How to Bleed Hydraulic Steering

Your Macerator Pump Specialists Give the Instructions Needed to Bleed Your Hydraulic Steering Properly

Raritan Engineering your macerator pump distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding performance enhancing tips for your outboard engine.

Your macerator pump suppliers talk about how steering is arguably the most important system with respect to safe boating. When your hydraulic steering gets spongy, sloppy or otherwise unresponsive, it’s time to check everything for leaks, correct the problem, and then purge the system of air. 

Step 1

For a single-station, one-cylinder rig, start by screwing the filler kit onto a bottle of SeaStar hydraulic-steering fluid. Next, unscrew the vent plug at the helm and insert the hose from the filler kit. Invert and suspend the steering-fluid bottle in whatever way you can. 

Step 2

Allow the hose to fill entirely with fluid while you put clear plastic tubes onto the bleeder valves and run them into a ­container to collect the excess hydraulic fluid.

Step 3

The fluid will get low in the supply bottle as you purge, so you need to fill it again with either new fluid or the collected fluid from the bleed valves. Do not let the fluid get below the filler tube, or you will have to start over because air will be reintroduced to the system.

Browse our macerator pumps here at Raritan Engineering and see why we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Step 4

Have an ­assistant turn the wheel clockwise until the cylinder is fully extended. Open the right-side bleeder. Hold the cylinder in place with your hand while your assistant turns the wheel counterclockwise. 

Step 5

Stop turning the wheel counterclockwise. Open the left-side bleeder. Turn the wheel clockwise while you hold the cylinder in place with your hand. 

How to Add Fluid to Hydraulic Steering

You turn the wheel, and it feels sloppy or requires extra effort. It’s time to purge and add hydraulic fluid.

In this situation, you’ll need to get some hydraulic-steering fluid that meets Mil-Spec H-5606C standards, such as Sea Star/Bay Star No. HA 5430; an adapter hose, like Sea Star No. HA 5438; and a pushpin from the bulletin board in your office.

  • Thread filler tube into helm pump
  • Thread bottle of fluid onto filler tube
  • Poke a hole into the bottom of the bottle (or, cut the bottom off and create a funnel)
  • Turn bottle upside down (like an IV)

NOTE: AT ALL TIMES BE SURE THERE IS FLUID IN THE FILLER TUBE, IF IT DRAINS OUT YOU ARE PUMPING AIR IN THE SYSTEM AND YOU WILL NEED TO START OVER

  • Turn steering wheel hard to starboard
  • OPEN starboard bleeder nipple located on the steering cylinder
  • Turn steering wheel to the port side pumping air/fluid out of bleeder fitting
  • When an air free stream is seen, CLOSE bleeder nipple
  • Continue turning to the PORT side until engine comes hard over

TIP–puncture the bottle on the bottom side, not the very bottom, with the pushpin. Doing so enables you to place the pushpin back in and store a partially-full bottle on a shelf without leaks.

Diesel Outboard Engine

The Coast Guard currently uses both diesel and gasoline to fuel its surface fleet; while diesel is the dominant fuel for cutters and many boats, the service operates hundreds of gasoline-powered outboard engine boats.

The RDC, based in New London, Connecticut, is in the third phase of the project – actual testing of diesel outboard engine technology. Testing covers performance assessments as well as long-term reliability, availability and maintenance data collection. 

“Since this technology is so new, industry partners are just as eager as the Coast Guard to put real operational hours on these engines to better understand their capabilities and limitations,” said Lt. Keely Higbie, a member of the RDC’s Diesel Outboard Engine team.

“Training Center Yorktown has provided exceptional technical and operational expertise and support to date, working with both the RDC and industry to effectively integrate these engines onto their boat platforms,” said Lt. Carl Brietzke, the RDC’s Diesel Outboard Engine project manager. 

In addition to hosting a wide variety of Coast Guard personnel and other government agency stakeholders, Training Center Yorktown offers other benefits as well.

To initiate the project, the RDC conducted a market survey to determine the characteristics and development status of diesel outboard engines in the 150 to 300HP range currently available on the market. 

Ultimately, the analysis concluded that the Coast Guard can experience significant operation, maintenance, infrastructure and logistics cost savings through integrating diesel outboard engine technology into future boat fleet designs.

Other benefits of a single-fuel fleet:
• Improved interoperability with Coast Guard cutters, Department of Defense assets, and foreign nations due to increased fuel availability
• Reduced concerns about fuel availability during natural disasters or other major events
• Elimination of half of the Coast Guard’s fueling infrastructure

The results of the cost-benefit analysis were briefed to other government agencies and industry at the Multi-Agency Craft Conference in June 2016. 

“This project is a great example of government agencies working together to eliminate duplication of efforts,” said Lt. Steven Hager, Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (CG-926) domain lead for the project.

Don’t forget to reserve your items here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via How to Bleed Hydraulic Steering

via How to Add Fluid to Hydraulic Steering

via Research Development Test & Evaluation Spotlight: Diesel Outboard Engine

Three percent of BoatUS members who responded to a recent survey said fireworks displays are the only reason they will venture out after dark all year long.

Raritan Macerator Pump Specialists Give Ideas On How to Keep Your Family Safe During the Holidays 

Raritan Engineering your macerator pump suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding holiday boating safety tips.

Your macerator pump professionals share how three percent of BoatUS members who responded to a recent survey said fireworks displays are the only reason they will venture out after dark all year long.

BoatUS said the Fourth of July holiday period is shaping up to be the busiest time of the year for the nation’s recreational boaters, with boating traffic potentially surpassing last year’s levels.

The BoatUS member survey also showed that about one in three, or 36 percent, of respondents are “very to extremely likely” to operate a boat at night to see a Fourth of July fireworks display from the water.

Three percent said fireworks displays are the only reason they will venture out after dark all year long.

“With nearly 12 million registered boats on the water, boaters will need to take special safety precautions during the holiday period,” BoatUS Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean Water president Chris Edmonston said in a statement.

Browse our macerator pump selection here at Raritan Engineering where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

BoatUS is offering eight tips to boaters on the holiday — wait to celebrate with alcohol; the more lookouts, the better; go slow after fireworks; get kids’ life jackets free via the BoatUS Foundation’s free kids’ life jacket loaner program; don’t overload the boat; be a safe paddler; and urge people to never swim near a dock with electricity or in a marina or yacht club.

Lastly, BoatUS urged boaters to avoid the two biggest hassles.

“The nationwide TowBoatUS on-water towing fleet traditionally reports hundreds of battery jumps and anchor-line disentanglements over the holiday,” the group said. 

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is urging all boaters to use extra caution while boating during the upcoming July 4th holiday. The 4th of July, along with Memorial Day and Labor Day, typically account for more than one third of all boating related accidents and fatalities.

In light of the dangers, the Coast Guard Auxiliary is offering seven tips to stay safe while boating during this busy summer holiday:

  •  Always wear a life jacket: While in many areas of the country it’s hot and steamy, don’t be tempted to forgo wearing a life jacket. Accidents happen quickly, and often there isn’t time to put on a life jacket once an accident has happened.
  • Make sure your boat is properly equipped and that required equipment is functioning properly: The 4th of July is sometimes the first and only time people venture out on the water after dark. 
  •  Be prepared for emergencies: Accidents happen quickly, often with little or no warning. Take the time to familiarize your crew with basic emergency procedures, and show them how to contact authorities for help via marine radio or cell phone. 
  •  Boating and alcohol do not mix: Boaters are also reminded of the dangers of drinking and boating. Along with decreasing the operator’s ability to make good judgments, the consumption of alcohol also negatively affects the ability of passengers to respond in the case of an emergency on the water. 
  •  File a Float Plan with a friend: A float plan for a boater is similar to a flight plan for a pilot. It lists who is going, where you’re going, what the boat looks like, and when you expect to be back. 
  •  Practice the 3 Cs – caution, courtesy, and common sense: Use caution, especially in close quarter maneuvering situations with other boats. In such situations, slow speeds are better. 

By following these seven simple tips, you could save your life or the life of your passengers.

Don’t forget to reserve your items here at Raritan Engineering, where we know how to take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via BoatUS offers safety measures for Fourth of July boating

via Danger Ahead: 4th of July Holiday is the Busiest, and Often Deadliest Time of the Boating Season

 

Your Marine Products For Sale Experts Understand That the Challenges Can Be Mentally Draining

Raritan Engineering Company your marine products for sale professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to get over those mental obstacles. 

The path to Paralympic silver medals for the US Sonar team reached a turning point at the 2016 Sailing World Cup in Hyeres, France. Your marine products for sale analysts know that going into the final day, Rick Doerr, Brad Kendall and Hugh Freund were leading, which required them to wear yellow jerseys and compete with a large yellow dot on their sail. It was a big deal, and a lengthy wind delay did nothing to calm their nerves. 

“How do I coach that?” I asked Charlie McKee, the US Sailing Team’s High Performance Director. McKee connected me with the team’s sports psychologist Jerry May, who has guided Paralympic, Olympic, and professional, athletes across many sports.

Your marine parts house specialists understand that when the stakes are high, nervous energy is also high, so the challenge I faced with my Sonar sailors was to figure out how to knock down the stress. I started with what works for me, which is to acknowledge and accept that anxiety is natural and unavoidable. 

Your Marine Products For Sale Specialists Know the Need of Maintaining Focus As a Team

You can find more information as well as get assistance on any macerating toilet at Raritan Engineering.

Your macerating toilet experts know that to refocus the team, we wrote down process-oriented goals that were about enjoying the journey of learning. For example, some of these goals were about starting:

Line sights: Check it at least three times.

Final port tack approach: Jibe onto port into a low-density area to avoid traffic.

Choose where to set up on starboard: Tack either below or beyond a pack, not in it.

Each of these goals addressed something specific that we agreed might help their starts.

Your marine parts store professionals feel that to help temper emotions and the resultant stress, we worked on instilling a culture of forgiveness. Expecting perfection, then dwelling on what went wrong and who was at fault is counterproductive. 

“Instead, use a more task-oriented word that indicates what to do to increase the probability of doing the task well.” May suggested phrases like: “Hit the start line” or “stay present.”

“Think process and tasks,” he said, and a keyword for resetting when things go wrong. Your marine parts warehouse analysts know that ours was “Helicopter,” which referred to an idea that if we dropped the team into the middle of a race from a helicopter with no knowledge of what happened in the race so far.

Ricky Doerr, Brad Kendall and Hugh Freund hung onto their yellow jersey position to win the Worlds 6 weeks later in Medemblik, Holland by coming back from an 11th at the top mark and keeping their composure to finish third in the final race. 

Raritan Engineering Company has more information on marine products for sale, macerating toilets, and macerator pumps. 

via Overcoming the Mental Hurdles

Photo: World Sailing


Your Macerator Pump Professionals Feel the Need For More Internet Speed 

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week amazing tips on how to boost your internet speed while out on the water. 

As high-speed, cellular data service extends throughout the coastal U.S. and abroad, the ability to turn your phone into a mobile hotspot (MiFi) has diminished the need for a Wi-Fi connection to a shore-based network. 

In the October 2016 issue of Practical Sailor we look at the WiriePro ($700), an integrated antenna/WiFi adapter/router that allows you to quickly connect to the internet using either a shore-based Wi-Fi network or cellular service (2G/3G/4G/LTE). 

Every sailor knows that VHF radio range is dependent upon a good-quality antenna mounted as high as possible (see “3dB VHF Antenna Test,” PS February 2007 online). 

Plug “Wi-Fi” into the search box on Practical Sailor’s website, and you’ll see a number of articles dating back to 2009 on Wi-Fi boosters and antennas. These range from do-it-yourself solutions costing less than $200 (“An Experiment in Boosting Wi-Fi the DIY Way,” PS April 2014) to our recent report on the latest trend: combination antennas that work with both broadband cellular signals (2G/3G/4G/LTE) and Wi-Fi (“Wi-Fi Booster Versus 4G Cell Data,” PS June 2016). 

One of the first Wi-Fi boosters on the scene before the recent explosion in the “marine-grade” Wi-Fi antenna/boosters, was the original Wirie, developed by Mark Kilty and Liesbet Collaert while cruising aboard their 35-foot Fountaine Pajot Tobago, Irie. The new WiriePro uses the same basic package as the original.

The main problem with most of the Wi-Fi equipment we’ve tested is durability in the marine environment. Very few carry long-term warranties. Canada-based Bitstorm is the only maker that we know of who offers and extended 3-year warranty. But just because it doesn’t have the marine label on it, doesn’t mean it won’t last. 

Your Macerator Pump Experts Say Upgrading Is Not Always Needed

Your macerator pump specialists know that the WiriePro mounts the Bullet and a 2-dBi wide-band antenna for cellular service (xG/LTE) onto a hard-shell, waterproof (IP67) box. Inside the box is a commercial-grade 2G/3G/4G/LTE router, with access to the slot for installing a cellular provider’s SIM card.

When using cellular systems, The WiriePro will work with GSM carriers worldwide using 3G/4G networks with speeds up to 21 Mbps. In areas with LTE support, speeds of up to 100 Mbps are possible. 

There are also some upgrades specifically geared toward sailors, like an optional, integral GPS ($25) that—so long as you are connected to the internet—lets friends follow you online using the free Spotwalla service. 

It took testers about a half-hour to temporarily install The WiriePro using the hardware provided. (This did not include running cables through the hull, which would have added another hour or so.) 

Most techies recognize that they can set up a Wi-Fi adapter using Ubiquiti’s Bullet for less money (as we have done ourselves), but the Bullet’s native firmware is not the easiest for a novice to manage. In fact, the more simplified interface is the main reason many users will pay more for systems from Wirie, Bitstorm, or Rogue Wave. 

Learn more from us here at Raritan Engineering this month about macerator pumps as well as other great marine products.

via A Simplified Internet Connection for Boats

 

Macerator Pump 1 y0Uhd2
Macerator Pump by Raritan Engineering

FEATURES OF THE RARITAN MACERATOR THAT SEPARATE IT FROM THE COMPETITION:

Designed to empty marine and RV holding tanks of normal waste and fish boxes of scales and residual waste. The unique dual-cut blade design ensures waste is ground up thoroughly. Marine pump out must be in proper discharge zones only.

Optional Waste Valve Assembly isolates the waste matter from the pump during maintenance. This new features allows you to remove the pump without disconnecting plumbing.

• All stainless steel bolts to avoid corrosion problems.

• Spring loaded Viton shaft seal is used to prevent premature leaks

• Our proprietary rubber impeller compound allows longer dry running time.

ALSO AVAILABLE

SMART MACERATOR PUMP CONTROL

MONITORS MOTOR AND PUMP TO PREVENT DRY RUN AND OVERLOAD.

The optional Smart macerator control monitors pump motor and prevent pump damage due to priming failure or dry running. It also protects motor against overload. If power to control is not turned off, smart control will prevent impeller sticking by jogging impeller once every seven days of non- use.

SMC control has following features:

• If pump doesn’t prime in 7 seconds or runs dry for 5 seconds control will shut down pump.

• SMC control can be reset by turning off and on switch. Power need not be turned off.

• If power is not turned off to the control, control will jog macerator pump for few milliseconds every seven days to prevent binding of impeller.

• If pump draws more than 20 amps, control will shut down pump.

Purchase Macerator Pump Here

5 things in your pocket

Your Marine Products Pro Shop Knows What All the Professional Sailors Keep In Their Pockets 

Raritan Engineering Company your macerator pump analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding essential tools not to leave at home when sailing. 

Your macerator pump experts know that YBW asked professional and amateur sailors what they kept in their sailing jacket pocket when they are out on the water. What do you keep in yours? 

5 things in my pocket:

Knife – I never sail without a knife
Phone – Especially if I am sailing on the coast. It also has my nav software on there and I can get weather information
Waterproof case for the phone, as electronics and seawater don’t mix
Piece of flapjack which has to be homemade
Cup of tea…it’s not really in your pocket…oh..perhaps a compass.

Dee Caffari

Dee Caffari has sailed around the world five times.

Your marine parts suppliers professionals know that in 2006, she became the first woman to sail solo, non-stop, around the world against the prevailing winds and currents and was awarded an MBE in recognition of her achievement.

In April 2011, she successfully completed another circumnavigation. Your marine parts and accessories analysts understand that with completion of the Barcelona World Race, Caffari became the only woman to have sailed three times around the world non-stop.

During training, the team successfully claimed the Round Britain and Ireland speed record for a female crewed monohull in 4 days 21 hours and 39 seconds.

Your Macerator Pump Professionals Continue the Discussion on These Essential Tools

You can find more information as well as get assistance on boat toilets and on essential tools never to leave at home while sailing at Raritan Engineering. 

5 things in my pocket:

Tissues, as my nose runs
Lip salve
Electrical tape as you always have to mark something
Wet Notes so I can write information down
A treat – my favourite is Harabo Starmix
(BTW – I keep my Leatherman on my belt!)

Nigel Stuart, Managing Director of Spirit Yachts

Your boat toilets specialists understand that Nigel Stuart joined Spirit Yachts as managing director in August 2014 following seven years at Discovery Yachts.

Your marine parts distributors experts feel that in his younger years, he sailed dinghies in the UK, Germany and Hong Kong before he developed a passion for wind surfing aged 16.

In his thirties, Nigel returned to the UK and started actively racing catamarans with his wife, Sarah. In 2013, he built his catamaran CROWNS (which is an acronym of the initials of his family) in epoxy carbon using infusion method.

With over 20 years’ marine management experience, Stuart has worked with cruising yachts worldwide and is a successful catamaran racer in his spare time.

5 things in my pocket:

Knife/Multi-tool
Race watch as I do a lot of racing
Lip balm so I don’t burn my lips
Sunglasses
Beer tokens i.e money!

So don’t forget these helpful reminders for ideas on what not to leave at home when going sailing, knives, phones, waterproof cases for the phones, sunglasses, watches or lip balm.

Raritan Engineering has more information at their marine products pro shop on macerator pump, boat toilets, boat cleaning products, and on things you should never leave at home while sailing. 

via 5 things in your pocket

image

image via CO and Fume Detectors

Your Marine Toilet Specialists Know the Importance of Keeping Your Loved Ones Safe 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine toilet analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to save lives by choosing the right fume detectors. 

Your marine toilet experts understand that having one or more sources of fuel on board presents a potential danger, especially if you are unaware of leaks or vapor accumulation. Fuel can include gas, diesel and gas burning appliances for cooking or heating.

Your toilets for boats specialists know that many boaters have some serious misconceptions about fuel fumes in the bilge or engine compartment. One is that the engine blower will eliminate dangerous fuel vapors prior to starting a gasoline engine. 

Your macerating toilet experts know that on a typical enclosed boat you should have detectors and associated alarms that alert you to the presence of CO, fumes (including fuel, solvents gasses and others) and smoke.  This normally means that you need more than one type of detector. You may even need more than one of the same type of detector.  For example, a smoke detector in an airtight engine space won’t help you with a galley fire. 

You can find more information as well as get assistance on macerating toilet and on how to save lives by choosing the right fume detectors at Raritan Engineering.

Your Marine Toilet Professionals Show You How to Buy the Right Detectors

The good news is that some detectors will detect more than one type of problem. For example, your portable boat toilets professionals know that some fuel vapor detectors will not only detect gas fuel vapors, they may be able to detect other combustible vapors such as cooking fuels, hydrogen, solvents, and certain cleaning compounds. 

What you get for your boat depends on your boat, its systems, its layouts and many other factors. And even if you feel entirely confident of your boat (and you shouldn’t) keep in mind that other boats in the marina or at the anchorage may be emitting, for example, CO, which is entering your boat through its vents or ports. With all this in mind, check the specifications for the detectors you buy to be sure that you’re well covered. Different detectors perform differently. 

The Effects of Carbon Monoxide

Carbon monoxide (CO) needs special mention. It can overcome a person quickly it can be fatal in just minutes-see the chart below. Your porta potties for boats analysts know that the most prevalent source of CO is exhaust from gasoline engines and generators.

Since carbon monoxide is colorless and odorless, the installation of CO detectors aboard all recreational boats is recommended. The American Boat and Yacht Council now requires all new boats with gasoline inboards or generators to have a CO detector installed.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers when making the decision to buy your next carbon monoxide detector. 1) Having one or more sources of fuel on board presents a potential danger;  2) there is good news is that some detectors will detect more than one type of problem;  and 3) carbon monoxide can overcome a person quickly and can be fatal in just minutes.

Raritan Engineering always has more information on marine toilet, macerating toilet, macerator pump, and on how to save lives with carbon monoxide detectors.

via CO and Fume Detectors

Raritan Engineering of Millville, NJ has recently launched a macerator pump with a new design through a video which can be watched on YouTube. The revolutionary design reduces 99.9% of any waste matter spillage. 

Raritan Engineering manufactures equipment for pleasure boats throughout the world. Its products include marine toilets, waste treatment systems, icemakers,sanitation materials, and water heaters. The company designs products that help maintain an environmental balance and ensure the quality of marine sea life. Products such as macerator pumps allow Raritan to do its part in preserving sea life. The product is made to empty holding tanks in boats’ toilets to which allows safe waste discharge and management. Raritan representative Joe explains: “For starters, a macerator pump is designed for a boat’s toilet to empty the holding tank on a boat. Holding tanks are installed on toilets, and their job basically is to hold waste until boats can discharge it into a dockside pump, facility,” said Joe. “Macerator pumps are responsible for emptying holding tanks effectively–they include a bronze cutter to grind waste down to its smallest size, allowing efficient waste management. This means it guarantees an easier discharge, and boaters can be sure that they are adhering to proper environmental standards.

“The macerator pump’s new design comes with a wastewater valve, which allows for pump maintenance with no spillage, it is a direct replacement of competitive units, which eliminates waste. The video explains the pump’s features and key improvements. Raritan Engineering’s design allows users to remove the pump without disconnecting plumbing. Another feature is easy maintenance, as owners can simply shut off the valve and remove the screws. In addition, the macerator pump is made from stainless steel bolts to avoid corrosion. A spring-loaded Viton shaft seal is also used to prevent leaks, and a proprietary rubber impeller compound allows longer dry running time. An optional Smart Macerator Control monitors the motor and pump to prevent dry run overload.

Raritan Engineering is currently developing more products that will help promote sanitation and effective waste management systems for boats. The company is driven to keep marine sea life safe, as well as in helping customers find more ways and solutions to make sure installations are fully in line with local regulations concerning discharge.

Marine Toilet YPAt9p

Maintenance Tips for MarineToilets

Raritan Engineering Company your Marine Toilet supplier would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding Raritan marine toilet maintenance.

Cleaning the Lines

Your macerator pump experts know that heads flushed with salt water accumulate scale deposits in the discharge channels and hoses. Scale deposits cause a head to get progressively harder to flush, and it is scale on the valves that allows water in the discharge line to leak back into the bowl.

Avoiding this problem is as easy as running a pint of white vinegar through the head once a month, without using a macerator. Move the vinegar through the head slowly, giving the head a single pump every 4 or 5 minutes.

Marine Toilet Specialist Summarizes Key Points

If you suspect you already have a scale build-up, dissolve it with a 10% solution of muriatic acid, not using a pump, available from most hardware stores. The acid won’t harm porcelain, plastic, or rubber parts.

Your electric toilets experts suggest that you pour two cups of acid into the bowl. It will fizz as it reacts with the calcium deposits on the bowl valve. When the fizzing stops, pump the head–intake closed–just enough to empty the bowl without using a macerator. This moves the acid into the pump. After a few minutes pump again to move the acid into the discharge hose. Let it sit a few more minutes before opening the intake and thoroughly flushing the toilet and lines. The acid is “used up” as it reacts with the calcium, so heavy scaling may call for more than one treatment.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on electric toilets and on marine toilet maintenance tips at Raritan Engineering.

Lubricating

To keep the pump operating smoothly, follow your monthly vinegar flush with a dose of oil. The best choice is a lubricant intended for marine toilets, but you can also use mineral oil.

The usual treatment is to let a little water into the bowl, pour in a couple of ounces of lube, and pump this through the toilet. This method is adequate, but less than ideal because it lubricates only the discharge side of the pump.

While you are servicing the head, lightly coat the piston rod with Teflon grease. This will prolong the life of the piston-rod seal. 

Odor

Electric marine toilets need not stink, but they often do. The discharge hose is, by far, the most common culprit. To check yours, rub the hose with a damp, clean cloth, then sniff the cloth, without using a macerator. 

Leaking connections are another source of odor, and you can use your cloth the same way to locate a leak. Also check the seal around the piston rod, perhaps near the pump.

Another common source of head odor is grass and other marine life trapped inside the flush-water passage under the rim of the bowl. Prevent this by installing a strainer in the intake line. 

An anti-siphon valve in the discharge line can also release odors into the boat. A properly installed valve vents outside the cabin area. 

Overhaul

If the toilet gives off a foul odor but it isn’t leaking, if it is difficult to pump but the discharge hose isn’t clogged, or if it just isn’t working right, it is time for an overhaul.

So don’t forget these helpful points on how to maintain your marine toilets. 1) Cleaning the lines;  2) Lubricating and pump maintenance;  3) Odor maintenance;  and 4) the need to overhaul.

Raritan Engineering has more information on macerator pumps, electric toilets, marine toilet, and how boat toilets work.

via Marine Toilet Maintenance

Macerator Pump by Raritan Engineering

Raritan’s Macerator pump is designed to solve problems and failures associated with other macerator pumps. Most macerator pumps on market can only run dry for very short period of time. Raritan’s proprietary formulation of nitrile combined with thermoset housing allows the Raritan Macerator pump to run dry 30% longer than other pumps on the market today.

During our development of our Macerator pump, Raritan discovered another common failure among other macerator pumps on the market is shaft seal failure. The Raritan Macerator pump uses a Viton spring loaded shaft seal to extend life of seal. Viton material can withstand the various chemicals used in holding tank treatment and being spring loaded, prevents leaks during low pressure idle (non-pumping) time.

Many of our competitor’s pumps have been known to fail due to corrosion of pump mounting bolts. For that reason Raritan’s Macerating pump includes all stainless steel hardware to prevent corrosion due to sewage and chemicals.

One major problem with maintaining a typical macerator pump is the spillage of sewage when the inlet and the outlet are disconnected. Raritan’s Macerator pump is available with an optional waste water shutoff valve to isolate the inlet side sewage line and a standard quick disconnect fitting on the discharge line of the pump. Our waste water valve is compact, fits in a small space and operates with only a 1/4 turn rotation of the gate slider.

The pump motor used in Raritan’s macerator pump is protected internally with a thermal PTC cutout. In the case of overheating or overloading the motor will shut down and protect itself from failure. An optional Smart Macerator Control (SMC) is available to monitor our pump. Raritan’s Smart Macerator Control (SMC) monitors the motor and pump to prevent dry run and overload. Our SMC control will shut down the pump if the pump does not prime within 7 seconds or if the pumps runs dry for 5 seconds or if pump draws more than 20 amps. The SMC will jog the macerator pump for few milliseconds every seven days during idle time to prevent binding of impeller.

 Raritan Macerator Pump Customer Service

Raritan products also come with legendary Raritan customer service support. Customers can call Raritan’s customer service for entire life of product and speak to technical support personal free of charge. The average wait time for speaking to “live person” is less than one minute.

All parts for Raritan products are stocked in the U.S. and available for same day shipping. Most orders for Raritan macerator pumps are shipped within 24 hours, after receipt of order.