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Marine Sanitation Device Specialists Encourages Safe Boating

Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation device experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding safe boating tips.

Your marine sanitation device professionals know that you’ve intended to sign up for the United States Power Squadrons safe-boating course for a while now, but the kids’ soccer practice always conflicts with the dates.

You left the dock well before dawn on an offshore trip to fish the Canyons. Your boat’s radar is working properly, but according to rule 6, Safe Speed, a vessel must be operated at a safe speed to avoid collision, with the operator taking into account visibility, traffic density, stopping distance, background lights, sea conditions, navigational hazards and the boat’s draft.

Your marine sanitation device experts know that to get to your favorite bay, you have to run a lengthy well-marked channel. As you do, another boat approaches rapidly from the opposite direction. In this event, you should refer to rule 14, which states that two power-driven boats meeting on reciprocal courses with a risk of collision shall each alter course to starboard to pass on the port side of the other.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/catagory-pages/sanitation-accessories/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine sanitation device and on safe boating tips at Raritan Engineering.

You are sharking at night, anchored, when you see a larger vessel making way, approaching well off your port side. You can clearly see a red all-round light on top and a lower white light in a vertical line, another white light in the direction of outlying gear, sidelights and a stern light. This means the vessel is a fishing boat engaged in fishing other than trawling.

While kingfishing in the Gulf of Mexico around some oil rigs, you spot a nearby commercial boat barely moving. Under Rule 3, General Definitions, any of the following conditions would qualify a vessel as restricted in maneuverability: It is engaged in laying, servicing or picking up a pipeline; it is engaged in dredging, surveying or underwater operations; it is engaged in replenishment or transferring people, provisions or cargo.

One of the engines on your twinoutboard center console overheated, and you are idling back to the marina. As you transit the narrow channel of a coastal river, a commercial vessel comes up behind you and sounds two prolonged blasts of the horn, followed by two short blasts. This signals its intention to overtake you on your port side.

Running to your favorite redfish hole involves crossing a congested bay with several marinas. In this situation you are required to avoid an anchored freighter with no one aboard and a sailboat underway.

So don’t forget these situations to be aware of when maintaining safe boating. 1) You left the dock well before dawn on an offshore trip to fish the Canyons. Your boat’s radar is working properly, but according to rule 6, Safe Speed, a vessel must be operated at a safe speed to avoid collision, with the operator taking into account visibility, traffic density, stopping distance, background lights, sea conditions, navigational hazards and the boat’s draft;  and 2) during a sailfish tournament, you are trolling off Miami’s government cut when a commercial freighter comes into view, heading toward your boat on an apparent collision course. In this instance, the vessel to starboard has the right of way.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on marine sanitation device and on how to maintain safe boating.

via Rules of the Road