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Your Marine Head Specialists Discuss How to Loosen Up Those Tight Nuts and Bolts 

Raritan Engineering your marine head distributors would love to share with you this week these great pointers on how to unstick pesky bolts and nuts.

My friend Nick and I had a discussion the other day about which bolts were tougher to break free: shaft coupling bolts or the lug nuts on an old trailer.

The muscles, in this instance, were those of Dustin Rahl, owner of a very busy mobile trailer service in Sarasota, Fla., Trailers 2 Go. The axle on the trailer for our Catalina 22 test boat Jelly (aka Our Lady of Perpetual Despair), had cracked at the weld, so that its left wheel splayed outward at a 20-degree angle.

But what happens if the PB isn’t enough? Carefully applied heat from a butane, MAPP-gas, or propane torch is usually the next step. After that, it’s time to break out the specialty tools.

Like a chef with a favorite set of sauce recipes, a good mechanic needs a tried-and-proven list of tricks to help coax rusted fasteners into submission. Their tools range from penetrants and ingenuity to pure brute force.

When good nuts go bad, its time to call in the bone crushers.

One unusual but effective fastener-freeing technique involves massive thermal change that causes an abrupt material expansion or contraction.

Your Marine Head Suppliers Are Happy to Supply You With These Amazing Tips

Sometimes, all a bolt needs is a few good wacks to loosen the bond, but be careful! You don’t want to damage the threads. Your marine head  professionals continue discussing that if you can only approach from the threaded end of a bolt, you can put another nut on the bolt and tap that — not too hard.

The rusting process also degrades bolt head shape. A last ditch effort may require a pair of Vise-Grips or sockets designed to grab deformed bolt heads. For stuck, slotted-head bolts, an impact screwdriver can be a real lifesaver.

I’d be interested in hearing of other tried-and-true methods for un-seizing the seized.

If you work on a boat you already know nuts and bolts freeze with frustrating frequency. Sometimes it’s a carbon steel bolt corroded solid on a cylinder head. Other times it’s a stainless steel bolt frozen solid in an aluminum lower unit.

Begin with fire. An oxy-acetylene torch works best. The downside, if you don’t already own one, they are expensive to rent and complex to fire up. And because of the inherent danger of working with an open flame near an inboard gasoline engine tucked into an enclosed space, first run the bilge blower for several minutes to ventilate the area.

Know that sometimes the flame blossoming from the common propane torch may hold enough BTUs to get the job done. Either way, oxy or propane, heat the bolt. No need to go red-hot, but hot enough so droplets of water flicked onto the bolt sizzle off into a vapor.

An alternative to fire is ice. Some mechanics claim dry ice will shrink a bolt enough to break corrosion’s hold. Though most of us choose a torch because it’s quicker if not more dramatic. Besides dry ice, there is another cool option. It is an aerosol spray that freezes metal ice cold, more particularly a blast of freeze spray, an aerosol that super chills metal parts to minus 72 degrees Fahrenheit.

Sometimes the corners of bolt head round off making it impossible for a wrench or socket to grasp hold. Calmly reach for a center punch and a ball peen hammer.

Never use force. Just get a bigger hammer. When you are willing to sacrifice the bolt, position the wedge tip of a cold chisel against the corner of the bolt head or nut and bang away with repetitive strikes of a ball peen hammer.

Finally, assembling fasteners with anti-seize compound in the first place is a good way to keep fasteners from corroding in the first place. For example, on new outboards I remove all the bolts in the lower unit, one at a time, coat them with anti-seize and then replace.

Click here and see how you can get more information regarding all your supply needs at Raritan Engineering.

via More Boat Tips: Unsticking Stuck Nuts and Bolts

via How to Remove Stuck Nuts and Bolts

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Boat Head News Dept Says: Stonehill College student, Linsey Malia, killed in Copenhagen boating crash

A student attending Stonehill College in Massachusetts is one of two women who died when a jet ski crashed into a boat Saturday in Copenhagen.

Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts confirmed Linsey Malia, class of 2018, died in the boating crash.

The college released a statement Sunday afternoon that reads:

“The Stonehill community is deeply saddened by the loss of Linsey Malia ’18. As a peer mentor, a teaching assistant, a member of the Moreau Honors Program, a work study student within Athletics, and a volunteer with multiple campus partners. Linsey was a model student and member of the College community. We ask that the media give her family and friends space as they take time to process this tragedy and grieve.”

Jim Malia, Linsey’s uncle, who lives in Bellingham, posted on Facebook that he received a call from the US Embassy in Denmark stating she was killed in the boating accident.

“We are all heartbroken that such a beautiful life was cut short at age 21,” he wrote. “Rest In Peace Linsey. We all love you.”

Malia was one of four students who played Ace the Skyhawk, the college’s mascot, at various athletic events. She is listed as a psychology major and sociology minor

The two American students were part of DIS – Study Abroad, according to a statement from DIS posted on Facebook. The second American student who died has been identified as Leah Bell, a Louisiana native and student at California’s Pomona College.

A Facebook post by the Christ Episcopal Church in Louisiana identified Bell as the victim. She is from Covington, Louisiana.

“It is with overwhelming sadness that we write to inform you that the oldest daughter of Jeff and Liz Bell, Leah Bell, was killed in a tragic boating accident in Copenhagen yesterday during her study abroad,” the post states. “Jeff and Liz are on their way to Copenhagen and their daughter Rebecca is here with friends. Every loss is painful – and if we are human, we have or will experience such loss. But the loss of a child is particularly devastating. We ask that you please hold the Bell family in your prayers and close to your heart during this difficult time.”

DIS said seven students were boating on a personal excursion in the Copenhagen Harbor when a “high-speed jet ski” hit the boat.

“Tragically, two DIS students were killed as a result of the accident,” the statement from DIS says. “This incident is incredibly difficult. DIS is a strong community and the ties to these students involved in the accident are broad and deep. DIS is focused on individual support and counselors are available to all students.”

The five other students were released from an area hospital.

The Copenhagen Post reports the students were celebrating the end of the spring semester and authorities in Denmark have arrested nine people in connection with the crash.

Riding jet skis in the harbor is illegal, the Copenhagen Post reports. The incident remains under investigation. Some people riding the jet skis fled the scene, according to the newspaper.

via Stonehill College student, Linsey Malia, killed in Copenhagen boating crash

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Patrick Childress

Your Marine Head Units Professionals Understand that Annual Frustrating Inspection Time

Raritan Engineering Company would love to share with you this week this helpful information on how to better understand your life raft inspection time. 

Spring is when many sailors have to bite the bullet and have their life raft inspected, an expense that costs 10 to 30 percent of the price they paid for the raft—or more.

In the U.S., there is no inspection requirement for life rafts on recreational boats. Inspection guidelines are set by the manufacturer. In Europe and other parts the world, rafts for recreational boats that sail offshore are supposed to meet ISO Standard 9650-1. This standard allows for an inspection interval of up to three years, but manufacturers often specify shorter intervals, especially for boats that spend most of their time in the tropics. 

The experience of the owners of the 14-year-old, six-man, valise-stored Avon life raft pictured here reminds us of the importance of following the manufacturer’s inspection schedule, however onerous and costly it might seem.

However, because the interval can be as long as three years in newer models, it is not surprising that some owners (and even some inspection stations) are not aware of this. Regardless, the owners of this particular raft, like many cruisers, waited nearly five years between inspections. 

The owner’s experience raises an important point about purchasing a life raft. When respected brands are passed between investment groups and production is moved overseas to save costs, quality control and service support can suffer. 

Your Marine Head Units Analysts Explain How Servicing Your Life Raft is Crucial

Your marine head units experts know that when it comes to any life raft, service support is just as important as the raft itself. In fact, many life rafts are sold with very small profit margins, with the expectation of additional profits through routine servicing. 

A pioneer in the world of inflatable boats, Avon was acquired by French competitor Zodiac in 1998. Zodiac stopped making Avon life rafts in 2004, and then scaled back to two Zodiac brand life rafts. 

To complicate things, several Zodiac-related brands have been spun off, and there is another “Zodiac” life raft on the market. During the economic downturn, British-based Survivetec acquired the Zodiac brand for commercial (SOLAS) life rafts, sold under the SurvivetechZodiac label. 

A State of Flux

It is not clear if all of these SOLAS-compliant facilities on this list are authorized to inspect Zodiac’s new recreational rafts. Zodiac’s list of approved facilities for the new recreational rafts is available here. Having a SOLAS-trained technician inspect your life raft is not necessarily a bad thing, but most life raft manufacturers require you use their certified inspection stations to maintain warranty protection.

The elastomer used to make the Avon life raft pictured above is chloroprene rubber (CR), also known as neoprene. Another elastomer common among inflatable boats is chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSM), known by the brand-name Hypalon. 

Zodiac Nautic’s new life rafts are made of plastomers, and the company is working with the owners of the raft in these pictures to provide a replacement. The new offshore model is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and the new coastal raft is made of polyurethane (PU). 

If your life raft is up for inspection in the coming year, you can often negotiate a cheaper price and surely get faster service if you do it in the late summer, fall, or winter, after the spring rush in the recreational market.

Click here and find out more information regarding marine head units and all of your marine supply needs at Raritan Engineering.

via Know Your Liferaft Inspection Requirements

Photo courtesy of Boat U.S.

Your Marine Head Units Experts Help You to Minimize Storm Damage

Raritan Engineering your marine head units professionals would love to share with you this week amazing tips on how to protect yourself and your storm damaged boat.

Our hearts go out to all those suffering in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. When people are hurt and homes and precious possessions are destroyed or lost forever, a wrecked recreational sailboat seems wholly unimportant. 

In the coming days and weeks, more people will be returning to their vessels and doing what they can to keep them safe. I’ve been through two Category 5 hurricanes (one ashore, one afloat) and several smaller ones. In every case, boats that could have been salvaged shortly after the storm were lost due to neglect, but this is expected, given the many other, more critical needs in a storm-ravaged community. 

Here, according to the Boat Owners Association of the United States, are some of the steps you can take to prevent further damage.

  1. If your boat has washed ashore, remove as much equipment as possible to a safe place to protect it from looters or vandals. 
  2. Protect the boat from further water damage resulting from exposure to the weather. This could include covering it with a tarp or boarding-up broken windows or hatches. 
  3. Any engines and other machinery that has been submerged or has gotten wet should be “pickled” by flushing with fresh water and then filling with diesel fuel or kerosene. 
  4. If your boat is sunk or must be moved by a salvage company, it is not recommended that you sign any salvage or wreck removal contract without first getting approval from your insurance company.

Your Marine Head Units Specialists Suggest Storing Your Boat Ashore

Your marine head units professionals understand that hurricanes are enormous cyclonic storm systems covering thousands of square miles which usually develop in the tropical or subtropical latitudes during the summer and fall.

Historically, individual hurricanes have caused the loss of thousands of lives and billions of dollars in damage as they ran their course over populated areas. If you know that a hurricane is approaching your area, prepare for the worst. 

If your boat is easily trailer-able, store it ashore, far from the danger of high water. Follow these tips:

  • If you must move your boat, first inspect the trailer to ensure that it is in proper operating condition. Check tires (including spare), wheel bearings, tow hitch and lights.If you can, put your boat and trailer in a garage. 
  • Increase the weight of your trailered outboard boat by filling it with fresh water and leaving in the drainplug (inboard boats must be drained to avoid motor damage). Insert wood blocks between the trailer frame and the springs for extra support with the added weight.

Some things to watch for:

  1. Do not attempt to use any AC-powered electrical equipment or power hookups that have been submerged until they have been tested and verified as safe.
  2. Avoid entering the water in areas where a threat of electrocution still remains. This is more relevant to freshwater areas, where the risk of electric shock is greater. 
  3. Be particularly careful with unfamiliar powered cutting tools, portable generators, or power equipment in general. 
  4. In yards or on land, be especially cautious working around boats that are not properly stabilized by jackstands or something similar. 

Learn more at http://www.raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/marine-toilets/fresh-head/ and see how Raritan Engineering has more information about marine head units and other marine supply needs.

via Stay Safe While Saving a Storm-damaged Boat

via Protecting Your Boat in a Hurricane

Your Marine Supplies Professionals Suggest Regular Fire Prevention Checks

Raritan Engineering Company your marine supplies experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to avoid those nasty boat fires. 

Your marine supplies specialists know that although the exact cause of Tuesday morning’s roaring, three-boat fire at Santa Cruz Harbor has not yet been officially released — an unattended space heater is suspected — the stunning incident should serve as a warning to all West Coast boaters and marina operators. 

In our opinion, fire aboard a boat — whether offshore or in a safe harbor — is the ultimate boater’s nightmare, as fuels can explode, crew can become trapped, and boats (especially those built of fiberglass) typically become engulfed quickly.

Your marine parts suppliers professionals feel that an electrical investigation is pending, but regardless of the exact cause, the bottom line is that I could easily have lost my boat, along with many precious possessions, and my neighbors’ boats could have gone up in flames also.

What precautions can be taken?

• Don’t leave heaters on when you’re not aboard.
• Don’t use damaged or questionable shore-power cables.
• If you see signs of previous overloads (burn marks) on dockside receptacles, report them to your harbormaster.  
• Have plenty of extinguishers aboard and check them often.

Your marine parts and accessories analysts understand that boat fires are ridiculously rare. You’re much, much more likely to actually perish from a car accident, plane crash or even a cataclysmic storm than you are to even be injured from a boat fire. 

Your Marine Supplies Analysts Know That Most Boat Fires Are Caused By Electrical Issues

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts at Raritan Engineering.

1. Careful, Sparky

Your marine parts specialists know that most boat fires are caused by electrical issues, with wire chafe at the top of the list. Builders do their parts to follow standards and provide proper circuit protection (chafe protection, fuses, breakers, ignition-protected components, etc.), and you can help by keeping an eye out for chafing and making sure electrical connections remain tight and corrosion-free. 

Tip: Your marine parts distributors experts want you to know exactly how to shut off the power (battery switch, main breaker, etc.) in the event of a fire; otherwise, the fire can easily restart after being put out with an extinguisher.

2. People Don’t Plan to Fail, They Fail to…

If your fire plan consists of “I know I have at least one extinguisher somewhere on this boat,” then you could do better. Knowing the exact locations of extinguishers (and how to use them) and how to quickly secure the engine, blowers and electrical power are good starts. 

Tip: This is for crew too. They should have a clear understanding of what to do, even if only to put on a life jacket and await further instruction.

3. Really — Has It Been That Long?

Does your boat sit for months (or even years) between outings? That could spell trouble. There were actually reports of an uptick in boat fires after the recession because, after as long as five years, people could finally afford to use their boats again.

Tip: Get the boat in shape and take it out for a shakedown cruise a few weeks before bringing friends and family aboard. 

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine supplies, marine parts, and marine head units

via Fire Aboard: Every Boaters’ Nightmare

via How to Prevent a Boat Fire

Your Marine Head Units Specialists Say That Kiteboarding Can Be As Simple As Sailing 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine head units analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the excitement of kiteboarding.

World Sailing, the world governing body for the sport of sailing, claims that Kiteboarding on water is a discipline of sailing, and as such falls under the jurisdiction of World Sailing.

IFKO’s Paes Fernandes considers that riders must be unconditionally free to participate in any national or international competitions without fear of penalties from organizations or sponsors.

Your marine heads units experts know that the GKA will be sanctioned by World Sailing to run World Championships and World Cup events in the Kiteboarding expression performance disciplines of wave, strapless freestyle, big air and twintip-freestyle and slider/obstacle events.

Simply put, California has tons of places to go kiteboarding. Whether you’re seeking some of the best waveriding in the States, smooth flatwater, top-shelf instruction, or just looking to get on the water, your riding options are endless.

Weather

California is famous for its weather. People move here because the weather is so good—especially in Southern California. Your marine supplies Miami professionals know that having just moved to SoCal myself, this seems true; the weather is nice (at least compared to the Northwest, where I came from), with an occasional rainstorm here and there.

When people say the weather is amazing here, they generally are not thinking like a kiteboarder.

They’re not talking about the huge diversity of places to ride, each of which offers unique and constantly evolving weather conditions.

Visiting

If you’re planning a kiteboarding trip to California, you need to prepare for what time of year you visit, where you’ll ride, and your equipment needs. Your marine supplies Tampa analysts feel that kite sizes and gear preferences are exceptions, of course.

• Wetsuits: If you’re coast-bound, chances are you’ll need a 4/3 wetsuit. This is true the further north you go. During winter, consider a thicker suit and layer. In the summer, wear a 3/2 shortie or ride in trunks inland and in the southern areas.

Your Marine Head Units Professionals Know That Great Weather Means Kiteboarding Weather

You can find more information on marine products as well as get assistance on marine head units at Raritan Engineering.

• Kites: If you bring a quiver stacked with every size from 7 to 20 m2, you probably won’t miss a day on the water. However, most of us don’t have such a luxury. Your marine head units specialists know that if you don’t already know, check with one of the local shops for details on what you should bring.

• Boards: If you’ll be chasing swell or playing in beach break, bring a skim or waveboard (wave-specific kiteboard). If you’ll be riding inland, bring a twin-tip. California has a well-deserved reputation for its surf, so bring a surfboard.

• Gear on demand: With the evolution of high-performance equipment, many shops and schools offer demos of the latest gear. Check out the school and shop lists for contact details. And keep your eye out for brand-specific demo tours.

Beginner Beaches

If you’re looking to take a lesson in California, your options span throughout the state. Your marine supplies Seattle experts know that many of the beginner locations featured in this article are more than just beginner places.

Local knowledge

• Launch and land kites in designated areas only (never in the bike path).

• If you happen to get coated with Third Avenue’s notoriously stinky mud (especially on low tide), use the hose behind the windsurf rigging area to wash yourself and your gear off.

• The upper launch area can be slippery when wet. Consider using a launch assistant in addition to an experienced kite launcher.

• Be careful of the questionable winds at the lower launch. Consider the upwind launch for easiest access to the water.

• Don’t ride or jump too close to the point (where the bike path makes a 90-degree turn); the wind direction can be unexpected and possibly put you into the rocks.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine head units and TruDesign fittings.

via Battle is joined for control of Kiteboarding

via California Kiteboarding Guide

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Your Marine Head Units Professoinals Don’t Want You to Miss This Rare and Exciting Event 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine head units analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding safety suggestions and the super moon.

Your marine head units experts know that the supermoon, or perigee full moon, on November 14, 2016, will bring the moon closer to Earth than it has been since January 26, 1948.

Slacken Dock Lines A super-moon, means super tides,( properly called, perigean spring tides ) and that means extra-high, and extra-low water could result in your boat either hanging from its lines–or. getting pulled under by them.

Prepare for Strong Currents The extra tidal range will create stronger current. This will be especially apparent when transiting coastal inlets.

Beware of Flotsam Super-high tides reach higher and farther on to shore and can cause debris like logs, discarded appliances and other items to become flotsam.

As I write this, a “supermoon” is waxing. That bigger-than-average full moon also means bigger-than-average tides. When the tide runs farther up the beach, the water snatches more driftwood and debris from the shoreline. .

A Super Moon Means Super Tides

While spending time near water or on a boat can be an enjoyable way to spend a summer day, some dangerous conditions can exist if you are not properly equipped and prepared to deal with them.

Dock Safety and Electricity

Many boat owners choose to keep their boats at a marina as opposed to mooring them. While marinas offer customers a number of amenities, such as water, cable and electricity to charge your boat’s battery or power lights and appliances, one of these perks can also lead to potential hazards. Did you know that stray electrical current from dock wiring or an electrical fault from a boat can energize the water creating an electrocution hazard?

To avoid this unpredictable and deadly hazard, do not swim or allow your passengers to swim from or near docks or boats where shore side electrical connections are provided.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/marine-toilets/fresh-head/ and see how you can find more information on marine products as well as get assistance on marine head units at Raritan Engineering.

  • Have all electrical work completed by marine electricians certified by the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC).
  • When selecting a marina to tie up to long term, ask about their electrical inspection, testing and maintenance program, including procedures to minimize the risk of ESD.
  • Promptly report to marina management evidence of chaffing cables, tripping of Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) or similar issues with the electrical system and dock pedestals.

CO is a poisonous gas that is a by-product of the gasoline/diesel engine combustion process. Carbon monoxide exposure is possible on any boat that is equipped with an engine or a generator, including outboard engines.

Other items to consider include:

  • Purchase marine-grade CO detectors and look for the UL 1524 mark.
  • CO detectors should be placed in any enclosed areas where people congregate or sleep.
  • Recognize the symptoms of CO poisoning, which may include: dizziness, drowsiness, headaches, blurred vision and nausea. Please note that individuals do not have to exhibit all of these symptoms to suffer from CO poisoning.

Swimming and Propeller Safety

Boating and swimming go hand-in-hand. But before anyone gets in the water to enjoy some summer leisure, be sure the motor on your boat is turned off and the propeller has come to a complete stop.

  • The engine should remain off when getting in and out of the boat or swimming near the boat. All passengers should be made aware of where the propeller is located.
  • Before starting the engine make sure no one is in the water near your boat.
  • If you have to approach someone in the water, do so head on. Do not approach in reverse. When you reach the person, turn off the engine before bringing them on board.

Learn more at Raritan Engineering and see how you can always find more information about marine products as well as get assistance on marine head units.

via Three Things The Supermoon Means For Boaters

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via Three of the Most Dangerous Boating Conditions

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Your Marine Head Units Experts Say That There Is Hope On the Horizon

Raritan Engineering Company your marine head units analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding some need to know information about the future of boating.

Your marine head units specialists say to raise your hand if you know of some boating companies that have faced severe difficulties, went bankrupt or restructured in the last few years.

Thanks, you can now all put your hands down.

So let’s dive in and see what the future of boating is going to look like!

I took the stock analogy to make it simpler, but I was actually referring to 2 different things: A technology law and a futurist.

1. A Technology Law

Your best marine head unit professionals know that this law is one of the most important principles in the history of technology. This observation was originally introduced in 1965 by Intel Co-founder Gordon Moore and is referred to as Moore’s Law. 

One of the most important characteristics of the Moore law is the word “double’. Double indicates that we are growing exponentially and not in a linear way. To understand the difference between linear and exponential, let’s take a simple task as an example. 

2. A Futurist

Raymond “Ray” Kurzweil is an American futurist, author, computer scientist and inventor. Your waterproof head unit analysts say that out of 147 predictions that Kurzweil made in 1990, 115 of them have turned out to be correct. Another 12 have turned out to be essentially correct (off by a year or two). 

Ray is today the director of engineering at Google. I have read a couple of his books and watched a few of his speeches. He is one of the most respected scientists on the planet. So when Kurzweil predicts something, you should really pay attention to it.

So why is the future of boating NOT what you think it will be?

The boating industry, just like any other industry, is just a reflection of the different areas of our society such as business, economy, technology & trends.

Your marine head experts know that if you study the history of technology, you will notice that human progress follows an exponential path contrary to a linear way of thinking by the majority of the public.

This is happening because the more we progress, the more we have access to resources, knowledge and technology to progress even faster.

In a bit more than 10 years time, the 20th century’s worth of progress will happen multiple times in the same year.

And all of this can be explained by to the Law of Accelerating Returns

Did you know that your smartphone today has more computing power than all the Nasa computers had when they sent the first Apollo mission to the moon in 1969?

The Challenges:

Let’s try to analyze the potential challenges that our industry is facing.

1. The trend

A few days ago, I did some research on Google trend. I wanted to see the popularity of the term boating over the last 10 years and noticed a consistent steady decline.

So why is the general population less interested about boating?

Two months ago, I was talking to an executive at one of the top boat builders in the world. I asked him who their biggest competitor was. Surprisingly, he didn’t mention another boat builder. He said that their biggest competitor was all the possibilities offered to the general public nowadays like travel, entertainment, technology, etc.

When I was young, I remember sometimes being bored, so I planned some activities with my friends like fishing or boating on our little boat.

Your Marine Head Units Professionals Discuss How the Boating Industry Needs Our Help

You can find more information as well as get assistance on TruDesign and on need to know information about the future of boating at Raritan Engineering.

Your TruDesign experts know that our new generation are not bored anymore, they are constantly connected to social media, smartphones, apps, Internet, etc.

2. The economic climate

Boat sales are ultimately correlated to the job market.

Have you ever heard of the term technological unemployment?

Several studies, like the one conducted by the Martin School of Business, predicts that 48% of current jobs will be lost in the next 15 years due to technological unemployment.

More and more corporations keep replacing jobs with machines. Here is anarticle I just read yesterday about Mc Donald’s hiring 7000 new cashiers, but they are not the typical employees, they are automated ones.

Technological unemployment is not the only reason for massive changes in our economy.

This trend is confirmed if you look at the growth of temp agencies. (See:Temp Jobs Up 57% Vs. 4% For All Others Since Aug. 09)

The American Dream is evolving.

Forget the typical life plan: school, college, job for 40 years & retirement. People change careers more often and no longer follow a structured life plan.

All those changes in the job market and economy will make it more difficult for the general public to access boating.

3. The sharing economy

If 10 years ago I asked you to stay at somebody’s house during a business trip, would you have said yes?

When you know that the average boat owner uses their boat not even 2 weeks per year, this concept makes quite a lot of sense.

The sharing economy is becoming huge in the car and travel industry. I assume that it will grow in the boating industry too.

4. More challenges

On top of this, the boating market will keep facing other challenges such as:

-Environmental activism

-Peer pressure due to increase in income inequality.

-Difficulty accessing moorage in marinas,

-Lack of interest from the newest generations (Gen Y, Millennial, etc)

Those companies share the same pattern. Peter Diamandis, founder of the X Prize foundation and Singularity University called it the 6Ds of the exponential growth:

Digitized (digitize product or service)

Deceptive (you don’t see it coming until it reaches the tipping point)

Disruptive (game changer)

Dematerialize (remove,material aspect, infrastructure)

Demonetize (remove operating cost)

Democratize (globalise via web)

The success of those companies can give us an important lesson: The rules of the game of business have changed.

You must adapt and change the way you do business. In 10 years time, 50% of the Fortune 500 companies will disappear.

If you operate the old way, you are certain to face major difficulties.

So don’t forget this important information about how to help save the future of boating. 1) Maintain the interest in boating and helping others to develop an interest;  2) go boating more often;  and 3) don’t become too technilogically advanced too quickly.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine head units, TruDesign, seacocks, and on need to know information about the future of boating.

via 5 Things You Need to Know About the Future of Boating

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 Marine Head Units Experts Show You How to Change Out Your Trailer Tongue Jack

Your Marine Head Units Specialists Recommend Changing Out Jacks With Frequent Usage

Raritan Engineering Company your marine head units analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to change out your own trailer tongue jacks.

Your marine head units experts know that I go through a heavy-duty trailer tongue jack every three to four years. Corrosion, frequent use, and a hefty boat and trailer take a toll on these jacks, so I have become adept at changing them out. 

Sometimes the jack gets broken when boaters forget to raise it after they hitch up the trailer; it drags on the pavement and becomes damaged.

Getting Started
Skill Level: 1.5/5
Time to Complete: 1 Hour

Tools and Supplies
* Fulton 2,500-pound square-tube tongue jack ($78.99, anchorexpress.com)
* Floor jack
* 6-by-6-inch wood blocks
* Jack stands
* 3-by-3-foot sheet of ½-inch plywood
* Box/open-end wrench set
* C clip pliers ($15.99, acehardware.com)
* Reciprocating saw (to cut off rusted bolts)
* Safety glasses
* Marine grease

Changing Out a Trailer Tongue Jack

1. Use a Floor Jack

If the tongue jack goes kaput while the trailer is hitched to a tow vehicle, don’t stress. Your best marine head unit professionals know that you need to park the boat and trailer in their storage location and chock the tires. Use a sufficiently rated hydraulic floor jack to lift the trailer coupler just high enough to clear the tow ball. 

2. Support the Trailer Tongue

Place a sufficiently rated, adjustable jack stand under the trailer tongue, making sure it rests square and level under the metal tube that forms the trailer tongue. Your waterproof head unit analysts know that a piece of plywood under the stand will keep it from sinking into gravel, soft soil or turf.

Your Marine Head Units Professionals Remove the Anxiety of Changing Out Your Own Jacks 

3. Remove the Broken Tongue Jack

With the trailer properly supported, you can remove the old tongue jack. Your TruDesign specialists understand that jacks that bolt to the tongue or trailer frame are fairly easy to remove with a couple of wrenches, assuming the bolts and nuts that secure the jack are not badly rusted.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on TruDesign fittings and on how to change out your trailer tongue jacks at Raritan Engineering. 

4. Attach the New Jack

To keep installation simple and quick, buy the same model tongue jack as the one you are replacing. Your marine head experts say that this way you know it will fit, is sufficiently rated to support the tongue, and won’t create clearance issues, which is important with swing jacks. 

5. Raise the Tongue

With the new tongue jack installed securely, you can now use it to raise the trailer tongue enough to remove the jack stand(s). To keep the tongue jack working for as long as possible, grease the gears at the top of the jack and lightly coat the telescoping arm with grease. 

Feet and Wheels

Telescoping tongue jacks come in a wide range of styles and weight ratings. Most jacks with ratings of 2,500 pounds or more dispense with pivoting mechanisms and wheels, which become weak points when supporting heavy tongue weights.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers on how to change out your own trailer tongue jacks. 1) Make sure to use a floor jack;  2) support the trailer tongue;  3) attach the new jack;  and 4) raise the tongue. 

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine head units, TruDesign, seacocks, and on how to change out your own trailer tongue jacks. 

via Changing Out a Trailer Tongue Jack

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