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Avoid These Problems When Getting Your Boat Loan

Raritan Engineering Company your macerating toilet specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding some great ways to get a boat loan. 

1. Check your credit. Your macerating toilet experts talk about how before applying for a loan get your current credit score and ensure your credit report is accurate. Scores above 800 may earn you a better interest rate. A free copy of your credit report is available annually from each of the three national credit bureaus at www.AnnualCreditReport.com. 

2. Find the right loan type. A fixed-rate, fixed-term, simple-interest loan is the most common. This offers the same monthly payment for the life of the loan. Variable rate or hybrid options may offer a combination of a fixed rate for a few years, and then a variable rate. 

3. Consider a HELOC. Buyers of smaller vessels often tap into their home equity line of credit (HELOC) to fund a boat purchase. That may work well if you plan to pay the boat off while interest rates remain relatively low. 

4. Compare loan rates. Generally rates are lower and available loan terms are longer for newer boats and larger loan amounts. However, each is dependent on a variety of factors including model year, loan amount and down payment. Be prepared for banks to require larger down payments, have higher rates and offer shorter terms on older boats, especially those more than 20 model years.

5. Don’t be fooled by ads. You may see rates advertised as low as 3.99 percent, but there usually will be some small print that could make that loan less attractive. For instance, the rate might only be fixed for a few years or the loan period might be only seven years.

Find your marine toilet of choice here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

6. Get pre-approved. To help save time, ask if you can get preapproval, or if you can possibly start the underwriting process before you have a signed sales agreement or even have a specific boat in mind.

7. Know your tax benefits. A boat can qualify as a second-home loan interest deduction if it has a berth, galley and head, so buying a boat with these features may offer a tax advantage. 

8. Get it surveyed. For pre-owned vessels, hire a qualified marine surveyor to inspect the boat to ensure it is in good condition and you won’t have any unexpected repair bills. BoatUS.com/Surveyors can help you find one. Also, many lenders will require a marine survey.

9. Ask about closing costs. As with any loan, there are some fees involved. Sales tax, processing fees, title and registration and/or US Coast Guard documentation fees are common. Check with your lender to find out what to expect.

10. Calculate your monthly payment. How much can you afford? Go to BoatUS.com/Calculator to easily crunch the numbers. Your lender will also review your debt ratio and other criteria.

A contract is more easily enforced if it’s in writing. Dealers often use standardized purchase agreements, but buyers have a right to protect their interests. By crossing out terms that are inappropriate and adding optional provisions or contingencies, you can tailor the contract to protect yourself. Check out our “Buyer’s Toolbox” to see how you can obtain a sample contract. It’s good to remember that the initial cost of buying a boat is not the biggest expense of ownership. An annual budget should include your boat loan (if financed), storage or slip fees, insurance, operation, and maintenance fees. One surveyor told us he recommends that in the first year of ownership, buyers should be prepared to spend 10 to 20 percent of the purchase price for repairs and updates. Commonly called extended warranties, service contracts are actually repair insurance policies. It is important to know that while the manufacturer’s name may be written on the literature, they’re administered by a third-party company. Service contracts don’t create a legal obligation between the manufacturer and buyer, so before you buy a service contract, read it over and make sure you feel the coverage is worth the money

So don’t forget these pointers when trying to get a boat loan. 1) Check your credit;  2) always compare loan rates;  and 3) ask about closing costs.

Millennials Who Sank A Boat Get $13,000 In Donations

A pair of millennials sank a boat they were not qualified to operate and received $13,000 in donations to buy a new one, according to the Daily Wire News.

Nikki Walsh and her boyfriend Tanner Broadwell decided to sell all their possessions and live a carefree life by sailing from island to island on a 50-year-old sailboat. Unfortunately, their dream came crashing to an end because of their lack of sailing experience.

After the couple sold all their possessions, they bought the boat and spent $10,000 on repairs. Once the repairs were done, they embarked on their journey. But there were two problems; they didn’t purchase insurance and neither of them knew how to sail. 

Not knowing how to sail can be forgivable. It’s dangerous, but not uncommon. But not purchasing insurance on a vehicle is not forgivable. This particular couple has not purchased insurance for their next trip yet.

Boating Safety Tips. Whether you’re a new sailor or have years of experience, it’s always good to know/review boating safety tips. According to Discover Boating, the first tip is to always be weather-wise. Before embarking on a trip, you should always check local weather conditions. If you notice that the clouds are starting to darken and the winds are picking up, they suggest that you get off the water.

Pre-Departure Checklist. Discover Boating recommends that everyone who is sailing on the boat go through a pre-departure checklist. That means going through fire safety and tips on how to fuel up. Going through the checklist is a good refresher in case people have forgotten. 

Choose your Raritan marine products here and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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I Learned About Boating From This: The Great Escape

Your Macerating Toilet Distributors Talk About How to Make Your Plan B for Boating Emergencies

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the importance of having a backup plan for emergencies while boating.

Your macerating toilet manufacturers talked about how the plan sounded good. I would cross Chesapeake Bay aboard my 16-foot outboard-powered Dory skiff for a weekend of hanging out with friends during Downrigging Weekend, an annual event held the last weekend of October in Chestertown, Maryland.

The weather report stated wind from the northwest at 17 to 23 mph, gusting to 34, with seas of 2 to 3 feet — borderline conditions for a boat like mine. But I balanced this against my years of experience operating small craft. Besides, my John Dory skiff is seaworthy for its size.

I set out. Halfway across the 10 miles of open water, it became tough to steer. Then the waves steepened considerably. While surfing down a large wave, the outboard motor clicked into the partway-up position, eliminating my ability to control the boat. 

It got uglier. I stuffed the bow into a trough and put 8 inches of water into the boat in a second. Noticing a smooth patch of water, I pulled the transom drain — the bilge pump was already working — and sped along at full throttle until the water was out.

Finally, I spotted a pier. Tied up, I lay down on the warm wood. The air was cold, but the shining sun warmed me. I rose, called my friends, and waited for them to pick me up.

From this experience, I learned you cannot fight wind and waves and sometimes must change course for safety’s sake. This makes it important to have a Plan B destination. I also learned that my waterproof VHF radio did not work, not because it shorted out, but because the ­speaker filled with water and I could not hear it. 

I was lucky. I was dressed correctly and wearing a life jacket. But I wouldn’t do it again.

Preparing for All Boating Scenarios

Just like in your home, you should implement an emergency preparedness plan on your boat. Regardless of where you boat you should always identify potential threats. Then evaluate what types of resources you will need if any emergency arises. 

You should always check the weather before planning a day on your boat. Conditions on the water can become dangerous during even small weather events. Weather is also quick to change over the water, it is important to stay aware and return to shore before conditions get severe. 

Tsunamis are a succession of oversized waves that occur after the displacement of large amounts of water. They can occur with or without warning, however, a common cause of tsunamis are earthquakes. If you are on the water and notice the trees on shore shaking and other telltale signs of an earthquake, you should evaluate your best course of action. 

Find your marine toilet of choice here at Raritan Engineering and see how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

A good skipper always prepares for the worst and hopes for the best. When preparing you should make a list of general items, but also include things that are specific to your family and their needs. The following are less specific items that any good boat emergency kit should contain. 

  • NOAA Weather Radio- Keeping track of the forecast and any emergency broadcasts can help you avoid severe weather.
  • Clean water- Salt or lake water are not going to be sufficient if you are stranded and need to stay hydrated.
  • Food and a way to prepare it- Store foods that are high in protein and nutritious. Having a heat source if not only good to keep you warm but also for preparing any foods that need to be warmed.
  • Extra clothing- Extra layers and dry clothes to change into from your wet ones are good to keep on board.
  • Shelter- Shelter from the sun and rain are both important. Many boats have built in shelters, but a tarp or sheet can easily be used as a makeshift shelter.
  • First aid kit- For anything from bumps and bruises to broken bones, bug bites and open wounds.
  • Paddle- In case you encounter engine troubles it is good to have an alternate form of propulsion.
  • Something to bail out water- If it rains hard enough your boat might not be able to keep up with pumping water out of the boat. Having a bucket or two to help bail it out can save your boat from capsizing.

Not only should you have a plan and the proper emergency items, but you should also take a class or research about emergency procedures. Things like first aid and boat repair techniques can make the difference between life and death. 

Don’t forget these important items when making your backup plan for boating emergencies. 1) NOAA weather radio;  2) clean water;  3) food and a way to prepare it;  4) first aid kit;  and 5) something to bail out water.

Small Boats for Big Emergencies

From top: When your raft is out of its canister or valise during servicing, you can check out all of its neatly packed components. In the water, ballast bags will fill and help stabilize the raft. Dur

Fully inflated and sitting in the middle of the workshop floor, our life raft looked rather small. This wasn’t the first time I had seen a Viking RescYou four-person life raft in all its glory, but it was the first time ours had been unpacked from its tidy black valise.

I sat in the strange orange glow with my legs fully extended in front of me, imagining three other people sharing the space. It would be cozy, to say the least. Even with only Steve and me, the ditch bag and any other items we might manage to grab, it would be tight. I tried to imagine what the raft would feel like afloat; the floor constantly undulating, the sound of the ocean crashing around us, the slick, sticky feeling of salty skin and damp clothing. 

Spending time in a life raft is probably not on anybody’s bucket list, but any sailor who has spent a night or two at sea has no doubt stopped to consider the possibility. Like an EPIRB, a search-and-rescue transponder, a sea anchor and a good medical kit, a life raft is a vital piece of safety equipment that should be on board every boat. 

A life raft packed in a valise is lighter than a canister, most weighing in between about 50 and 75 pounds, versus roughly 65 to 90 pounds for a canister. That said, a smaller crew member might not be able to lift that much dead weight up the companionway, especially if the boat is heaving. A canister may weigh more but is usually deployed directly from its storage location. 

Canisters often are fitted with a hydro-static release. This automatic device activates when submerged and inflates the raft if the vessel suddenly sinks. A “weak link” in the painter will part under stress, allowing the raft to float to the surface. It’s important to consider what obstructions might hinder the automatic inflation or release of the raft when choosing where to mount the bracket. 

What is often overlooked — and is of the utmost importance — is serviceability. After all, what good is carrying a life raft aboard if you cannot get regular safety checks and maintenance done on it?

In a typical service, after breaking the seals on the canister or valise and cutting open the interior vac-pack bag, the technician will remove, inspect and weigh the CO2 cylinder that is included to inflate the raft. This process is similar to dive-tank inspections and is extremely important because a raft might not inflate when the painter is yanked if it has a faulty cylinder. 

The cost of servicing a life raft fluctuates from port to port. The bill is usually broken down into a base service charge that includes unpacking, inflating, inspecting and repacking the raft. Any components that are required or supplies that are replaced are priced individually and then added to the base cost. 

Choose your Raritan marine products here and see how Raritan Engineering provides you the best quality and selection in the marine sanitation industry today.

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via I Learned About Boating From This: The Great Escape

via Preparing For All Boating Scenarios

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algae floating in water

Your Macerating Toilet Experts Talk About Why Fish Love Seaweeds

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the secret to successful fishing spots.

Your macerating toilet specialists discuss how on a summer morning when the blue, glassy waters 10 miles off Port St. Lucie, Florida, appeared devoid of life, a distant patch of golden-brown sargassum loomed enticingly on the horizon.

Anglers might call them weeds, but these are actually species of marine algae, with different types producing different game fish, depending on where you’re fishing. In the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean, the main species are Sargassum natans and Sargassum fluitans, both of which are holopelagic, which means they grow free-floating in the ocean and never attach to the seafloor during their life cycles.

That’s not to say that weeds are the only form of structure under which offshore life collects. Debris such as logs, palm fronds, wooden pallets, ladders and even the floating carcasses of cetaceans and pinnipeds can attract a chain of marine life. 

What’s the Attraction to Weeds?

Avid offshore anglers know almost ­instinctively that weeds can hold fish, but they might not know exactly what actually attracts fish to these spots. 

Much of the sargassum in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Eastern Seaboard originates in the ever-shifting and borderless Sargasso Sea, an aggregation of sargassum spanning approximately 1.4 million square miles in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean. 

Mahi Attracted to Sargassum

In a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration study off North Carolina, 81 fish species were documented using sargassum for shelter and food. “Most of these fishes are juveniles and occur within Gulf Stream waters.”

Data collected by the program indicates 60 to 70 percent of mahi that are caught are taken around sargassum along the East Coast, he says.

“Dolphin[fish] can grow to 40 pounds in 12 months,” Hammond points out. It takes a tremendous amount of food to fuel such fast growth, and mahi find much of their fodder under and around the weeds.

Interestingly, holopelagic sargassum depends on fish as much as fish depend on it, says Oxenford. “Sargassum relies on the feces of its inhabitants for nutrients,” she says.  

Finding Kelp Paddies Offshore

Schools of warm-water game fish such as mahi, striped marlin, yellowfin tuna and California yellowtail often migrate northward along the Pacific coast of Baja and Southern California in summer. In El Niño years, anglers might also get a shot at wahoo or blue marlin.

Yet, as with patches of sargassum, not all offshore kelp paddies hold game fish. Like that McDonald’s I mentioned earlier, but with no customers, some are devoid of large predators at any given time. While little or no scientific research exists on what makes one floating kelp patch better than the other for attracting fish, anglers rank paddies on a number of factors. 

It’s impossible to determine age, and recruitment times vary, Sepulveda points out, but schools of bait species, such as anchovies, chub mackerel and jack mackerel, under the paddy indicate that it’s mature enough to attract game fish. 

Fishing Near Sargassum

In the waters off Miami Beach, Florida, the best pieces of offshore sargassum are those concentrated into relatively large patches, says Capt. Jimbo Thomas, whose 42-foot Post, Thomas Flyer, is a top-producing charter boat in the region. 

If he sees a bait school, Thomas likes to drop a sabiki rig and catch a few to identify the species and add the prevailing forage to the livewell.

Find your marine toilet of choice here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

The same holds true on the West Coast, but frigates don’t reach as far north as Southern California. Terns, shearwaters and jaegers are prime indicator birds in this Pacific region. Flocks of terns fluttering low around a paddy serve as a sure sign of mahi or other predatory fish.  

Finding Weeds

Some days, weeds can be difficult for boating anglers to spot, particularly when large patches are scarce and an overcast sky or glare reduces color contrast. Choppy seas complicate the search. On any day, elevation helps — a big reason many fishing boats are equipped with towers.

Slowing the boat speed can also help, giving your eyes more time to scan the surface. Many anglers troll lures and/or rigged baits at about 7 knots while on the hunt. Captains encourage all crew members to stay on the lookout — the more eyes the better.

Brightenburg likes to shut down on the lee or down-current side of the weeds and then drift away, with live baits placed fairly far behind the boat, while chumming with liveys and chunks. 

Feeding Style

Some days, fish under a weed patch get finicky and refuse to bite most lures or baits. “Often, mahi get keyed in on small baitfish like 1-inch minnows under the weeds,” Thomas says. “They get their minds set on one thing and ignore everything else.”

Whether the golden-brown algae is kelp or sargassum, paddies, patches and lines of floating weeds rank among the most consistently productive offshore hot spots. 

Find Your Own Weeds

Moving in on another boat that has already found a productive weed patch is, to put it mildly, frowned upon by serious anglers. So-called poaching not only creates frustration among the crew that worked hard to find its own patch of weeds, but it can also result in ugly confrontations between the two boats. It also makes the offending skipper look like a hack. Better to hunt up your own patch than poach one and lose all respect.

So don’t forget these great tips on how to find your next great fishing spot. 1) Don’t encroach on another boat’s fishing area;  2) patches and lines of floating weeds rank among the most consistently productive offshore hot spots;  and 3) slowing the boat speed can also help, giving your eyes more time to scan the surface.

Oceans under greatest threat in history, warns Sir David Attenborough

The world’s oceans are under the greatest threat in history, according to Sir David Attenborough. The seas are a vital part of the global ecosystem, leaving the future of all life on Earth dependent on humanity’s actions, he says.

Previous BBC nature series presented by Attenborough have sometimes been criticised for treading too lightly around humanity’s damage to the planet. But the final episode of the latest series is entirely dedicated to the issue.

“For years we thought the oceans were so vast and the inhabitants so infinitely numerous that nothing we could do could have an effect upon them. But now we know that was wrong,” says Attenborough. 

Attenborough says: “Surely we have a responsibility to care for our blue planet. The future of humanity, and indeed all life on Earth, now depends on us.”

The series producer, Mark Brownlow, said it was impossible to overlook the harm being caused in the oceans: “We just couldn’t ignore it – it wouldn’t be a truthful portrayal of the world’s oceans. We are not out there to campaign. We are just showing it as it is and it is quite shocking.”

Brownlow said much of the footage shot of albatross chicks being killed by the plastic they mistake for food were too upsetting to broadcast. The programme also filmed on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016, witnessing the worst bleaching event in its history.

Carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning also dissolves in seawater, making it more acidic. Prof Chris Langdon, at the University of Miami, says it is “beyond question” that the problem is manmade. “The shells and the reefs really, truly are dissolving. The reefs could be gone by the end of the century.”

The noise from shipping, tourism, and fossil fuel exploration is also revealed as harming sea life. Steve Simpson, at the University of Exeter, who works on coral reefs in southeast Asia, says: “There is a whole language underwater that we are only just getting a handle on. They use sound to attract a mate, to scare away a predator. You hear pops and grunts and gurgles and snaps.” He shows the noise of motorboats distracting saddleback clownfishes from warning against a predator attack.

Overfishing, which remains prevalent around the world, is also addressed. “Every night thousands of miles of fishing lines laden with hooks are set – there is enough, it is said, to wrap twice around the world,” says Attenborough. But the programme also highlights some success stories, such as the revival of sperm whales off Sri Lanka and herring stocks off Norway after bans or restrictions were put in place.

 Orca, Herring fishing in Norway

Strict management of the herring fishery in Norway has saved it from collapse. Herring now draw in humpback whalesandorca. Photograph:AudunRikardsen

Pauly also warned of the dangers of plastic attracting toxic chemicals and then being eaten: “They become poison pills.” Pauly said the question facing humanity now was simple: “Are we going to fight for the oceans or not?”

Choose your Raritan marine products here and see how Raritan Engineering provides you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

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via Why Fish are Attracted to Weeds

via Oceans under greatest threat in history, warns Sir David Attenborough

Competitive sailing is only part of what these great little designs have to offer: they are also perfect for just taking a spin on a sunny day: (clockwise from top) the J/70, Ensign, Flying Scot and Archambault 27

Your Macerating Toilet Distributors Talk About Finding the Ideal Daysailer for You 

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why many people love daysailers.

How would you describe the ideal daysailer? Or a daysailer at all for that matter? Your macerating toilet manufacturer talks about how the basic concept is simplicity itself. And yet, over the years the term “daysailer” has come to include boats spanning the length and breadth of yacht design.

Even the proper length of a daysailer, an aspect of small-boat design that might seem self evident, has become a subject of debate, as the “daysailer” concept has come to include boats with LOAs of 40 feet or more.

Recently, in a vain effort to impose some order on the concept, we decided to break up the universe of daysailers into six categories. Bring on the letters to the editor! We’d love to know what you think.

Traditional Under 20ft

Among the most beloved daysailers are those that hark back to an earlier age. Indeed, in some cases these are boats that have enjoyed production runs spanning generations. Chief among these would have to be the cute-as-a-button Beetle Cat, which has been in production since the 1920s in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Other more recent entries in this sub-genre include Marshall Marine’s catboat line, Com-Pac Yacht’s Picnic Cat and Sun Cat, Bauteck Marine’s Bauer line, the NorseBoat 12.5 and 17.5, and the Crabber 17, 22 and Shrimper at the small end of the Cornish Crabber line.

One-Designs

As the old saw goes, put any two sailboats within sight of one another, and you’ll inevitably have a race on your hands. However, a funny thing happened on the way to the finish line for a number of smaller designs originally conceived as racers: they also turned out to be great daysailers.

Other standouts include the 23-foot full-keel Ensign, Sandy Douglass’s Thistle and Flying Scot, W.D. Schock’s Lido 14, and the S&S-designed Lightning, originally created for racing on Skaneateles Lake in upstate New York.

Find your marine toilet of choice here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Another brand-new entry in this category is the Chinese-built FarEast 18, available in both a standard and souped-up “R” version, complete with retractable bowsprit. Then there’s the French-built Archambault 27. 

Modern Classics 

One of the most gratifying trends in modern yacht design has been the growing number of “modern classics” out there, with sprightly sheer lines, gorgeous overhangs, low topsides, and cutting-edge fin keels and spade rudders below the waterline.

If there’s a downside to these boats it is that they tend to be pricey, especially those including lavish amounts of teak and varnished mahogany topsides. Still, there’s no getting around how well those low narrow hulls, tall, powerful sailplans and deep high-aspect underwater appendages perform out on the water. 

Weekenders

Since the dawn of “yachting” as a pastime, there have been sailors who take an almost perverse delight in building tiny boats that not only sail well, but also have a place to bunk out—a daysailing sub-genre that is as active today as ever.

Do some of these heavier designs push your personal definition of a daysailer? So be it. Kudos to these boats and their designers for making sailors, and our readers in particular, stretch their minds a little.

Multihulls

And now for something completely different.

Multihulls have traditionally been difficult to pigeonhole, and that remains true when considering them as daysailers. Is the Hobie 16 beach cat a daysailer? Why not? Too wet? Not serious enough? 

No matter what the specific design, it would be hard to find a better class of boats for a day of sailing.

Family Boats/Trainers

Family boats and trainers are perhaps the toughest to categorize, given all the different shapes and sizes they come in. Nonetheless, we all know them when we sail them: boats that are both forgiving and have enough cockpit space to accommodate at least one or two passengers. 

Among those boats created for the express purpose of training new sailors, the Colgate 26, created by Steve Colgate and naval architect Jim Taylor, is probably the most noteworthy. 

In many ways, these small to midsize trainers are the boats that first come to mind when many people think of daysailers, and for good reason. They might not be the sexiest boats on the water, but they’re pretty and a lot of fun to sail. 

So don’t forget these great ideas for your next daysailer purchase. 1) Size doesn’t necessarily matter;  2) older models can be ideal as well;  3) just choose the one you want to be in. There is no wrong choice.

They sailed a Tall Ship from Nova Scotia to France, what’d you do on your summer vacation?

Having grown up in Newfoundland and Labrador, Megan Dicker is no stranger to the ocean. But, this year, she got to sail across it.

“At first, I was anxious,” Dicker explained. “I didn’t know if I should try, because it seemed like such a wild adventure. But, at the same time, just the thought of sailing across the Atlantic encouraged me [to go].”

The 45 young people worked with the crew, learning how to put up and take down sails, and navigation techniques. She said it was physically challenging at the beginning. “By the end of the trip, it was easy-peasy.”

Gulden Leeuw

The youth traveled from Halifax to France on the Dutch ship, Gulden Leeuw. (Emma Davie/CBC)

When they weren’t on watch or taking tasks, the youth listened to and learned from each other. They came from all walks of life, and from many different communities.

“It was a reminder that you can do anything you put your mind to,” said Dicker. “I already knew that we have power within ourselves. But, going on that trip, it kinda amplified that feeling.”

Choose your Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via The Six Categories of Daysailers, and Why We Love Them

via They sailed a Tall Ship from Nova Scotia to France, what’d you do on your summer vacation?

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Your Macerating Toilet Distributors Why Immunizations Are Crucial Before Heading Out On Your Cruising Excursion

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet manufacturers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding great reasons why you should be getting your immunizations before going out on your sailing excursion. 

Your macerating toilet experts discuss how immunization can be an inconvenient detail in preparation for a long voyage, but it is crucial in order to ensure a safe and healthy one. The correct immunization depends on your health, medical history and destination. Immunizations exist for two reasons:

* To protect you from illness when you are exposed to harmful bacteria or viruses for the first time. Different cultures, fun as they may be, have different disease factors not found in North America.

* To protect populations at risk from contracting an illness brought in by you.

Factors in choosing appropriate immunization include:

* what immunizations you have had in the past

*your current state of health

* your destination

* your length of time you plan to stay in a designated spot.

* plan at least 6 months to 1 year in advance of your departure.

Immunizations come as a series of injections delivered over intervals of several weeks to months.

Find your marine toilet of choice here with us at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Most common diseases found in the third world countries are transmitted by the following means:

* mosquito bites.

* poor sewage treatment and contaminated water.

* sharing of body fluids or blood from an infected person to an uninfected person. * working with or increasing exposure to the native population, especially in the rural areas.

Mosquito-Borne Infections:

* Japanese encephalitis

* Yellow fever

* Dengue fever

* Sleeping sickness( African Tryponason)

* Malaria

Poor Sewage/Sanitation and Contaminated Drinking Water:

* Hepatitis A

* Cholera

* Typhoid fever

* Amebiasis

* Chagas disease

* Cryptosporidiosis

* Giardiasis

* Schistosomiasis

Blood Borne Diseases:

* Hepatitis B and C

* HIV and Aids

Air Borne Diseases

These travel with air droplets and saliva i.e., sneezes, coughs and people speaking to you.

* Tuberculosis

* Pertussus

With all of these in mind, it is necessary to reassess your destination and the diseases that are more rampant for that specific area. Then get inoculated accordingly. 

So don’t forget these important reminders about getting your immunizations early. 1) They are crucial for a safe and enjoyable voyage;  2) they protect you from illness when you are exposed to harmful bacteria or viruses for the first time;  and 3) they protect populations at risk from contracting an illness brought in by you.

Royal Caribbean canceled cruise, sent ship on rescue mission to Puerto Rico

Royal Caribbean has canceled an upcoming cruise in order to send a ship to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands on a mission to help hurricane victims.

The cruise line sent ships to St. Thomas and St. Martin to rescue a total of 1,700 people after Hurricane Irma struck the area.

According to the Miami Herland, travelers on the canceled voyage will get a full refund.

President Trump said earlier that week that the federal government has had difficulty getting aid to Puerto Rico, compared to other U.S. areas hit by hurricanes in the past months, because it is an island.

After pressure from lawmakers, Trump announced that he would temporarily suspend the Jones Act, easing shipping restrictions that have been stifling relief efforts.

Choose your Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via Immunization Schedule

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Your Macerating Toilet Specialists Talk About What Is Causing This Big Issue 

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this week regarding why we’re having so many hurricanes this year.

Your macerating toilet suppliers share how just as Hurricane Harvey wrapped up its devastation of Houston, Irma got into line behind it and quickly built into the strongest Atlantic hurricane in recorded history. Now, Maria leaves a broken Caribbean in its wake: Dominica’s rooftops and rainforests have been ripped to shreds, and Puerto Rico may be without power for months as a result of the storm. 

If you have a question about this hurricane season compared with recent years, we’ve got you covered: 

WHY IS THIS SEASON SO ACTIVE?

In short: atmospheric conditions were hurricane-friendly, and surface sea temperatures were warmer than usual. The Climate Prediction Center says that multiple conditions, such as a strong west African monsoon, have aligned to make the Caribbean Sea and part of the tropical Atlantic—a storm-spawning area called the “Main Development Region”—particularly well-suited to hurricanes.

“[Thermal potential] is a thermodynamic speed limit on hurricanes,” Emanuel says. “The greater the speed limit, the more favorable conditions are for hurricanes to form, and the more powerful they can get.”

WHAT CAUSED THE DROUGHT?

Largely, it’s an artifact of how we measure hurricanes. As Hart and colleagues demonstrated in a 2016 study, if you slightly tweak the definitions of hurricane categories, the “drought” mostly vanishes.

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“Tell the folks who survived [2007’s Category 2] Hurricane Ike that that wasn’t a major hurricane—it destroyed a large part of the Texas coastline,” says Emanuel. “Tell folks that Sandy wasn’t a major event… and it wasn’t even a hurricane.”

ALL THAT SAID, IS THIS SEASON UNUSUAL?

The longer it goes, the more severe it seems to get.

For starters, Irma made landfall in the Florida Keys as a Category 4 hurricane—the second Category 4 storm to make landfall on the continental U.S. this year. Such a vicious one-two punch hasn’t hit the U.S. in over a century, though 1954 came close, says Florida State University meteorologist Robert Hart. That year, the Category 4 Hurricane Hazel devastated the Carolinas, and two Category 3 hurricanes just missed landfall. 

Now, in less than a day, Maria has intensified from Category 1 to Category 5, battering Dominica at full strength, with Puerto Rico still in its sights. According to meteorologist Eric Holthaus, no Category 5 hurricane has struck Dominica since at least 1851. Prior to Maria, no Category 4 storm had made landfall in Puerto Rico since 1932.

DOES A MORE ACTIVE SEASON MEAN THAT MORE HURRICANES WILL HIT LAND?

Not quite. Forecasters caution that within a single year, there’s no solid relationship between the number of storms in a hurricane season and the number of landfalls. 

“Andrew, which occurred in 1992, was at the time the most expensive hurricane ever to hit the U.S., [and] that occurred in one of the quietest years we’ve seen the Atlantic, as a whole,” he says.

“People who are potentially in the path of a hurricane really need to pay attention and absolutely need to follow direction of emergency managers,” Emanuel says. “If you’re told to get out, get out—don’t mess around.”

HOW DOES CLIMATE CHANGE FIGURE INTO THE PICTURE?

It’s complicated, but there’s reason to think that a changing climate will have at least some impact on hurricane season activity. 

That said, in coming decades, predictions based on warming suggest that average-intensity tropical cyclones—Atlantic hurricanes included—will likely get more intense. 

Emanuel and the report both say that on average, individual hurricanes will drop more precipitation in the future, since warmer air can hold more water vapor.

Future storm surges may also worsen, says Emanuel—partly because the intense hurricanes that cause them will be more numerous, and partly because of sea level rise.

Don’t forget the helpful information found here as to why there are so many hurricanes occurring this year. 1) Atmospheric conditions were hurricane-friendly, and surface sea temperatures were warmer than usual;  and 2) the Climate Prediction Center says that multiple conditions, such as a strong west African monsoon, have aligned to make the Caribbean Sea and part of the tropical Atlantic—a storm-spawning area.

Choose your Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Why This Hurricane Season Has Been So Catastrophic

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Raritan’s Macerating Toilet Distributors Talk About Night Sailing Safety 

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the best ways to enjoy night sailing.

Your macerating toilets experts talk about how achluophobia, the fear of the dark, is the third most common phobia in the world, with nearly 75 percent of adults reporting some level of fear when the lights go out. According to researchers at the University of Toronto, the fear of darkness is directly tied to the fear of the unexpected. 

PLANNING

Weather and Course

All good sailors know that planning is essential to a successful trip, but when sailing at night it is paramount. Check multiple weather sources frequently and especially in the hours leading up to sunset. Make sure you have studied your charts and know your nighttime route thoroughly. 

Emergency Exit

While you are examining your charts, identify a few key locations (if applicable) you can divert to in the event that you face unexpected inclement weather. The lee of an island, a protected bay, or an alternative harbor facility are all options. 

Timing

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Plan the arrival at your destination during daylight hours, especially if you are unfamiliar with the passage or harbor. Arriving during the day gives you better visibility for unlit markers, natural hazards, and the advantage of knowledgeable harbormasters and dockhands to assist you.

WATCH KEEPING

Schedule

Unless you are sailing solo, it is a good idea to put in place a structured schedule to dictate watch keeping duties while sailing at night. A clear schedule gives all crew members accountability during the passage and prevents individuals from getting overly fatigued and making potentially critical mistakes.

Rotations

Standard watch keeping is set in four-hour rotations which is the amount of time needed for a full cycle of REM sleep. If there are two people aboard and you are traveling only for one night, the recommendation is to establish a four-hour solo shift, followed by a one-hour shift with both people on watch, followed by a four-hour solo shift. 

If there are more than two people on the boat, set up a rotation with a primary, secondary, and off-shift person. The secondary person is “on call” for assistance that the primary watch keeper may need while the off-shift person gets uninterrupted sleep.

PERSONAL SAFETY & COMFORT

Safety is always the most important factor to consider when sailing, and there are several safety rules that should always be observed when sailing at night.

Lifejacket

The first and most important rule is to always wear a lifejacket…and wear it correctly. It’s a hotly debated topic whether you should choose an automatically inflating vest or a manual one (read about The Great Inflatable PFD Debate and get the lowdown on the different styles from an expert). 

Stay Fueled + Warm

Food, hydration, and proper attire are important considerations for nighttime crew that are easily overlooked. Having snacks, water, warm beverages, and plenty of layers within reach can make your night shift more enjoyable. 

Think Ahead

Lastly, think of all the other things you may need to have on deck with you during your shift and have them ready when the time comes. A good kit might include a headlamp, spotlight, smart phone, headphones, Chapstick, Kindle, logbook, and writing utensil. 

VESSEL CONSIDERATIONS

Be Ready for Changes

If your vessel is not equipped with roller furlings, make sure that you have prepared before dark for potential sail changes, reefing, and wind shifts. If you think the wind is going to lighten up halfway through the night, have a larger geneoa rigged and ready at the bow for a quick and easy change between shifts. 

Reporters rescued after boat crash, harrowing night in hurricane-battered bayou

In a harrowing survival story emerging from Hurricane Harvey’s assault on southeast Texas, a pair of journalists documenting a seemingly routine civilian boat rescue survived near-electrocution and blunt force trauma, and clung to tree branches for 18 hours through hallucinations and relentless rainstorms before being rescued by chance late Tuesday morning.

Within minutes, the powerful currents were dragging the tiny vessel toward downed power lines 20 feet away in a swampy offshoot of Houston’s overflowing Buffalo Bayou.

“The boat hit the powerlines, shocked everyone, rebounded back toward me and [then] I remember seeing the black smoke billowing out of the boat.”

Like a bug zapper amplified 10 million times

The two reporters said they had just gotten settled into the bow of the boat and were in high spirits, joking around with each other and anxious to capture some compelling video of a rescue when the accident occurred.

“This went on for probably a couple hours and I kept on saying, ‘Hold on to more branches, hold on to more branches, hold on to more,’ and he finally said, ‘it’s breaking’ and ‘it’s broke’ — and I remember seeing his head bobble away and I remember thinking, ‘Oh no! Oh no!’

‘Desperate’

Soon there was nothing to do but wait. The rain was pouring down in sheets, darkness was moving in, and the men took turns calling out for help.

Before the afternoon rescue mission, Butterfield and Connellan had given little thought to alerting editors or local officials about their locations for safety’s sake. No one else knew where they were.

“I had some real hope that we were going to be rescued, but sadly no,” Butterfield said. “And then darkness fell.”

So don’t forget these helpful tips for enjoying night sailing. 1) Be sure to plan well in advance;  2) make a good schedule for watchmen;  and 3) be safety conscious.

Choose your Raritan marine products here from us at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via Sailing at Night

via Reporters rescued after boat crash, harrowing night in hurricane-battered bayou

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Your Macerating Toilet Specialists Talk About How to Keep Cool In the Summer While Boating

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding some cool ways to beat the heat.

Your macerating toilet experts talk about how getting out on the water is a great way to beat the heat. In this photo gallery, a young family uses a Sea-Doo Spark 3 Up and a Sea-Doo GTI SE with the new 90-hp engine to grab a cool slice of paradise. It notable, that they neither rode fast or hard, instead using the ease and shallow draft provided by a PWC to enjoy a day the land-bound can only dream about.

The trip was up the Silver River to nostalgic Silver Springs – one of the few ‘First Magnitude’ springs where you can drive a motorized vessel right up to the spring head. Most springs are roped off roughly 400’ from the spring head with boats being able to anchor at the rope and paddle up to the spring head on pool floats, kayak, paddle board or with dive gear.

As I ran down the bay with my family last evening, the temperature dropped noticeably as we approached the inlet. The tide was flooding, and cool tendrils of ocean water flowed into the bay dropping the local air temperature. When we left our back bay creek, we were sweating; by the time we got fully out into the ocean–just two miles away–we were reaching for sweatshirts. Boating always beat the heat. 

Splash The Deck

Water evaporating provides a cooling effect. Use the washdown hose, or a bucket, and splash down your fiberglass or wood cockpit sole. 

Find your marine toilet of choice here with us at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Install Hatches Hinged Aft

Deck hatches, or those in hardtops, are best installed so that they are hinged aft. This way, while anchored, any breeze will flow into the boat when the hatches are open. I realize some hatches are installed hinges forward on the premise that they will simply close, should a careless captain in a fast boat take off into the wind. 

Hydrate

Drink lots of water. Its what your body needs to cool down when the heat is up.

Cover Hatches and Ports

A dark cabin is a cooler cabin. While you can have custom hatch and port covers sewn by a canvas fabricator, simply draping towels ( a tarp, silver side up over all, would be the ticket in the desert or equatorial tropics) secured by lines or weights will reduce the solar gain and keep the cabin cooler.

Avo-sicles: Avocado Popsicles to Beat the Heat

As summer hits and temperatures start to soar into the sweat-all-day zone, you’ll need something to help cool off. Enter the avo-sicle, a quick and refreshing treat that is about to become your summer BFF. Think about it: As a fruit, avocados are sweet and creamy, the perfect base for a popsicle. And there are endless variations of avo-popsicle combinations! Check out these avo-sicle recipes that are great for kids and adults alike.

Avo 101

Since the base of every avo-sicle is (spoiler alert) an avocado, it helps to know how to pick the best one for the job. You’ll be freezing the popsicle immediately, so you’ll want a perfectly ripe avocado, which means when you gently press on it, it yields a bit to your pressure. Too much squish and it’s overripe, no squish at all means it’s unripe. Still confused? If your avo is unripe, just place it in a paper bag until it’s ripe (this works even better with a banana in the bag).

The Recipes

This avo pop from Avocados From Mexico is a great beginner recipe. It’s got pure avo flavor (especially if you use water), and a subtle spice from cinnamon and nutmeg, which hints at the avo’s Mexican origins.

If you want to complement avocado’s naturally creamy texture, try pairing it with coconut milk, as instructed in this avocado and coconut ice pop recipe from Avocado Central. It’s refreshing and lends the pop a tropical flavor that’s perfect for summertime.

Chocolate and avo is a no-brainer pairing — add a little fresh mint and prepare to be blown away. Mint is a great flavor to cool you down on a hot summer’s day. Bring a can of coconut milk and a generous handful of fresh mint leaves to a simmer. Set the milk aside to let it cool while the mint flavor infuses. Strain the mint leaves out and place the milk, along with the flesh of two avocados, into a blender. Add a banana, a generous glug of agave or maple syrup, 1 tsp. each of vanilla and peppermint extract, and 3 oz. of chocolate chips. Blend until smooth and pour into popsicle molds.

For a fruity popsicle, avo pairs great with a variety of other fruits. Berry-avo-pops are the perfect way to pay homage to your favorite summer-only fruit. Pineapple makes a tangy, delicious partner for sweet avo, as does mango. Use the basic avo-pop recipe above and mix and match to your heart’s content!

Avo-sicles are simple to make, have endless variety, and offer epic refreshment. Once your family tastes them, the only challenge will be keeping enough of them on hand all summer long!

Don’t forget to choose your Raritan marine products here with us at Raritan Engineering. We are always your number #1 choice for marine sanitation supply needs.

via Visit A Spring To Get Relief From The Heat

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Your Macerating Toilet Specialists Further Discuss Cool Ways to Get Your Kids to Love Boating 

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the secret to flotation science.

In order for ships to journey across the open sea, they must withstand the tremendous burden, or weight of the ship, along with the crew, luggage, supplies and passengers. Your macerating toilet suppliers talk about how they do that with a little help from the principles of density and buoyancy. 

That’s why when engineers talk about how heavy a ship is, you’ll hear them talk about displacement instead of weight. To keep from sinking, the cruise ship has to displace its weight in water before it’s submerged. That’s a lot easier to do if the cruise ship is constructed in a way so that it’s less dense than the water below it. 

Engineers help ships to achieve buoyancy by choosing lightweight, sturdy materials and dispersing the weight of the ship across the hull. The hull, or body of the ship below the main deck, is typically very wide and has a deep base line, or bottom. 

A round-bottom displacement hull looks like a large rectangle with rounded edges to dissipate drag, or the force exerted against a moving object. The rounded edges minimize the force of the water against the hull, allowing large, heavy ships to move smoothly along. 

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Like just about everything in our lives, round-bottom displacement hulls have advantages and disadvantages. Unlike a boat with a v-hull, which rises out of the water and s­kirts the waves, round-bottom hulls move through the water, making them extremely stable and seaworthy. 

The hull serves not only as stability but also as protection. Reefs, sandbars and icebergs can tear apart fiberglass, composite materials and even steel. 

Now that we’ve learned how these massive ships float, let’s look at the various propulsion systems that propel them from port to port.

The science behind floating was first studied by an ancient Greek scientist named Archimedes. He figured out that when an object is placed in water, it pushes enough water out of the way to make room for itself. This is called displacement.

Have you ever experienced displacement? Of course, you have! Remember the last time you got into the bathtub and the water level went up? That’s displacement. When you got into the tub, water got out of your way to make room for you, so the water level in the tub got higher.

An object will float if the gravitational (downward) force is less than the buoyancy (upward) force. So, in other words, an object will float if it weighs less than the amount of water it displaces.

A huge boat, on the other hand, will float because, even though it weighs a lot, it displaces a huge amount of water that weighs even more. Plus, boats are designed specifically so that they will displace enough water to assure that they’ll float easily.

Don’t forget to choose your Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering to always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via How Do Boats Float?

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Your Macerating Toilet Experts Share the Best Ways to Successfully Acquire This Skill

Raritan Engineering your macerating toilet specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the best ways to drop your water ski.

I learned to water-ski behind the family’s old lapstrake Lyman with a 40 hp Evinrude. It proved more than capable of hoisting 8-year-old me out of the water on two skis. But as I grew older and wanted to slalom, it didn’t have the juice to pull me up. 

Step 1

Your macerating toilet suppliers discuss further how to choose a slalom ski with an open ­binding — also called a rear toe plate — for the back foot. Many recreational-level skis not designed for competition will have this feature. Put your dominant foot in the front binding as this will be your lead leg while slaloming.

Step 2

Put the second ski on your other foot with the binding set as loose as possible so your foot can slide in and out of it with ease.

Step 3

In the water, execute a traditional two-ski start: arms straight, knees bent, let the boat pull you out of the water.

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Step 4

Once you’re up on the skis behind the boat, remain in the smooth water in the center of the wake until your driver circles back to your designated drop point.

Step 5

When it’s time to drop the designated ski, lift your heel and push down with your toes to free your foot from the loose binding. Your macerating toilet dept.shares talking about why you do not lift the ski out of the water; instead, work your foot free as smoothly as possible and let the ski drop behind you as the boat pulls you forward.

Step 6

When you are ready, carefully place your free foot on the back of the slalom ski and apply pressure with your toes.

Step 7

Once you are able to maintain your balance, slide your back foot into the open binding — try not to look down, but keep your focus forward on the boat’s transom.

Step 8

Once your back foot is secure, you’re ready to start carving in and out of the wake and developing that oh-so-impressive rooster tail.

Driver Tips

If you’re behind the wheel while a skier attempts to drop a ski, work out a plan with the skier beforehand. Once the skier is up, execute a short loop back to the skier’s starting point, preferably close to shore, where the skier can drop the second ski. 

You’re comfortable on a pair of combos, and you’re ready to step up to a slalom ski, but you’ve struggled with deep-water starts. 

Lifting a ski

Lifting one ski off the water is the first step in learning to slalom because it gives you the security of putting the ski back on the water if you start to lose your balance. To lift the ski, transfer all your weight onto the ski that you want to stay in the water – just as you would if you lifted one leg on land.

Based on the lifting exercise, pick your strongest leg. This will be your front leg once you’ve transitioned to a slalom ski. But first, you must drop a ski. 

Transfer your weight onto your strongest leg just as you did for lifting a ski, but this time keep the unweighted ski on the water. Do not lift the ski off the water or try to kick it off. Try to move as little as possible. Don’t rush to find the back toe plate – simply place your foot on top of the toe plate for the time being. 

Don’t forget to purchase your marine items here at Raritan Engineering, the answer to all your marine supply needs. 

via How to Drop a Water Ski

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