Offshore Conventional Reels

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Your TruDesign Experts Know How to Help You Avoid Those First Timer Mistakes

Raritan Engineering Company your TruDesign professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding great advice for all cruisers. 

Advice for first time cruisers from those who’ve been there!

Is one of your plans this year to spend less time being a land-lover and explore cruising long term? Your TruDesign analysts say, please read what these seasoned cruisers had to say about their advice for first timers.

Your marine parts express experts know that a retired associate professor of Physical Therapy from Florida International University in Miami, Willie has been sailing for more than 40 years with her husband, Mark.

“I suppose one thing I could say would be for the neophyte to learn that there is no rush, that they don’t have to be somewhere so badly that they must risk life and vessel to make a deadline.”

Stephen has cruised for more than 30 years. Your seacocks experts know that he is currently in Atlanta, Georgia, between boats, and prepping for a return to The Bahamas.

Your TruDesign Specialists Suggest Not Rushing to Reach Your Destinations

You can find more information as well as get assistance on seacocks at Raritan Engineering.

“If you are sailing as a couple find your own area/s of competence. This will help you to keep the peace on your boat.

Your marine head unit specialists feel that Paola learned to sail in dinghies as an adult before her first trip on a cruiser from Poole to Cherbourg at the age of 35. Not put off by the cold overnight Channel crossing, she then sailed with her husband between the UK and Spain over a period of few months before deciding to give up work and home and move permanently onto their Bavaria 37.

The couple sailed from Cowes to Buenos Aires and back over a period of five years. They are now back in the UK living on land, but still spend holidays sailing to Europe.

“Keep it small and simple”

“Simplicity – Avoid electrics and electronics wherever possible. This will save you money too. Install wind vane self steering – equivalent to an additional crew member and all for free.”

Your marine cylinder heads professionals know that his book, Last Voyages, describes the lives, sailing careers and final voyages of some of the world’s finest sailors who were lost at sea was published in January 2017.

Kieran is the editor of Yachting Monthly. He has been sailing for about 30 years and owns an small, elderly and slightly grubby plastic sloop.

“Consider carefully what you wish for since the reality can be both the fulfillment of a dream and the ultimate nightmare, but if you feel you have the skill, resilience and determination then there is no better way of life – so just do it.”

“Don’t be over reliant on technology, use traditional astro navigational skills as well. A wind vane steering system and a well balanced sail plan will take you around the world for free – power hungry technology can lead you into a state of electro- mechanical stress.”

You’re ready to slip the lines, the engine’s ticking, life jackets are on, and breakables are stowed, but are you really…

Raritan Engineering has great pricing on TruDesign fittings, seacocks and ball valves.

via Advice for first time cruisers from those who’ve been there!

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Your Seacocks Professionals Know the Importance of Good Quality Knots

Raritan Engineering Company your seacocks analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why you should know your knots. 

Your seacocks experts know that I can tie a bowline around my waist with one hand. Either hand, in fact. Which is why I’m drinking Chuck Larson’s beer right now. Chuck bet me the case of Rhinelander shorties he had on the seat of his truck that I could not perform this trick, in one try, with my left hand. 

It was the taut-line hitch that helped me score Chuck’s beer. The sun finally came out while we were trolling in his Yar-Craft for walleye and so it seemed to me an appropriate time to deploy the sun top, but Chuck just muttered, “It’s broke.”

The adjustable nylon straps that secure the aft top bow to the gunwales were missing. Those straps hold the canvas taut (foreshadowing here), and without tautness, the top would just sort of sag over us. 

Eventually I told Chuck about the time I used a sheet bend to turn a water hose into an emergency anchor line, and how I learned to tie the bowline with one hand. The premise was that a Scout who has slipped off a cliff and landed on a precarious ledge could tie the bowline, which makes a loop that will not slip, around his waist and then be pulled to safety by his buddies from above.

However, this is the only way I learned how to tie a bowline: around my waist with one hand. And if I want to tie one today — to make a loop on a line to toss over a piling, for example — I orient the line with the loop toward me and imagine I am making that knot with a broken arm. I’m practicing right now. Without setting down my beer.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/product-category/trudesign/seacocks/ and see how you can always find more information as well as get assistance on seacocks and all your marine needs at Raritan Engineering.

Learn How to Tie Common Boating Knots

Your seacocks specialists know that there is nothing like cruising through the open water on a pleasant, hot day feeling the mist of water lightly spray over you. The pure relaxation and excitement of traveling from port to port or island to island is one of the greatest feelings any avid boater can think of. 

Bowline Knot

The Bowline Knot is another useful type of knot used in situations that require a firm hold that is easy to untie in a moment’s notice. Once this knot is fully tied, it forms a fixed loop at the end of the rope designed to put around a post or cleat for temporary mooring. This knot is strong and secure but should not be used in life or death situations.

  1. Lay the rope across your left hand with the free end hanging down.
  2. Bring the free end up forming an eye hole (commonly called the rabbit hole) and pass it through the eye hole from the underside of the rope. The step is referred to the rabbit coming out of the hole.
  3. Wrap the free end around the standing or fixed part of the line and back down through the eye hole. This step is referred to the rabbit traveling around the tree and back down into the hole.
  4. Tighten the Bowline Knot by pulling on the free end while holding the standing or fixed part of the line.

Clove Hitch

A Clove Hitch is used for a variety of applications but is primarily used to tie to dock posts for temporary mooring. This knot is very easy to tie and untie making it an excellent binding knot. The Clove Hitch should be used with caution because it can slip if there isn’t constant pressure on the line or if the object it is attached to rotates.

  1. Wrap the free end of the line around the rope around the post or object.
  2. Cross the line over itself and wrap the free end around the post again.
  3. Slip the free end under the last wrap.
  4. Pull the knot tight by pulling the free and standing end of the line.

Now explore open waters and feel safe knowing that your boat and other essentials will be tied securely to your boat. If you need any mooring accessories for your floating boat lift or dock shop at JetDock today!

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on seacocks and all of your marine supply needs. 

via Off My Dock: The Beer-Case Bowline

via Learn How to Tie 5 Common Boating Knots

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Frank Lanier

Your Marine Products Professionals Help You to Withstand the Big Storm Surge

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week some amazing suggestions regarding tropical storm preparedness tips for you and your friends. 

Your marine products experts know that if your marina has floating docks, the pilings should be high enough to withstand the storm surge. Most marinas built after 1992, when Hurricane Andrew wreaked havoc with floating docks in South Florida, now have 18-foot tall pilings.

The two most extensive articles appeared in July 2008 “Gear for Battening Down Ahead of Storms,” and “Tropical Storms Dos and Don’ts,” from November 2011.  

Our first choice in a storm is a haulout facility, preferable well-inland and out of the path of the storm. The facility shouldn’t be vulnerable to storm surge, and it should be equipped with fixed anchors to tie your boat down. Second choice would be a hurricane hole with good holding, again well inland and out of the storm’s path. 

Neither of these boats are tied for a storm, but they demonstrate key points regarding positioning and length of a spring line. The longer the spring line (or any dock line), the more elasticity you will have in the event of a storm surge.

Your Marine Products Analysts Suggest Not to Leave Yourself Vulnerable to Storms

• Dock line size varies both with boat size and expected wind speed. Your marine products specialists feel that boats docked in hurricane or other severe weather areas should consider going up a size from common recommendations. However, be sure your deck cleats can stand up to the loads (see point below). 

• Loads on the cleat of a 35- to 40-foot boat during an actual hurricane can exceed one ton. While boat building standards (the American Boat and Yacht Council in the U.S.) specify load-carrying ability, some older dock cleats are not up to snuff. 

• If your boat is 30-feet or longer and you do not yet have mid-ships cleats for attaching spring lines, consider adding them at the next opportunity. These should be sized and backed in the same manner as bow cleats, since loads are the same or greater. 

• Removing canvas and sails reduces windage. Specifically, remove the furling jib, one of the most common storm casualties. Dodgers and other canvas will also suffer if left up during the storm.

• Don’t leave anything on deck. Even dense objects can be blown across the deck and do damage, or be lost overboard.

• Use plenty of fenders. Fenders need to protect you from the dock and neighboring boats. A fender board can be particularly useful in some scenarios.  

• Floating versus fixed docks. Properly designed floating docks are generally considered a safer option than fixed docks, with some important caveats. The support pilings must be high enough for the predicted storm surge. 

• Lastly, any marina facing significant storm surge is simply not safe, but those protected from a long fetch by a low wave barrier are particularly vulnerable.  

Learn more from Raritan Engineering Company this month about all of your marine products supply needs. 

via Preparing a Marina-bound Boat for a Tropical Storm

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Your Marine Sanitation Analysts Say Consistency Should Never Be Overlooked 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the giant key to giant gains in the race.

Your marine sanitation professionals know that I’ve said it many times, it’s something you hear a lot around there: Key West Race Week is a long regatta. Five days and 12 races.  

First is starting. Your marine parts depot experts know that you are never going to have a good regatta in a tough fleet unless you can consistently get off the line well. So you need come into the event with some basic skills, but then you need to work on starting each day to gradually improve both boathandling and time and distance.  

Second is boatspeed. This is very important here. There is often a relatively steady wind, and more waves than wind, so you don’t want to tack too much. You have to get faster if you expect to get on the podium.

Thirdly, boathandling. This is actually the easiest area to make small gains each day. If you talk about each maneuver with your whole crew after the race, there are always ways to do it a little better. 

Get Prepared Early

If you’re waiting until the weather leg to get things hooked up, you’re too late.

If you have more than one spinnaker, get your tactician/speed doctor to choose a sail before the start. Your GTA 5 submarine parts specialists know that if you’re using a spinnaker pole, it can be hooked to the mast at the base or to a shroud with the afterguy. Have the topping lift and forgery already in place so it’s only a matter of popping the pole into place on the mast and hoisting the topping lift.

Your Marine Sanitation Experts Know That Patience Will Be Your Best Friend Out on the Water

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine holding tanks at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine holding tanks analysts know you should take your time, and stay on the rail.

Just as “ready about” prior to a tack is not a signal for a mass exodus from the weather rail, getting ready for a spinnaker set only needs minimal movement. 

On symmetrical boats, the only required movement is the bow person moving to get the pole up and the spinnaker pulled to meet the outboard end of the pole. The topping lift can be tailed by the pit person from the weather rail, as can the slack in the afterguy. 

The spinnaker sheet itself is the last thing you need to worry about. It doesn’t need to be touched until the sail is 75 percent of the way up.

The Perfect Turn

The goal is to turn smoothly from close hauled to broad reach. Turn too fast and you’ll end up too deep (with the wind too far aft). The spinnaker will blanket behind the mainsail, twist, and collapse. Turn too slowly and you won’t get down far enough.

Freeze!

Your marine parts source professionals know that movement kills speed. As soon as the sail fills, get in appropriate spots for the conditions: forward and leeward in light air; aft and to weather in more breeze. Then freeze!

Your boat cleaning products analysts feel that spinnaker sets don’t have to be a point of stress or downfall. Prepare, plan, stay relaxed, and let the magic happen! If you’d like to read the other articles in the series on make or break moves, check our our pieces on tacking and jibing.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine sanitation, marine holding tanks, and boat cleaning products.

via McKee’s Key West Minute: Small Steps, Big Gains

via THE KEY TO BETTER SPINNAKER SETS

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Your Boat Cleaning Products Professionals Explain That Preparation Is the First Step to Surviving  

Raritan Engineering Company your boat cleaning products experts are excited to share with you this week crucial information needed when preparing for earthquakes and tsunamis.

The first step to survival is preparation, and we hope sharing the Neal’s insights and firsthand experience will help others cruising tsunami-prone waters to be better prepared in the event of an earthquake.

From Mahina Expeditions:

As sailors, we need to be aware of the ever present threat of a tsunami. By establishing emergency procedures for your crew and vessel along with knowing what to expect and what to do in the event of a tsunami, it will be far less likely that you or your crew will become casualties or that your vessel will sustain damage. 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Tsunami Warning Center is located at Ewa Beach, Hawaii. They have seafloor and coastal sensors located around the Pacific. 

When Ashore in a Coastal Location

In any coastal location, always note the tidal range and times. If you ever see the sea level receding lower than normal, realize that this is the natural warning sign of an approaching tsunami. 

Your Boat Cleaning Analysts Suggest to Exercise Caution If You See the Sea Level Receding

Your boat cleaning products specialists know that in the Samoan tsunami, the ground floors of many buildings were washed clean of everything, and it would not have been possible to survive due to backwash of debris and swift currents, while above the third floor, many buildings were relatively undamaged.

At Anchor

If you are at anchor and experience an earthquake or rapidly receding water, immediately start your engine, raise your anchor and get to deeper water. In the 2009 tsunami that hit Niuatoputapu, friends aboard a 39-foot sloop tried to raise anchor immediately after the earthquake but found their chain wrapped around a coral head, so they let out all of their chain. 

When leaving the boat

Here are some priorities to quickly grab:

1. Passports, cash and credit cards

2. Iridium satellite phone

3. Cell phone

4. VHF handheld radio (this proved very helpful in Samoa)

5. Flashlights

Know the Signs

Wayne Hodges and the group of boaters in Pago Pago Harbor never received an “official” warning of the impending tsunami. But nature provided clues. Knowing how to read the signs, and acting on them, can be the difference between life and death.

The first clue of a tsunami threat was the earthquake. Your other option is to take the boat out to deep water. This is risky, however, especially if you do not know how close the quake’s epicenter is. The closer the epicenter, the less amount of time you have before a tsunami arrives. 

Another clue of nature is receding water, which often precedes the arrival of a tsunami. In the devastating 2004 Sumatra quake and tsunamis, many people saw the waters recede but did not know what it meant. 

Earthquakes and tsunamis release unbelievable amounts of energy. Some additional natural signs that a tsunami may be imminent are odd sounds, weird vibrations and unusual water behavior. Hodges heard a thrumming. 

Unlike hurricanes and volcanic eruptions, which can generally be predicted early on, no one knows when the next tsunami will come. But come it will. 

Click here for more information from Raritan Engineering on boat cleaning products and your other marine supplies needs.

via Earthquake and Tsunami Awareness and Response

via HOW TO PREPARE FOR A TSUNAMI

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Your Marine Holding Tanks Experts Want to Prevent More Sailing Accidents 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine holding tanks specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to avoid those nasty sailing collisions.

In May 2012, CAMPER helmsman Roberto ‘Chuny’ Bermudez found himself nearly face to face with a whale in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean. 

Your marine holding tanks professionals know that another video dated May 2016 from the Canadian Ocean Racing team highlights what happens when a sailing vessel collides at night. “We were doing 15-20 knots and there was this loud smack,” says a crew member into the camera. 

“Overall, we think that the planning needs to be more proactive,” says Fabian Ritter, Ship Strike Data Coordinator with the International Whaling Commission (IWC), the global intergovernmental body charged with conservation of whales and the management of whaling. 

Damian Foxall, veteran ocean racer and Recreation Education Manager at the Canadian Wildlife Federation, is confident that this number is only the tip of the iceberg.

“There’s a problem right now in that the vast majority of sailors do not even know that there is a duty to report these incidents,” says Foxall. 

One race Foxall brings up as a perfect example is the 2016 IMOCA Ocean Masters Transat from New York, NY to Les Sables d’Olonne, France. Your marine holding tanks analysts says fourteen single handed IMOCA 60 monohulls departed New York, bound for Les Sables-d’Olonne on May 29th. 

Go to http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/waste-treatment/managerm/ and see how you can find more information on marine holding tanks at Raritan Engineering.

“We are very saddened that this could happen when we worked to protect marine life which would possibly cross the course of our race. The sailing community is very concerned about protecting nature, especially within the seas, which is our playing field. In our commitment to trying to resolve this issue we will assist other race organizers to find ways to work together with scientists around World Sailing’s Major Oceanic Events commission to improve safety of all races, both current and in the future.”

For Foxall, who studied this race in depth, this is a troubling story.

Both Foxall and Ritter urge race organizers to apply care towards the timing and route planning of offshore events and to inform sailors of where they are most likely to encounter whales, dolphins, and other vulnerable marine life. 

If an accident between a sailing vessel and a whale takes place, both Foxall and Ritter urge sailors to take the time to report the incident, not only as a notice to mariners in the area, but also to the International Whaling Commission’s global database on ship strikes located at https://iwc.int/ship-strikes.

Take Action

  • As a sailor, get to know the waters you’ll be sailing through. As a regatta organizer, take care to avoid sensitive areas and to integrate key marine wildlife information into your event.
  • Report any and all collisions with whales to the International Whaling Commission with as many details as possible. These reports are confidential and are used to better understand migratory whale behavior. https://portal.iwc.int/login
  • Working with information from the International Whaling Commission, Sailors for the Sea and the Canadian Wildlife Federation added a new best practice to the Clean Regattas program that helps race organizers protect Wildlife and Habitat. 

Click here to find more information on marine holding tanks and other marine supplies at Raritan Engineering.

via When Whales and Sails Collide

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Your Macerating Pump Specialists Give You the Big Edge in Big Boat Racing 

Raritan Engineering Company your macerating pump analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding big strategies for big boats.

Your macerating pump experts know that my first superyacht race was in France in 2008 on a 112-foot Swan, and the first tactical call of the week was whether to race with the spare anchor, 300 feet of chain, and the Jet Ski, which we discovered in the bow locker. Lighter boats are faster boats, of course, but we quickly learned that when the boat weighs north of 200,000 pounds, it’s best to focus on sailing safely and not upsetting the captain by making him leave the toys on the dock.

Your marine parts plus professionals know that very few superyachts are built with racing performance as a top priority. The key to racing them successfully, therefore, is to understand the limitations we have to work with. That’s the fun of it, too, because there are always plenty of hands on deck. 

Once we heeled enough to get the leeward rail wet, which was around 14 knots of breeze, we could sail well to our handicap. In 15 knots and flat water, we could finish a tack in about one minute and 20 seconds. Your marine parts online analysts feel that the tacking angle was around 110 degrees, which isn’t too bad for a 320-ton ship. Light air was a different story. In less than 10 knots, the tacking angle was more like 130.

When the wind was up, we had one shot at sheeting the genoa on after a tack. If we tried to sheet harder, once the genoa was fully pressed, the computer would tell the captive winch to ease instead of trim because the loads were too high.

The start of a superyacht race is simple but rarely easy. Organizers wisely set up the races in either a pursuit format, where the boats start in order of handicap performance (slowest to fastest), or on a staggered-start format (typically two-minute gaps), with a handicap applied after the finish.

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Your Macerating Pump Professionals Help You Avoid the Kiss of Death

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine hardware at Raritan Engineering.

Well, that was the kiss of death. Your marine hardware specialists say that they started on starboard but were about 30 seconds late. Pretty good timing for the 500-plus-ton Perini Navi, but it presented a significant problem for us, as we were committed to our timing two minutes out. 

While doing so, we had to honor a mandatory 40-meter safety gap and still head up around the other boat’s transom to clear the starboard end of the line. The only way to slow our beast was to ease everything and bear away to a near flat run. By the time we got cooking again toward the starting line, we were more than 45 seconds late for our start and had completely screwed up the boat behind us.

Your marine parts near me experts say that in reality, tacticians and drivers get puckered when the boats get less than a boat length from each other, because it takes a shockingly long time to execute course changes. The last thing an owner wants is to be on SportsCenter’s highlights reel. 

Tactically, the play is for the faster boat to sail directly at the transom of the slower boat and put a man on the bow with a digital range finder and a communications unit, relaying distance to the afterguard in the cockpit. 

It’s essential to decide well ahead of the intersection how to approach each boat. It’s also beneficial to know which ones are happy to let you through quickly (perhaps they are scored in a separate class) and which ones won’t roll over without a fight. For a slower boat, the tactical game is based on sailing smart and minimizing the effect of the bigger boats as they stream past. 

Just as Mirabella V rolled us, 50 meters to windward, the captain of our boat remarked that Mirabella V had the tallest mast in the world. 

Nearly all the top racing superyachts have a playbook of maneuvers, which are ­updated each regatta so everyone on the crew knows where to be positioned for hoists, sets and drops. On Marie we had a five-­minute countdown to the kite drop that we rarely deviated from. 

Pulling 1,600 square meters of spinnaker cloth from the water, with 40 of your friends on board, is not a winning move.

Raritan Engineering has more information on macerating pumps, marine hardware, and marine water heaters.

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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Specialists Help You Take Good Care of Your Outboards

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding outboard motor painting tips.

Today, your marine hot water heaters experts know that many outboard motors are available in colors to complement the shade of your boat. Honda, Mercury and Suzuki, for example, all offer their outboards in at least two colors; Evinrude lets you add custom side plates and accents from a wide spectrum of color choices.

There are also companies that paint motors. The Miami-based Outboard Paint Shop, for instance, will paint an outboard in the 250 to 400 hp range for $1,200.

Yet there is a more economical, DIY option. The proprietary Quantum paint system from Engineered Marine Coatings (EMC2) utilizes a hybrid acrylic- polyester topcoat — a technology developed for the aerospace industry — to create an extremely durable and professional-looking finish.

Disassemble and Wash

Remove the cowl, the shroud from the midsection, and any plastic pieces or appliques that might interfere with the painting process. Remove the rubber seal around the bottom of the cowl and any other rubber grommets or gaskets that might interfere with painting exterior surfaces. 

2. Prep and Mask

Sand all surfaces to be painted with 350- to 400-grit sandpaper. Use a power sander on broad surfaces, but you might need to hand-sand hard-to-reach spots such as around the bracket and lower unit. 

3. Paint the Parts

Choose a windless day with low humidity and temperatures around 72 degrees. Protect the uncured finish from evening dew by starting early in the day or working in a covered area. Spray the dry surfaces with a medium coat of the Quantum 45-X-115 K adhesion promoter and let dry for five minutes. 

4. Reassemble and Debug

Allow the final coat to dry for 24 hours. Then remove all masking materials. Carefully reattach and reassemble all parts. If a bug or debris marred the finish while painting, wet-sand the spot with 1,500- to 2,000-grit wet sandpaper until the blemish is eliminated and the desired smoothness is achieved. 

How Many Cans?

Each Quantum 2K kit can be custom packed based on your motor size. It includes Quantum SR-002 Surface Prep/Clean, Quantum Adhesion Promoter, Quantum 2KA spray cans, rags, gloves, Scotch pad, tape and draping. 

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Professionals Equip You With the Skills You Need

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice makers at Raritan Engineering.

Painting Outboard Parts

First off, your marine ice makers know that it is best that you do not plan any outings for at least 2 weeks when undertaking this task. Initially, it will take some time, especially if you are going to try to repaint parts on the powerhead. 

Keep in mind – Aerosol paint jobs are no where near as durable as a paint job done with quality paint from a gravity fed spray gun.

With Aerosol Can Paint

Here are the steps.

Items you need:

  1. Quality primer (self etching), paint, and clear coat.
  2. clear workspace
  3. wet sandpaper – 400, 800, 1000 – 2000 (available at automotive shops)
  4. Quality Rubbing / Polishing compound (3M Perfect-it II) removes fines scratches
  5. Plenty of time and patience.

Try to use a sanding block on flat surfaces and keep the pressure even. For other areas, you can obtain paint remover from local shops but it takes time to remove. It works great for those recessed areas, but it is messy and toxic.

Raritan Engineering Company has more information on marine hot water heaters, marine ice makers, and any marine sanitation device.

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