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Your Marine Hose Professionals Share-Improve Your Deep Fishing Skills Even When the Fish Aren’t Biting 

Raritan Engineering your marine hose analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding deep water fishing tips.

Your marine hose experts know that bluewater anglers are beginning to fish deep to lure billfish and tuna when the surface bite slows.

Savvy captains extend their spreads ­vertically, from the bottom up, and experiment with baits for multiple species through the entire water column. Others are looking from the top down, just a bit below the waves to find billfish and tunas when the surface bite slows. 

Going Deep, But Not Too Deep

Success at catching swordfish from deep water during daylight hours has encouraged enterprising captains to find new tuna and marlin fisheries in 1,200-plus feet deep of water.

“When you hook up on the buoy line, reel in the bottom rod before you do anything else,” Green says. If the bottom line hooks up first, he starts reeling it in immediately and uses a Hooker detachable electric motor on his 50-wide to retrieve the buoy line unattended. 

Buoy Rig and Bottom Rod

Capt. Lee Green starts his buoy rig with 1) 500 yards of 130-pound Spectra braid on the reel. 2) From there, he attaches 3 feet of 250-pound mono to a Bimini twist in the braid, and then a hollow-core Spectra loop spliced to the mono. 

Capt. Triston Hunt uses the same system as Green in the same waters, rigged on an 80 with all 80-pound braid, but he forgoes the buoy. 

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A soda bottle and rubber band are all that’s necessary to keep a bait suspended off the bottom. The real trick is getting the bait deep in the first place.

Not Quite At The Surface

If porpoises are hot after a school of baitfish, chances are tuna or billfish might be below them, attacking and driving the baits to the surface.

Sawley often finds billfish lurking behind the tuna and porpoise melee too. “Any time we are live-baiting in Panama, I put one live tuna, about 4 pounds, on top and another one on a downrigger ball. 

Planer From Cleat

Capt. George Sawley attaches 1) a short piece of 5/16 nylon rope to his transom cleat. From there, a heavy swivel connects to 2) 100 feet of aircraft cable ending in a snap swivel. 3) Another 4 feet of aircraft cable continues to a large planer. 

In-line planers have been around for decades, but a removable planer rig is catching on throughout the East Coast. laner.

Removable Planer Rig & Spooning

Capt. Chris Gornell connects his rod’s braid to 1) a few feet of 200-pound mono via a wind-on swivel. 2) Interlocking crimped loops connect that mono to 3) another piece of mono, just a bit shorter than a No. 12 planer when it’s tripped, and then comes 4) another set of interlocking crimped loops.

7) Double snap swivels attach the planer to the loops, and once it’s removed, the mono, swivels and crimps all wind through oversize rod guides.

Dredging Up Surface Bites

Dredges can attract fish to surface baits. When marking fish on the bottom machine, make tight circles and drop the dredge deep to excite sluggish fish. 

Off Virginia Beach, Capt. Randy Butler uses live tinker mackerel (Atlantic chub mackerel) to bring white marlin up from below 300 feet. 

How Long Do You Go?

Marlin can spend a quarter of their day feeding at least 150 feet below the surface, searching out optimal baitfish and oxygen levels during the day.

“With situation like that, it’s easy to see to fish a midrange. When it isn’t that clear, that’s when things get difficult. No one wants to get skunked, especially 80 miles offshore,” Boyle continues. 

Remember to purchase your marine hoses here at Raritan Engineering. We have everything you need for all of your sailing adventures.

via Fishing Deep Water for Billfish and Tuna

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