Your Macerator Toilet Distributors Give Suggestions On How to Prepare for the Winter Raritan Engineering your macerator toilet manufacturers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to get ready for winter sailing.

During my admittedly few winters above the frost-belt, I have only fond memories of the last few days of the season. And I’ve always admired those who didn’t let the tilt of the Earth dictate the way they arranged their days.

This month, Practical Sailor contributor Drew Frye reviews measures to take if you plan to extend your sailing through the winter.

Practical Sailor readers who have been with us for a few years are familiar with Frye’s work, much of which is carried out from the deck of his PDQ 32 catamaran.  The boat, as far as I know, has not spent a full winter out of the water since Frye bought it.

Frye’s climbing habit routinely makes its way into Practical Sailor’s pages. His past research into fiber lifeline chafe and elasticity in deck cordage drew directly from his own experience with climbing ropes.

Your macerator toilet experts discuss how a related pursuit that occupies Frye is the endless search for ways to reduce onboard weight. As the owner of a catamaran, he recognizes that for many sailors, every equipment upgrade presents an irresistible opportunity to shave extra pounds.

One of the finer pleasures of winter sailing is the solitude it affords. As Frye wrote when he first pitched the story, “It has always seemed a shame to me that the great majority of boats in the country are only used in the summer.

So don’t forget these important reminders while preparing for winter sailing. 1) Don’t let hidden chafe doom your efforts to ditch wire lifelines;  2) consider using lightly used climbing ropes if you are comfortable with it;  and 3) bring lots of hot beverages.

Sailing in winter sounds like a cold and tricky business – but if you take some simple precautions there should be nothing stopping you.

Who hasn’t looked enviously from the deck of their laid-up boat in a yard on a crisp, sunny winter’s day at a boat sailing gently by, a steaming mug of tea in the owner’s hand. In the right conditions, winter sailing can be a joy.

But winter weather windows can be small, and you need to act fast if you want to make the most of a day on the water. Your reward will be a low sun, flat water and deserted cruising grounds.

Here are some tips and tricks to make you and your boat winter-sailing ready.

1. Keep your tanks topped off
It’s worth filling up with fuel and water as often as you can in the winter: fuel berth opening hours are likely to be reduced, and hoses may freeze or the water supplies may be turned off to protect the pipes – which makes it tricky to refill your tanks!

2. Fuel tank
Another reason to keep your fuel tank topped up for winter is to reduce condensation. A full tank has much less empty surface area for it to form, and thus less chance of diesel bug forming, especially if you also use an anti-diesel- bug additive.

3. Engine
For boats left afloat in salt water, it’s unlikely that the temperatures will dip low enough to cause any water left in the engine to freeze, but it’s worth attending to if a particularly cold snap is forecast. Make sure the coolant is topped up with the correct mix of antifreeze, and if you’re really worried, run some antifreeze through the raw-water system.

4. Batteries
Starting a diesel engine from cold in winter temperatures will require more power than it does in the summer, so it’s worth making sure your batteries are topped up – either by a small solar panel, or by taking them home for a recharge now and then.

5. Bedding
If you’re keeping your bedding on board so you can make a quick getaway, consider storing it in a vacuum bag. These keep linen and duvets dry and mildew-free: the air can be sucked out with a 12V vacuum cleaner if you’re not on shore power.

Click here for more information regarding Raritan Engineering and macerating toilets. We are your #1 experts in marine sanitation supplies.

via Gearing Up For Winter Sailing

via 26 Tips For Winter Sailing

U.S. Navy file photo

Raritan Macerator Toilet Experts Talk About How Caution Is Needed When Salvaging Storm Damaged Boats

Raritan Engineering your macerator pump manufacturers would like to share with you this week some information regarding how to properly rescue a storm damaged boat.

When people are hurt and homes and precious possessions are destroyed or lost forever, a wrecked recreational sailboat seems wholly unimportant. But for many people, the boat is their home or is connected to their livelihood.

In the coming days and weeks, more people will be returning to their vessels in the wake of Hurricane Harvey and doing what they can to keep them safe. I’ve been through two Category 5 hurricanes (one ashore, one afloat) and several smaller ones.

Here, according to the Boat Owners Association of the United States, are some of the steps you can take to prevent further damage.

If your boat has washed ashore, remove as much equipment as possible to a safe place to protect it from looters or vandals. 

Protect the boat from further water damage resulting from exposure to the weather. This could include covering it with a tarp or boarding-up broken windows or hatches. 

Your Macerator Toilet Professionals Continue Discussion on the Best Way to Save Storm Damaged Boats

Your macerator toilet specialists talk about how any engines and other machinery that has been submerged or has gotten wet should be “pickled” by flushing with fresh water and then filling with diesel fuel or kerosene.

If your boat is sunk or must be moved by a salvage company, it is not recommended that you sign any salvage or wreck removal contract without first getting approval from your insurance company.

To that advice, I’d add the following: BE CAREFUL!

Some things to watch for:

  1. Do not attempt to use any AC-powered electrical equipment or power hookups that have been submerged until they have been tested and verified as safe.
  2. Avoid entering the water in areas where a threat of electrocution still remains. This is more relevant to freshwater areas, where the risk of electric shock is greater.
  3. Be particularly careful with unfamiliar powered cutting tools, portable generators, or power equipment in general. 
  4. In yards or on land, be especially cautious working around boats that are not properly stabilized by jackstands or something similar. 
  5. If you will be making an insurance claim or seeking assistance from federal agencies (available to those who work or live on their boat), take pictures of boat damage or damaged equipment, and keep a log of any efforts you take to prevent further damage.

At least 4 loaded Bristol Bay fishing boats swamped in bad weather

At least four commercial fishing vessels partially sank in Bristol Bay after boats heavy with salmon had difficulty navigating poor weather in the region.

Colclough said good Samaritan vessels assisted in recovering everyone on board and no one was injured. He did not know Monday how many people were rescued.

But the sinkings come as the salmon season in Bristol Bay ramps up. Alaska Department of Fish and Game area biologist Tim Sands said fishing in the area had been getting progressively slower since the end of last week, but that Monday morning the sockeye run surged.

Official tallies for the day won’t be available until Tuesday, but Sand received reports of vessels delivering up to 17,000 pounds of fish to processors Monday. The average delivery is closer to 3,000 pounds.

Jean Barrett, port director for the city of Dillingham, said he received reports of winds up to 40 miles per hour on the bay Monday. A boat sinking in Bristol Bay is rare, Barrett said, and multiple boats in a single day even rarer.

No fisheries have closed as a result of this incident, but a nearby cannery suspended purchase of fish from the area of the grounding as a precaution. 

In an emergency order Monday, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game warned fishermen to be alert to any fuel sheens in the areas surrounding the sunken vessels.

 Have you ever wondered how a macerator pump works?

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via Stay Safe While Saving a Storm-damaged Boat

via At least 4 loaded Bristol Bay fishing boats swamped in bad weather

Monica McFawn

Raritan’s Macerator Toilet Specialists Give Tips to Consider Before Buying a Storm Damaged Boat

Raritan Engineering your macerator toilet suppliers would like to share with you this week information regarding the importance of using caution when buying a storm damaged boat.

If you are in the market for a used boat and live where winter storage is the norm, now is probably one of the best times to bargain. The owner is looking at another year of storage bills for a boat he no longer wants, and he knows that trying to sell a boat that’s buttoned down for the winter is like trying to sell a house that’s under a circus tent.

However, if you are anywhere near the pathway of last year’s Hurricane Matthew, that bargain boat might well turn out to be your worst nightmare. Back in 2007, we published a special report on what happens when a fiberglass boat is subjected to the point loads that can occur during a storm. 

One recurring theme in the three Practical Sailor articles I cite above is that severe structural issues can quickly turn a bargain boat into bottomless moneypit. Here are just three of the serious problems to look for.

Macerator Toilet Experts at Raritan Engineering Share the Secrets to Finding the Right Deal on Your Next Boat

Core damage — Your macerator toilet experts talk about how once the outer skin of a cored hull or deck is breached, the core damage can spread widely. Most often, this is a long-term process as plywood or balsa (probably the most common core material in production sailboats) rots. A Matthew boat that has suffered a breached hull or deck might have damage limited to a small area that might be relatively easy to address. 

Secondary bond failure — The chemical bonds between interior structures (such as bulkheads, pans and liners, and furniture) are generally not as strong as bonds formed during the molding process. 

Hidden structural failure — Mast, keel, and rudder loads spread throughout the boat’s hull. This means that a simple grounding can cause damage in places far away from the point of impact. It is not uncommon that a boat that has grounded hard shows structural failures in unexpected areas of the deck, main bulkhead, or mast partners. 

Submerged engine — Beyond the obvious problems such as water-stained woodwork, ruined upholstery, and mold and mildew, there are less obvious problems associated with a boat that has sunk. A diesel engine that has been damaged by salt water can often be resurrected to run temporarily without addressing corrosion issues that can come back to haunt a new owner. 

We strongly encourage anyone contemplating buying a storm-damaged boat to work closely with an experienced surveyor. Taking on the challenge of restoring an insurance write-off is not for the faint of heart, and in many cases, does not make economic sense. 

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Buyers Beware of Post-Storm Bargains