Dan Dickison
 

Spare Engine Parts

Journeying sailors depend on their engines a great deal more than they like to admit. Although the internet has helped close the gap between parts providers and cruising sailors in far corners of the world, the long-term cruiser nevertheless needs to thoroughly consider which spare components and supplies he needs to carry with him.

Fuel Filters

We found fuel filter components all over the world, but obtaining the quantity and micron ranking we needed to have was no guarantee. Remember that you have at the very least a couple of filters: a remote main filter in between the tank and the engine, as well as a factory-installed secondary filter on the engine itself.

Fuel Injectors

Suggested service intervals for fuel injectors vary by manufacturer, but fuel contamination as well as carbon accumulation is such a typical issue that numerous cruising sailors carry at least one extra injector. If you bring a full set (certainly not cheap) you can still operate your boat while your injectors are being cleaned and serviced. (In the Caribbean, we mailed ours back to the U.S. for servicing).

Motor Oil

In case you’re picky about engine oil– and you should be– you might find your preferred oil in some countries. In some cases it is actually available under a different name, and with a little research you could sort this out. Generally speaking, you’ll manage to find diesel engine oil with the specified American Petroleum Institute (API) certification or its equivalent practically everywhere you can buy fuel. For long-term cruising, carry a minimum for six changes, or about 600 hours of engine operation.

Oil Filters

Oil filters are another concern. There are a lot of selections of oil filters in the world that it pays to do a little research. In Vanuatu, we discovered Napa filters that corresponded our Volvo filters but cost much less, but, once again, if you go this particular course you really want to make sure you are getting the right filter. The moment you do find the right filters, purchase them. They’re a lot harder to find than engine oil.

Belts

You’ll need spare V-belts with regard to you alternator, particularly if it’s the high-output kind. It is nearly impossible to evaluate the quality of a V-belt simply by looking, and when you leave the US, it’s harder to locate the industrial-rated V-belts that you need for high-output alternators. Most belts you locate abroad are fractional-horsepower automotive belts that won’t last long driving a 100-amp alternator, even if you have a dual-belt-drive system (extremely suggested high output alternators).

Gearbox

Most likely one of the most neglected component of the power train is the gearbox. Gearbox fluid does not last forever, but how frequently should you change it? A few engine owner’s manuals don’t even give replacement intervals. Mechanics Nick talked with said the oil in a common two-shaft gearbox, such as the Hurth, should be changed at least at every other engine oil change, or 200 hours of operation. This is simply a preliminary list, but it deals with the most common items.

Raritan is still the most dependable name on the water when it comes to reliability, service and innovation.

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How to Protect Your Watercraft’s Vinyl Seats

Just like you apply sun block to protect your skin– you also should think about protecting your vinyl boat seats from the effects of sun, weather and time. Within this all-hands-on-deck blog, we are going to walk you through a few of the best ways to protect your boat’s vinyl upholstery to prevent future needs for vinyl seat repair work and to keep it looking as good as new!

Step One: Clean Your Boat Upholstery. To clean vinyl surfaces in marine upholstery, make use of a good-quality boat vinyl cleaner– like Gold Eagle’s 303 ® Multi-Surface Cleaner. This particular cleanser cleans and brightens all water-safe surfaces, without leaving any type of residue or streaking behind. It will definitely keep you from needing to carry 15 cleaning products with you for the job. You need a soft brush, a few clean cloths, a toothbrush for crevices, and your high quality vinyl cleaner.To clean boat upholstery, adhere to the instructions on the product you choose. The basic way to clean vinyl is to:

Apply a light coating of vinyl seat cleanser right onto the seat and let it sit for about a minute. Meanwhile, arrange your cleaning supplies.

( SUGGESTION: If utilizing an old towel, cut it into quarter sections, as the smaller pieces make it easier to get into crevices and between cushions.).

Once the cleanser has sat a little bit on the surface, get the soft brush and work over the vinyl in circular strokes, using very little pressure. Vinyl is tough, but the 303 ® Multi-Surface Cleaner does the work for you.

Go over the entire surface of the seat in segments. Use the towel to remove the dust and grime that the cleanser loosens. When it comes to the piping and down into creases, use the toothbrush, just as you did the soft brush. Spray the cleanser straight onto the brush. Then follow with a clean area of towel.

( SUGGESTION: Always utilize a clean portion of the towel to ensure that you are not simply re-applying the grime to the seat.)

Step Two: Protect Your Vinyl Boat Upholstery303 Aerospace Protectant can help you protect most types of boat vinyl, including vinyl seats & more!

Right after your vinyl boat seats have actually been completely cleaned up, safeguard them with a product like 303 Aerospace Protectant. Safe and effective for rubber, vinyl and plastic surface areas, this specific product provides superior UV protection to prevent fading and cracking of the vinyl, repels blemishes, dust and various other stains, and leaves behind a dry, matte finish with no oily feel.

In order to protect your boat seats, abide by the directions on your product. When it comes to protectants such as 303 Aerospace Protectant, the basic standards are:.

Spray the protectant on the cleaned vinyl surface area, and wipe the spot completely dry. For better bonding as well as durability, buff a couple of times with a dry cloth. Repeat this particular procedure, along with cleansing, every three to five weeks so as to make the most of UV protection.

Make sure to comply with this particular cleaning and safeguarding protocol every time you use your boat and, whenever your boat is resting, at least once a week. Doing this will help ensure that your boat’s vinyl surfaces stay tidy, protected, and looking beautiful for years to come!

What to Do When Your Boat Seats Are Harmed.

Vinyl, while strong, sometimes is not strong enough. Either you’ve purchased a boat that was not well cared for, or somebody sat in the seats with a sharp tool in his or her pocket– and now your boat’s seats are damaged. Holes, splits, cracks, and tears happen. To help keep water and salt out of the inside of your upholstery, switch out damaged vinyl.

We offer a complete line of Raritan Marine Products to design your vessel’s marine sanitation system.

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