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RPA – REVERSE POLARITY ALARM

We Know What You Need

Essential aid for traveling boaters when connecting to unfamiliar dock side power. The quality of marina wiring can vary greatly from place to place and from plug to plug.

That is why most boats designed to plug in to shore power have a polarity indicator. It is an important safety feature that few boat owners fully understand or appreciate.

With a couple of exceptions, it should be standard equipment on every boat that is capable of plugging into a common 120 volt AC shore power outlet.

At Raritan, we offer dependability where it counts.

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Be Sure to Get Your Reverse Polarity Alarms at Raritan Engineering

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Your TruDesign Specialists Discusses the Great Potential in Handicapped Racing

Raritan Engineering your TruDesign analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how disabilities don’t stop sailing lovers.

Your TruDesign experts know that the greatest area of growth potential in the sport is handicap racing. Unlike one design classes, which are limited to only the boats made of each type, handicap racing can include all keel boat types. Better yet, since boats became made of fiberglass, they seemingly last forever.

So if there is an interest to get boats on the race course, the mission then is to have events that encourage participation. Your marine parts for sale professionals feel that people need to feel like the racing is fair, and the level of competition meets their level of investment. And of course, it should be fun too.

One of the battles that handicap events face is how to fairly group boats for competition. While certain events may attract the hardcore teams that have made a high investment, all events need to address how to create fleet splits to group boats that can fairly race together.

This issue has gotten increasingly difficult with lighter sport boats mixing with cruiser displacement boats. Your marine parts Canada analysts heard that in a recent Scuttlebutt survey, 74% of the respondents indicated that you must separate these two boat divisions to provide fair racing.

Here were a few comments:

“Sport boats are simply far too different from displacement boats to be in the same fleet. They need their own rating band.”

“I would think that the sport boat sailors would generally be a keener racing crew and would rather race more of the same competition.”

Sailing allows participants to enjoy the freedom of movement and independence – whether it’s a lazy afternoon on an inland lake, mastering the wind in recreational races, or challenging yourself with elite-level competition, sailing offers something for everyone.

Sue Beatty is the Executive Director of Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating (CRAB) in Annapolis, Md., a DSUSA Chapter. “We recommend starting with a short classroom session, especially for those who are completely new to sailing,” she said. “We cover a basic set of terms for parts of the boat such as main, jib, rudder, keel, etc. 

“Paraplegics are routinely able to sail the boats once they’ve been assisted aboard,” said Beatty. “Our staff and volunteers assist guests on and off of the boat. That’s where those open and broad decks come in handy. Additionally we use floating docks and tie the boats up very tight when boarding or disembarking so the height of the boat’s sides don’t vary and the boat doesn’t move very much.”

Your TruDesign Professionals Know That Adaptability Is the Key to Not Giving Up

We are proud to be your TruDesign supplier. You can find out more information as well as get assistance on all of your marine supply needs at Raritan Engineering. Your TruDesign specialists know that the boats have two fiberglass seats. Each seat is a single moulded seat and back with two seat belts to safely secure sailors in them. Each seat is mounted on an aluminum bar that allows it to pivot from one side of the boat to the other if desired. Normally they are locked in on one side or the other. There is a small footrest on the support bar as well. Someone who is strapped into one of these seats is both comfortable and very secure.

“Adaptations for disabilities include things like special seating, electric power winches, electric starter motors, talking GPS, roller furling, davit transfer systems (similar to Hoyer), joy stick controls and other innovations sometimes specific to a certain situation,” Ewing said. 

“Others decide that they want to learn everything about sailing and pursue that. The best example is a high quad in Chicago who races in the Chicago to Mackinac race on Lake Michigan, sits in a special seat in the stern of his boat and calls the tactics, sail set and all the decisions for racing his boat. You need the mind, the knowledge and the ability to communicate to be a skipper,” he said.

Competitive & Paralympic Sailing

Paralympic Level Sailing

There are three medal events at the Games. Your marine parts corp experts understand that these are the 2.4mR, SKUD 18 and Sonar classes, featuring one, two and three sailors per boat respectively. Each event consists of a series of up to 11 races – weather permitting.  

“For example, the week before a world championship, we would do training on site at the World Championship site and focus on fine-tuning starting strategies and set up. Whereas six months prior, we would do a camp working on speed, speed set up through sail trim, sail shape and sail trim,” she said. 

Paralympic Classification

The Paralympic sailing classification system is based on three factors – stability, hand function, and mobility. Vision impairments have a separate classification procedure. 

Athletes with vision impairment are placed into one of three competition rating classes, based on their visual acuity and field of vision.

Depending on their visual ability, they compete in sport class 3, 5 or 7, with 7 indicating the highest eligible visual ability.

“We have a lot of quads driving boats, so there is quite a range of disabilities,” Alison said. “In contrast to many of the sports, the amputees don’t just play with the amputees, the blind don’t just play with the blind, the quads don’t play with the quads.”

Equipment and Expenses

“Sailing is not the most inexpensive sport once you own equipment and take into consideration travel and training. However, on a national team, although we don’t have monthly stipends, sailors do get some grant funding and we provide a lot in terms of resources and support for logistics, coaching, shipping and transportation. 

Don’t forget to order your marine parts here at Raritan Engineering. We always have more information on TruDesign, seacocks and on marine toilet systems.

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Your Seacocks Professionals Help You Use Your Sailing Skills in Everyday Life Situations 

Raritan Engineering Company your seacocks analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how sailors are just good at everyday things.

Your seacocks experts understand that you’re winning at this life thing. You’re well-traveled. You have strong opinions on the meat industry and an arsenal of impressive life hacks you picked up while backpacking in Burma. 

But there’s always someone out there that’s cooler than you. Like sailors. You’ll never be as cool as a sailor. Here are nine everyday things they’d crush you at without even trying.

1. Parallel parking
I know, I know. You’re great at parallel parking. You should be the president of it. The words three-point turn don’t even exist in your vocabulary. But you’re an amateur. 

2. Walking straight when drunk
Your poker face is a farce. We all know how many tequilas you’ve had as soon as you see-saw to the bathroom like a sausage in a pinball machine. Legs don’t lie, unless you’re a sailor. 

3. Straightfacing a double entendre
Sailing terminology is (wait for it) an ocean teeming with metaphors, puns, double entendres and that’s-what-she-saids. You can’t think of a boating pun that hasn’t been exhausted. Chuckling at words and phrases like ‘breastlines; cockpit; coming about; and, in need of a tug’ is the sole folly of us landlubbers. 

Visit us at Raritan Engineering Company to find seacocks for all your sanitation needs.

4. Giving directions
‘Ja, so like take a right by the tree and then pass the school. I think it’s a school. Maybe it’s prison. A few blocks behind that is a road. I can’t remember the name of it but just call me when you’re outside.’ These are not directions. 

5. Dressing appropriately
Weather app, shmeather app. Even the best ones resort to some measure of horoscopic hocus pocus and the problem is nobody has built one out of actual human bones. Sailors have bones. They have bones that tingle, crack, wobble and creak. 

6. BDSM
Don’t fib. The reason you’ve never been open to the idea of bondage isn’t because it’s taboo. It’s because you’re rubbish with ropes. Tying your beau to a bedpost isn’t the same as tying a shoelace. There are safety issues. 

7. Pulling an all-nighter
It was the pillar of your tertiary education, but somewhere along the line the insouciance of burning the midnight oil turned to chronic anxiety. 

Caffeine is impotent, hardcore drum and bass is discombobulating and even The Panic Monster can’t keep you awake anymore. But sailors are fueled by something stronger than caffeine and panic combined: fear of the unknown. 

8. Letting things go
When something falls in the ocean it’s gone forever (unless you’re James Cameron). The only thing to do is forget about it and move on while muttering something profound like ‘It belongs to the ocean now, man.’ 

Choose your marine supplies here at Raritan Engineering. We always have more information on seacocks and any of your marine supply needs.

via Nine Everyday Things a Sailor is better at

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Your Marine Toilet Systems Analysts Take Time to Answer Your Life Jacket Questions 

Raritan Engineering is excited to share with you this week these pointers on what to keep in mind when deciding to buy your next life jackets. 

Your marine toilet systems specialists know that as a follow-up to last week’s blog post on safety tethers, it is important to note that these devices are just one component in a system that includes the jackline and a safety harness (typically combined with a personal flotation device, or PFD) and that these components should be evaluated together as a whole. 

One of the chief questions about an inflatable PFD-harness is whether you want an auto-inflating PFD or a manually inflating model. (Some sailors prefer just a harness without any integral flotation, also an option.) The auto-inflating devices are activated by water or pressure change; manual-inflating devices require the wearer to pull a lanyard. 

An inflated PFD can also interfere with releasing from the tether. Ordinarily, you would not want to release yourself from your tether, but there are cases in which it is better to cast yourself free from the boat, or you risk drowning. Several crew who survived the capsize of Wing Nuts in this month’s Chicago-to-Mackinac race were forced to detach themselves. One, Stan Dent, had to cut himself free. 

Your Marine Toilet Systems Experts Understand the Need to Get All the Facts Before Buying Life Jackets For Your Family

Your marine toilet systems professionals feel that typically, the tether attaches to the harness/PFD with a snap shackle that is released by pulling a small lanyard. As we’ve found in past testing, trying to locate a small tether and apply 30 pounds of pull while you are being dragged by a boat is no easy task.

Bottom line: If you use an inflatable PFD/harness, test your ability to release yourself with the PFD inflated and uninflated. As I mentioned last week, a quick and easy check of the release mechanism in your tether is to apply as much body weight as possibly on the tether and try to release yourself.

The BoatUS Foundation set out to debunk some of the myths:

1. Inflatable life jackets are zero maintenance – Let’s face it, pretty much nothing on a boat is zero maintenance. Before you head out for the day, simply check to ensure the CO2 cylinder is screwed firmly in and you can see the green indicator tab.  

2. One size fits all – While most inflatables are sized as “universal adult,” all have adjustable cinch straps that will provide a good fit for nearly every size of grown-up on the boat.  

3. Not a lot of choices – Actually, there are. Once you get past a range of colorful designs, there are two basic styles of inflatable life jackets: over-the shoulder suspender-style and waist-fitting belt pack. 

4. Inflatable life jackets are too expensive – Inflatable life jackets start at under $100. That is a real expense for some, but consider that a cheap life jacket that no one will want to wear is as useless as a hook without the worm. 

5. Inflatable life jackets are uncomfortable – Baloney! Inflatable life jackets are compact, don’t trap body heat, give full body movement, and can be as unobtrusive as small bait pouch attached to your belt. 

Visit us at www.raritaneng.com/ and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information regarding marine toilet systems and all of your marine supply needs.

via Manual vs. Automatic Inflatable Life Jacket / Safety Harnesses

via Five Inflatable Life Jacket Myths: Do You Know the Truth?

Frank Lanier

Your Boat Toilets Professionals Know that Having the Right Ladder Could Make All the Difference 

Raritan Engineering Company your boat toilets experts would like to share with you this week these amazing tips on how to choose the best boarding ladder for you.

Last year, we read a review of a Union 36, and the opening photo of the boat featured a unique folding ladder that I hadn’t seen before. The ladder, instead of hanging vertically, folded out at a comfortable angle in a way that seemed—at least in the photo—pretty practical for routine boarding. I was curious how it worked in bouncy weather, and the owner of the boat, PS contributor Frank Lanier, assured me that the ladder, which came with the boat, was as good as any other he’d tried. 

The boat I cruised on for many years, Tosca, was a double-ender with the same sort boarding of complications as the Union 36. A stern boarding ladder didn’t work. 

Shocked at the prices for a stainless-steel ladder and wanting a permanent means of climbing aboard that a person in the water could use without assistance, we settled on a modification that you see on many catboats—folding steps drilled into the rudder (look for our Marshall 22 catboat review in November). 

Boat Boarding ladders can be for day to day boarding and also for emergency situations. There are two times you will need to get back onto your boat from the water. First when you are swimming i.e. intentionally going into the water, and secondly when you fall overboard. 

Had we a boarding ladder or a plan, getting the MOB back aboard would have been much easier.

Your Boat Toilets Analysts Encourage Using Great Ladders to Prevent Drownings

Your boat toilets specialists feel that the RNLI says that people falling overboard (MOB or COB) is on the rise, with numbers almost doubling in the last year. In the US 2/3 of boating deaths are from drowning and 90% were not wearing a PFD.

Types of Boarding Ladder

  • Amidships ladders (self rescue)

  • Transom Boarding

  • Dinghy Boarding

Amidships ladders (self rescue)

Rescuing and boarding amidships is one of the safest places to board your boat or any boat. Transom boarding is fine in flat water but in seas the pitching is quite violent.

Warning; One problem with many amidships ladders is that they are too close to the hull. The reason this is a problem is twofold. first getting your foot onto a rung is hard of its next to the hull.  

Save A Soul Emergency Ladder

This rope style ladder is fixed amidships and a line is left to hang close to the waterline.

A MOB can pull the line to break the Velcro and 9ft of ladder falls out.

The typical amidships ladder works. As with the top three options it will only work for a fully functioning person. If a MOB is tired and wearing a lot of gear climbing this type of ladder will be hard. To help the MOB get a line around them so you can take some of the weight.

Click here and visit Raritan Engineering for more information and assistance regarding boat toilets and any of your marine supply needs.

via In Search of the Perfect Portable Boarding Ladder

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Your Marine Heads Experts Have All the Best Searching Strategies

Raritan Engineering Company your marine heads professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding great sonar tips while shipwreck hunting.

It was 1995, and a good friend from St. Thomas decided he’d been through one too many hurricanes. Your marine heads analysts know that his idea was to move below where the big storms blow, which is south of the 12-degree line of latitude. 

During his multi-month cruise aboard his Fales 32 Navigator motorsailor, he didn’t tow an inflatable dinghy, even though everyone else does. Instead, he towed something much more valuable — a proton magnetometer. Your marine parts USA specialists understand that the towed “fish” of a proton mag is designed to detect ferrous metals — iron — and one day while cruising near an island, he got a hit — a big one. The next thing I knew, I was on a plane down-island to see what the commotion was all about.

Your marine parts Houston professionals feel that the problem was that my friend lost the GPS coordinates from his brick-size Magellan, and the only other tools we had were a blurry photo of the shoreline and some tequila-soaked memories. That’s when I decided to contact Lowrance and enlist the power of its HDS-9 Gen3 multifunction display with StructureScan sonar.

Once we were on location with our C-Map chart chip installed, we began “mowing the lawn” in a series of east-west passes, all the while using the sonar log to record our depth and position simultaneously. When we returned home, we uploaded the data to create the structure map (pictured), which really shows color-depth contours as opposed to bottom structure.

It is a simple matter to do a quick “one-touch” on the screen to mark a waypoint. Your marine parts and supplies analysts know that was critical because we had to return to each spot immediately for underwater investigation, since we only had one day to dive.

We dived on two waypoints without success, but the third one was the charm. We did indeed find an isolated coral head only to discover that the anchor and ring were gone and the bottom was now covered in an invasive species of sea grass.

Your Marine Heads Specialists Help Increase Your Chances for a Successful Find

You can find more information as well as get assistance on an marine toilet of choice and other marine supply needs at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine toilet experts know that upon further topside review, we discovered that the shoreline photo was of the wrong spot, and thanks to Google Earth and multiple conference calls, we realized the actual location of the anchor is several miles north of where we were on this mission. So we will return to the island again in search of the treasure, and C-Map and the Lowrance HDS Gen3 will be right there with us for the ride.

Dreams never die easily, and a long decade later I was finally able to follow up on that early idea. When I did, however, it wasn’t the warm, clear sea of childhood memory I dived into. Instead, it was the cold, dark and murky water of New York City. 

I didn’t just want to explore, I wanted to learn more about the thousands of ships that disappeared without a trace, to learn their secrets and do my part in bringing the sometimes valiant, sometimes horrifying and always human stories to the world of the dry and living. 

Searching can be absolutely maddening. You know the wreck is there. It’s nearby. You can feel it in your bones. The historical record tells you it’s there. Your instinct is to just go to a spot and look, and then go to the next spot where you think it is and look there. Nothing. Try again over here. 

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine heads and all marine sanitation parts.

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Slovenia's Greenline Hybrid Yachts have a super-displacement hull, which enables the yachts to use less fuel, generate lower carbon dioxide emissions and produce less wake. Several Greenline boats will be on display at Yachts Miami Beach.

Your Marine Toilet Specialists Say That Electric Boats Can Be Enjoyable for Everyone

Raritan Engineering Company your marine toilet professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the benefits of switching to an electric boat.

Electric Boating

Your marine toilet analysts know that electric boats are environmentally friendly, almost maintenance free, reliable, cheap to run and easy to operate. With an electric boat you can entertain your family, friends and business associates with a leisurely cruise on the harbour, lake or river.

Quiet

Electric boats give you the opportunity to calmly enjoy the natural surroundings, listen to the water lapping against the hull, birds flying past or just calmly watch the scenery go past without any annoying motor noise.

Low running costs

Electric boats are extremely cheap to run. With today’s soaring fuel prices it can be daunting to fill up your motor boat for a day out on the water. An electric boat can be fully recharged for less than a dollar, realizing huge savings on everyday running costs. 

Safe

Electric boats are very safe. Because there is no engine noise, the skipper can hear approaching boats and steer clear of danger. Apart from a conventional set-up, electric boats can be steered with their motor (a pod engine) or with a propeller attached to the rudder (Duffy electric boats), which makes them extremely maneuverable. 

Luxurious

Most boats in our product range, such as the Duffy electric boats, are standard fitted with many luxuries such as wrap around seating, table, esky, courtesy lights, cushions and plush marine carpet. Optional built-in entertainment features include a radio/CD player, refrigerator, microwave, teak dash, and electric heating. 
 
Go to http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/choosing-your-marine-toilet/ and you will find more information as well as assistance on marine toilets and your other marine supply needs at Raritan Engineering.

Performance

Your marine toilet experts know that some people think that electric boats are slow and have a limited cruising range. While this might have been the case with earlier generations of electric boats, our electric boats have the same or better performance levels as comparable vessels with a combustion engine. 

Slovenia’s Greenline Hybrid Yachts have a super-displacement hull, which enables the yachts to use less fuel, generate lower carbon dioxide emissions and produce less wake. Several Greenline boats will be on display at Yachts Miami Beach.

For the first time, the show is featuring an Electric Boat Pavilion to showcase the marine industry’s advances in environmentally friendly motorboats.

“It’s always our goal to be on the forefront of promoting what’s most current and relevant to boaters,” Show Management vice president of consumer marketing Brett Keating said in a statement.

Show Management, which produces the show, and Trade Only Today are both part of Active Interest Media.

“We look forward to expanding our Electric Boat Pavilion in the future as more companies develop electric boats for the American marketplace,” Keating said.

The show will feature products from Canadian Electric Boats, Rand Boats, Foldable RIB, Greenline Hybrid Yachts, Torqeedo Electric Motors and GoCycle Electric Bikes.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information on any marine toilet and other marine supply needs.

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Our Marine Toilets Dept Discusses: Fishing Safely Near Breakers, Boating Tips

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Your marine toilets experts here at Raritan Engineering know that saltwater game fish often hunt where the ocean surge meets the shore.

The surging turbulence where ocean waves careen into the shallows creates rich hunting areas for game fish such as calico bass, redfish, roosterfish, striped bass and tarpon. Your marine toilets specialists say that despite the dangers, boating anglers have found methods to get close and pull fish from under the menacing waves and foam. I talked to a few veteran anglers to glean six principles for fishing successfully and safely near the pounding surf.

If in Doubt, Stay Out

Stay away from the breaking waves when conditions are too gnarly. “If the swells are big, I steer clear of shore rocks,” says Capt. Benny Florentino, a guide and tournament angler who regularly braves Pacific swells in pursuit of calico bass ranging up to 9 pounds in the rocky shallows off Southern California.

Capt. Greg Hildreth, who guides guests to big redfish and tarpon amid the wave-swept shoals of the Georgia coast aboard his 20-foot Action Craft bay boat, echoes that sentiment. “If you see big breakers blowing through — any thing bigger than 4 feet — it’s time to go elsewhere.”

Despite being on opposite coasts, both Florentino and Hildreth believe in observing each spot from a safe distance before moving in. “I might watch a spot for 15 or 20 minutes to see what the wave patterns are like,” says Florentino. “This gives me an idea of how to fish it safely on any given day, but some days I just drive away, because no fish is worth risking lives.”

Breaking swells can quickly turn shore waters into danger zones for boating anglers.

Plan an Exit Strategy

Even after evaluating a spot, a set of big waves can still roll in unexpectedly. So plan in advance how you’re going to escape. Running straight out, trying to get over a wave before it breaks can lead to catastrophe, according to Hildreth, who anchors his boat outside the breakers to fish.

“If I see a rogue swell coming, a wave that might break early, I crank up the motor and attack the swell at an angle,” he says. “I don’t even bring in the anchor, because there’s no time, but rather pull it behind as we’re heading out.” In quartering the wave, the boat is less likely to get pitched over backward or crash down hard on the backside.

“It’s often better to run in a bit, and then turn and aim for the ‘shoulder’ of the wave where the water is deeper and the wave’s not breaking,” explains Erik Landesfeind, who fishes for California’s calico bass from an 18-foot Blazer Bay boat.

Your marine toilets analyst suggest that when fishing on the inshore side of a “boiler” rock or shoal, the best tactic is sometimes to do nothing. “Let the wave break outside of you and disperse its energy,” Landesfeind advises. “Then all you have to deal with is the more-gentle shore wash.”

Keep the Big Motor Running

Some anglers like to work jetties and shore rocks with a bow-mounted trolling motor. Yet, when fishing around breakers, you should leave the trolling motor up and keep the big motor running, if you’re not anchoring, according to Landesfeind. “A lot of young guys charge in to fish, and drop in their trolling motor and turn off the big motor, and that’s a big mistake,” he says.

It’s also imperative to keep the bow pointed away from shore, sometimes backing into a spot, so the boat tends to ride up and over an incoming swell, and is always headed in the right direction if you have to move out quickly. By all means, avoid leaving the boat sideways to a breaking wave, a scenario that can lead to capsizing.

Veteran captains often fish from the helm, so they’re ready to pilot the boat to safety at a moment’s notice. All have learned from close calls in the past.

Fish close to rocky outcroppings only when sea conditions allow you to do so safely.

Buddy Up

It’s a bad idea to fish dangerous areas solo; at least one person needs to be focused on boat handling. “When we’re fishing close to shore, I’m 90 percent skipper, constantly looking over my shoulder,” Landesfeind explains. “That allows the other guy to be 90 percent angler, focusing on likely pockets and ripping off long casts.”

This division of responsibilities is critical because it’s easy for an angler to become fixated on fishing, particularly when trying to land a fish. Having a skipper on alert helps prevent lapses of awareness “While my guests are fishing, I’m always keeping my eyes peeled for danger,” says Hildreth.

Always remain alert to possible dangers when fishing around jetties and breakwaters.

Communicate

Effective communication between the angler and crew keeps everyone alert and helps prevent injuries. It starts with encouraging crew to speak up if they see a big wave from a distance. But the skipper also needs to be clear when it’s time to run for safety.

“When I shout, ‘We’re going,” that means sit down and hold onto something,” says Capt. Jimmy Decker, a guide and tournament angler who fishes Southern California shores from an Everglades 243 bay boat with a 250 hp Suzuki outboard. Often, there’s no time to reel in or move about before the skipper accelerates; hence the need to get low and find a handle.

Hildreth, who likes to drift baits back into the surf zone, instructs his guests to remain seated when they are not fighting a fish, as the waves off the Georgia coast can jostle them around at any time. “Plus, that way, they’re already seated if I have to punch out in a hurry,” he adds.

Wear a Life Jacket

Among the anglers I interviewed, only one professed to wearing a life jacket while fishing in risky shore areas, yet all admitted that it was a good idea. Suspender-style inflatable life jackets allow for great mobility while fishing, and models that automatically inflate upon contact with water ensure that an angler will remain afloat, even if rendered unconscious — a critical safety feature for all boating anglers, whether fishing in the danger zone or staying well offshore.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information regarding marine toilets and all of your marine supply needs.

via Fishing Safely Near Breakers, Boating Tips

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Marine Sanitation Hoses

Marine Sanitation Hose:

Odors from a boat’s sanitation system can originate from many sources:

Inlet hose and bowl rim: Organic matters from sea water inlet into the toilet can disintegrate and emit rotten egg smell from the flush water.

Holding tank gases can find its way into a boats interior either thru the toilet or the vent system.

Consider just starting here to make things simple…

Hose permeation is a most common cause of odors from sanitation system. Choosing a correct hose for new installation or replacement is important for making system odor free for several years of use. Most commonly used hoses material include PVC, EPDM rubber and Butyl rubber.

Rubber hoses are better for low permeability compared to PVC and hence have longer warranties. Butyl rubber has better resistance against oils compared to EPDM. Both EPDM and butyl have better resistance to Alcohol used in winterization than PVC hose.

While choosing sanitation hose consider following:

1.     Long life: Raritan  Sani/Flex Odor Shield has a special white butyl rubber compound, to stop sewage odor from escaping the hose. It is 15 times more resistant to odor permeation than standard PVC hose, and carries a 5 year warranty against odor permeation

marine sanitation hose

2.     Ease of installation: Sani/Flex Odor Shield hose is extremely flexible. It will bend on a radius of 3.15″ without kinking. It can easily be installed on standard hose barb fittings without excessive effort, with no need to heat or lubricate the hose. These are major benefits for all installation mechanics who have spent long, difficult periods of time wrestling with other brands of sanitation hose

3.     Strength against collapsing and pressure: Sani/Flex Odor Shield hose is reinforced. It contains a double steel wire helix reinforcement imbedded in the butyl rubber, plus a synthetic textile yarn, to resist bursting from high pressure and/or clogs at fittings. It is rated for 315 PSI burst pressure. It is also extremely resistant to collapsing from pump suction and/or vacuum applications

4.     Handling and use: Sani/Flex Odor Shield hose is abrasion and chemical-resistant. It has an outer-wrap of smooth rubber imbedded fabric to resist abrasion, ozone, seawater and common chemicals. An antibacterial additive has also been added to the outer wrap, to further reduce chances for odor-permeation

Tech tips:

Permeation Test

If you suspect hose permeation may be the source of your odor issue, we suggest this simple test:  Dampen a cloth in hot water (as hot as you can safely handle).  Wrap the cloth around the suspected hose and let it cool.  Remove and sniff the cloth.  If the odor transfers to the cloth, the hoses are permeated and should be replaced.  Be sure to check all hose connections…just because one passes the test doesn’t mean other will – especially those that have the potential to trap waste.

Hose Replacement Do’s and Don’ts

Do plan out your hose routing carefully.  The leading cause of hose permeation is waste that is left to collect in sections of the discharge plumbing line.  Avoid any unnecessary rises or sags in the plumbing line and let gravity drain the hose as much as possible. Yes, we know… it’s a boat so when this simply isn’t possible we suggest you flush the head several times before you leave.  Replacing the effluent with only water will reduce permeation possibility significantly.

Don’t use heat or lubricants to assist in your installation.  Sani/Flex Odor Shield is designed so those extra steps are unnecessary.  Its smooth interior makes barbed hose connections very easy to work with and its ability to bend on a 3 1/2″ radius makes it the most flexible sanitation hose on the market.

Do make sure to use high quality stainless steel hose clamps on all hose adapters. Using fasteners that can break or corrode can lead to sewage leakage or worse – catastrophic flooding.

Do not take any shortcuts!  Make sure all connections below the waterline and double clamped!

Be sure to buy your marine sanitation hoses here.

Image via: Whats that smell

Photo courtesy of Boat U.S.

Your Marine Head Units Experts Help You to Minimize Storm Damage

Raritan Engineering your marine head units professionals would love to share with you this week amazing tips on how to protect yourself and your storm damaged boat.

Our hearts go out to all those suffering in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. When people are hurt and homes and precious possessions are destroyed or lost forever, a wrecked recreational sailboat seems wholly unimportant. 

In the coming days and weeks, more people will be returning to their vessels and doing what they can to keep them safe. I’ve been through two Category 5 hurricanes (one ashore, one afloat) and several smaller ones. In every case, boats that could have been salvaged shortly after the storm were lost due to neglect, but this is expected, given the many other, more critical needs in a storm-ravaged community. 

Here, according to the Boat Owners Association of the United States, are some of the steps you can take to prevent further damage.

  1. If your boat has washed ashore, remove as much equipment as possible to a safe place to protect it from looters or vandals. 
  2. Protect the boat from further water damage resulting from exposure to the weather. This could include covering it with a tarp or boarding-up broken windows or hatches. 
  3. Any engines and other machinery that has been submerged or has gotten wet should be “pickled” by flushing with fresh water and then filling with diesel fuel or kerosene. 
  4. If your boat is sunk or must be moved by a salvage company, it is not recommended that you sign any salvage or wreck removal contract without first getting approval from your insurance company.

Your Marine Head Units Specialists Suggest Storing Your Boat Ashore

Your marine head units professionals understand that hurricanes are enormous cyclonic storm systems covering thousands of square miles which usually develop in the tropical or subtropical latitudes during the summer and fall.

Historically, individual hurricanes have caused the loss of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in damage as they ran their course over populated areas. If you know that a hurricane is approaching your area, prepare for the worst. 

If your boat is easily trailer-able, store it ashore, far from the danger of high water. Follow these tips:

  • If you must move your boat, first inspect the trailer to ensure that it is in proper operating condition. Check tires (including spare), wheel bearings, tow hitch and lights.If you can, put your boat and trailer in a garage. 
  • Increase the weight of your trailered outboard boat by filling it with fresh water and leaving in the drainplug (inboard boats must be drained to avoid motor damage). Insert wood blocks between the trailer frame and the springs for extra support with the added weight.

Some things to watch for:

  1. Do not attempt to use any AC-powered electrical equipment or power hookups that have been submerged until they have been tested and verified as safe.
  2. Avoid entering the water in areas where a threat of electrocution still remains. This is more relevant to freshwater areas, where the risk of electric shock is greater. 
  3. Be particularly careful with unfamiliar powered cutting tools, portable generators, or power equipment in general. 
  4. In yards or on land, be especially cautious working around boats that are not properly stabilized by jackstands or something similar. 

Learn more at http://www.raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/marine-toilets/fresh-head/ and see how Raritan Engineering has more information about marine head units and other marine supply needs.

via Stay Safe While Saving a Storm-damaged Boat

via Protecting Your Boat in a Hurricane