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Your Marine Ice Makers Suppliers Share Great Ways to Get Your New Crew Into Gear

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to train new crew members and how to keep them happy.

Your marine ice makers experts talk about how crew integration is one of the toughest challenges, especially in classes that allow a mix of amateurs and pros. The goal is to create a team dynamic that allows the team to develop with the right amount of pushing. It’s equally important to remember that while every amateur wants to win, keeping it fun, and racing at a high level is not easy. 

1. Commitment to the process of teaching and learning.
It is unrealistic to expect a team member with a regular job to get on a boat and do everything exactly right the first time. As we rotate team members in and out we first help the person identify the three priorities of their job for each maneuver, focusing on keeping it simple. 

2. Communication.

Follows the same theme above, but in the heat of the moment there won’t be time to communicate what’s required, so being proactive with the coms about “what’s next” and making sure that everybody is dialed in allows for smooth execution. Remember sailing is a learned sport and everybody does things slightly different. 

3. Practice and managing expectations.
Is it reasonable to expect to win if you don’t practice? No. Plain and simple. If the expectation is to win, then practice will be required. When putting together a mixed team of amateurs and pros, don’t have a lot of rotation in the intense boat handling positions. Onboard Barking Mad we sailed with the same pit girl for 10 years.  

Loyalty among the crew is prized above all say many boat owners, but loyalty among crew doesn’t come without a little effort on the part of the boat owner. 

Organizing custom gear that looks sharp and clearly identifies a crew to a boat is a great way to build crew pride. 

Check out the best marine ice maker available here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

To go along with Woodruff’s advice, here are our top 5 simple ways to keep your crew happy on and off the water:

  1. Keep them fed and watered: Of all the expenses an owner can incur with boat ownership, skimping on lunch is not the place to save a dime. Bring enough food to the boat to keep them (and yourself) going all day, including quick snacks like cookies, nuts, or chips. But you don’t have to spend $150 per regatta on gourmet sandwiches either—talk to your crew to find out what they like. 

  2. Order team gear: Nothing says team like a uniform. It’s important to have crew that gets along together and is enthusiastic about going sailing. Custom crew gear that looks sharp and clearly identifies a crew to a boat is a great way to build pride. And a proud crew is a crew that will prioritize going sailing with you. 

  3. Don’t micromanage: We all make mistakes, but nobody likes to feel like they’re under a microscope all the time. One of the most common complaints made among the crew about their boat owner and helmsman is, “He’s a great driver, if only he’d focus on that.” If your crew is new and needs some extra training, schedule a practice session. 

  4. Draw from your crew’s talents: Corinthian sailing crews come from all walks of life and bring all kinds of experience to your boat. Talk to your crew and find out what they’re good at. Do you have a graphic designer in your midst? Ask them to design a new team t-shirt. 

  5. Organize onshore events: The onshore social element is a huge part of why many sailors join Corinthian crews. Taking your crew out for a team dinner at the end of Rolex Big Boat or any other big regatta is a great way to say thanks. 

Hey crews: This isn’t a one-way street. There are a lot things you can do to let your boat owner know you appreciate the opportunity to go sailing and show them you’re an invaluable member of the team. 

At the end of the day, racing together is a huge commitment for the owner, crew, and their family and friends. Making everyone feel like a valued member of the team goes a long way to creating a successful program.

So don’t forget these reminders for training your new crew members and keeping them happy. 1) Keep them fed and watered;  2) commitment to the process of teaching and learning is needed;  and 3) good communication.

Man’s Inability To Reverse With Trailer Providing Great Entertainment To Everybody At Boat Ramp

“Left hand down, mate,” he yelled from the jetty.

“Yeah keep going. Nah go back up and straighten out, mate. Yeah, woo! Now come down slower.”

Nat Wilmott is trying to keep the peace down at the Betoota Sailing Club boat ramp – but he’s having a little bit of trouble.

The line this morning was nearing ten trailers and a sunburnt Betoota Grove financier was trying and failing spectacularly to launch his boat into Lake Yamma Yamma.

In the dry desert heat, people were getting frustrated.

But not everyone.

Those not in the line, the jetty fisherman and the like, we’re all laughing at the expense of Peter Mantits, a somewhat likable private fund manager at Macquarie Private Wealth in the French Quarter.

“Mate, you’re fucking useless!” screamed one bloke from beside the boat ramp.

“Do you want me to do it, mate? I’ve never driven a Merc before, but. Is the big silver cunt an auto or what?”

But that was when Nat, the owner-operator of the Betoota Sailing Club Tackle Shop, stepped in to help.

Peter had fallen into the trap of boat ownership without first thinking to master the art of reversing down a boat ramp – something he regrets now.

“It looks easy enough, to reverse a trailer, but it’s not,” said Peter.

“Then this nice old man, Nathan I think his name was, coached me through it and I ultimately got the thing in the water,”

“The whole episode certainly entertained these South Betoota mouthbreathers. Leering at me from the edge of the boat ramp.”

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Be sure to watch our latest video on marine ice makers below. 

via Getting New Crew Up to Speed

via FIVE SIMPLE WAYS TO KEEP YOUR CREW HAPPY AND LOYALTrain New Crew Members & Keep Them Happy

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via Man’s Inability To Reverse With Trailer Providing Great Entertainment To Everybody At Boat Ramp

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Your Marine Ice Makers Distributors Talk About How to Find Out if You’re Sailing in a Lemon

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers suppliers would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding ways to see if your boat is a lemon.

Your marine ice makers manufacturers talk about how while many of the more than 63,000 boats damaged as a result of 2017 hurricanes will be repaired and have more years of life on the water, some used boat buyers in 2018 could end up with storm-damaged lemons. The nation’s largest advocacy, services and safety group for recreational boaters, Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS), cautions used boat buyers that some boats affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are beginning to hit the market, and that getting a prepurchase survey (called a Condition and Value survey) is very important.

“It’s not that you don’t want to buy a boat that’s been repaired, but you should have full knowledge of the repairs and know they were done correctly. It’s a transparency issue that will help you negotiate a fair price,” said BoatUS Consumer Affairs Director Charles Fort. The boating group offers eight tips to help you spot a boat that might have been badly damaged in a storm:

1. Trace the history. When a car is totaled, the title is branded as salvaged or rebuilt, and buyers know up front that there was major damage at some point in the car’s history. But only a few states brand salvaged boats – Florida and Texas do not – and some states don’t require titles for boats. Anyone wishing to obscure a boat’s history need only cross state lines to avoid detection, which can be a tipoff. Look for recent gaps in the boat’s ownership, which may mean that it was at an auction or in a repair yard for a long time.

2. Look for recent hull repairs. Especially on older boats, matching gelcoat is very difficult. Mismatched colors around a repaired area are often a giveaway and may signal nothing more than filler under the gelcoat, rather than a proper fiberglass repair.

Check out the best marine ice maker available here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

3. Look for new repairs or sealant at the hull-to-deck joint. Boats that bang against a dock during a storm often suffer damage there.

4. Evidence of sinking. Check for consistent corrosion on interior hardware, such as rust on all hinges and drawer pulls. You might be able to spot an interior waterline inside a locker or an area hidden behind an interior structure.

5. Corrosion in the electrical system. Corrosion on electrical items, such as lamps, connectors and behind breaker panels might mean the boat sank recently. Does the boat have all new electronics? Why?

6. Look for evidence of major interior repairs. Fresh paint or gelcoat work on the inside of the hull and engine room is usually obvious. All new cushions and curtains may be a tipoff, too.

7. Look for fresh paint on the engine. It may be covering exterior rust as well as interior damage.

8. Ask the seller: In some states, a seller isn’t required to disclose if a boat was badly damaged unless you ask. If the seller hems and haws, keep looking. 

Boating season is very short in New England, and recreational boaters want to spend as much time on the water as possible during the summer months. 

New boats will usually include a warranty from the manufacturer. Additionally, there is usually an implied warranty included in a sale by a marine dealer who regularly sells boats or other vessels. 

The consumer should give the manufacturer or dealer prompt notice of any problems that might come up. It is recommended that the boat owner keep a written record of the dates that problems occurred, the nature of the problems, and the conversations that they have with the manufacturer or dealer about the problems. 

Although each case is different, possible remedies can include canceling the sale and seeking a refund. Consumers may also be able to recover damages for the loss of use of their boat. And, federal law provides that the manufacturer or dealer might be responsible to pay the consumer’s attorney’s fees.

So don’t forget these helpful reminders when trying to determine if your boat is a lemon. 1) Always trace the history;  2) look for fresh paint on the engine; and 3) ask the seller.

Commissioned By George Washington, “Old Ironsides” Still Sailing on 220th Birthday

The USS Constitution, or “Old Ironsides,” proved today that it is still just as seaworthy as it was when first commissioned 220 years ago. On Friday morning, the warship left Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston and sailed to Fort Independence at Castle Island where it was met by the Concord Independent Battery and 101st Field Artillery Regiment from the Massachusetts National Guard. 

Upon arrival, the USS Constitution gave a 21-gun salute, which was returned by National Guard. While passing the Coast Guard station — where it was originally built — the USS Constitution gave 17 volleys of cannon fire.

The historic ship’s trip to Fort Independence and back to Boston is part of the Unites States Navy’s 242nd birthday and the Constitution‘s 220th birthday celebrations. 

Photo: U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kathryn E. Macdonald -- The USS Constitution sets sail for first time in years in Boston's waters.

The USS Constitution is the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world. It was commissioned and named by President George Washington and set sail for the first time in 1797. Known as “Old Ironsides” for its numerous victories during the War of 1812 between the United States and the United Kingdom, the three-masted heavy frigate is a wooden warship with sides nearly two feet thick.

It was one of the first ships of the newly-created United States Navy, the successor of the Continental Navy. It was personally named by President George Washington and President John Adams, who attended its inaugural launch in 1797. 

Not only does it have all of that history, but “Old Ironsides” has a very unique distinction from other U.S. naval ships. The USS Constitution is the only remaining ship in the Navy’s fleet that has actually sunk an enemy ship. Of course, that was back in the War of 1812 — but it just adds to how impressive this two-century-old ship really is!

White oak was used for the new planks and keel, keeping with its original construction. The ship is still operated by the U.S. Navy, along with the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston, but was retired from active duty in 1855 and has been stationed at Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston since 1934. It undergoes repairs roughly every 20 years.

Visitors will also have the chance to make birthday cards for the USS Constitution, as well as make paracord bracelets for military care packages. A cannon salute will take place at 12:15 p.m. precisely to mark the first launching of “Old Ironsides” in 1797.

Choose your Raritan marine products here at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 expert in marine sanitation supplies.

via 8 Telltale Signs That the Used Boat You’re Buying Could be a Storm-Damaged Lemon

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Fiona McGlynn on her boat

Your Marine Ice Maker Professionals Share Ideas That Can Help Younger Ones to Get Into Boating

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why the youth today are not buying boats. 

Your marine ice makers distributors talk about how millennials participate in boating at similar rates to their parents, yet they’re far less likely to actually own a boat. Why? Here’s a millennial’s perspective.

Former Bain & Co. management consultant, millennial Fiona McGlynn, is on a sailing sabbatical with her husband, Robin. 

My husband, Robin, and I had often discussed this question. Having become first-time boat owners only five years before, at ages 24 and 29, we were often the only identifiable 20-somethings at our silver-haired yacht club. Over the next few years, as we immersed ourselves in life on the water, we began to meet other millennial boaters, a handful of young salts who shared our passion. 

Of course, the numbers surrounding boat ownership don’t paint the entire picture. Lost in these figures are the young boaters who use their parents’ boats, charter a boat for the day, or ride-along with friends. 

I began to wonder what had caused this shift. Why don’t more millennials own boats? Here’s what millennial boaters and industry analysts said.

Financial strain came up as the number-one challenge for the young boaters we interviewed. As Mike Provance, a 36-year-old powerboater from Coal City, Illinois, noted, “Cost is the big factor, but it’s not just the boat. It’s my truck, maintenance, fuel. It’s worth it. But it adds up.”

Keith Raycraft (36, Alberta, 16′ Thunder Bolt bass boat) has lived on the water his whole life and pursued a career as a marine-engine technician. For Keith, family comes first. “To me it’s all about making memories with my daughter. When I was a kid, I couldn’t wait for the weekend so my dad could take me to the island. I want that to be the same for her!”

Getting Greasy And Sailing Anxiety

Ashley Banes (26, Iowa, 186 Hawk Sport) grew up powerboating with her dad on a 22-foot Mach 1 on the Mississippi River. Today she and her husband own a 186 Hawk Sport that allows them to take their 2-year-old out to fish, visit sandbars, and anchor out on weekends. 

Guillaume Beaudoin (34, Quebec, C&C 24). Guillaume has a C&C 24 that he shares with a few friends in Montreal. He is also a filmmaker and is currently boat-hiking his way from Panama throughout the South Pacific, documenting community-driven ocean-conservation projects.

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Jimmy Palmer (36, New York, 311 Formula) started small, but has come to love the big go-fast boats and people associated with them. “I enjoy going to charity fun runs, poker runs, and even just throwing anchor for a good day with friends.” For the uninitiated, a poker run is a gathering of high-performance boats where each participating boat navigates a carefully charted course, stopping at five checkpoints along the route to pick up a sealed envelope containing a single playing card. 

What’s The Future Of Boating?

The appeal of boating transcends age, and 20- to 39-year-olds love boating for the same reasons their parents did. They see it as an opportunity to socialize, create family memories and adventures, and unplug from work. 

Ian Drogin (28, California, Bavaria 44), along with his brother and three friends, recently completed a six-week sailing and climbing adventure in the Aegean Sea where they tackled several limestone crags in the Greek Islands. They chartered a Bavaria 44, Hellenic Sky, which served as “base camp” for their trip. 

Mark Miele and Eden Yelland (37/34, British Columbia, 36′ Universal Europa Sedan) live aboard their 36-foot trawler, Halcyon I, part-time and regularly coastal cruise in the Pacific Northwest. In 2015, the couple left their jobs and voyaged from Victoria to La Paz, Mexico.  

How To Help Get Young People Out On The Water

Fellow Boaters

Share your knowledge. Experienced boaters make a big difference by offering advice, hands-on help, and encouragement.

Emphasize safety. A frightening experience on the water can put a newbie off boating. If you see a green boater (or anyone really) doing something that sets off alarm bells, be a friend and take the time to help, gently pointing out a safer approach.

Introduce a young person to boating. Do you have any millennial family, friends, or work colleagues with whom you enjoy spending time? Offer them an afternoon out on the water. Help them catch the boating bug. 

‘Airbnb for boats’ startup Boatsetter buys competitor Boatbound

Boatsetter will be taking select talent from Boatbound plus logistics tech and its inventory of vessels for rental. A source familiar with the transaction said the acquisition was paid for with Boatsetter stock valued in the low-millions range.

The deal makes Boatsetter the biggest peer-to-peer boat rental service in the States, and possibly the world.

To fund future acquisitions of other competitors, Boatsetter also is announcing it has added $4.75 million in funding to its December 2016 Series A round, bringing the startup to a total of $17.75 million raised.

Everyone’s a captain

Boatbound launched back in 2013, well before Boatsetter, and raised more than $5 million from 500 Startups, equity crowdfunding platforms and boat manufacturer Brunswick.

Boatbound quieted down since moving from San Francisco to Seattle 2016 to cut costs and push towards profitability. Now the nationally available service is somewhat oddly being acquired by a competitor that was only operating in one state.

The combined company hopes things will sail smoothly thanks to Boatbound’s technology for routing rental requests and Boatsetter’s focus on insurance.

Based out of Florida, Boatsetter is a three-party marketplace where private boat owners and professional charter companies, captains and renters meet. Users can pick from nearby boats, rent one with a captain attached or pick a separate captain, and quickly get out on the water at an affordable price. 

Baumgarten actually started a peer-to-peer boating insurance company called Cruzin that later merged with Boatsetter. That’s how Boatsetter provides $1 million in liability coverage, $2 million in boat damage coverage, plus additional umbrella coverage to make renters feel safe.

Experience > possession

Now the 27-person startup has a new channel to chase the estimated $50 billion yearly total addressable market for boat rentals. Boatsetter has partnered with Airbnb’s new experiences platform to let people pay to learn to sail in the San Francisco Bay, take a lesson from a pro wakeboarder in Miami or have paella cooked fresh onboard by a chef in Barcelona.

Boatsetter’s biggest challenge will be developing awareness. Most people assume they need a ton of money or boating skills to get out on the water. But the world is shifting from a materialistic culture to an experiential culture. It’s why Airbnb is blowing up.

People want to do amazing things they can capture on their camera phones and share on their social networks. They want memories. And it’s hard to top gliding over the waves with friends on your own private boat… even if it’s just for the afternoon.

So don’t forget these pointers when trying to encourage young ones to get back into boating. 1) Share your knowledge and experiences with them;  2) always be safety conscious;  and 3) take them out on an afternoon trip on the water.

Choose your Raritan marine products here with us at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via BoatUS Magazine: Why Aren’t Millennials Buying Boats?

via ‘Airbnb for boats’ startup Boatsetter buys competitor Boatbound

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Your Raritan Marine Ice Makers Specialists Talk About the Importance of Starting Your Boating Education Early

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to become a boat mechanic.

Explore the career requirements for boat mechanics. Get the facts about training options, job duties, employment growth and salary to determine if this is the right career for you. 

What Is a Boat Mechanic?

Boat mechanics maintain and repair motors, engines, propellers, pumps and other parts. General tasks may include lubricating parts, making mechanical adjustments and replacing worn or damaged parts. In this career, you will need to be able to diagnose small motor problems and explain them to customers. You may also be required to make inspections and keep records of the results along with any services performed. \

A boat mechanic is a technician who maintains and repairs inboard and outboard boat engines. Their duties include disassembling and inspecting motors, replacing defective parts and adjusting timing or fuel-air mix. Other duties may include testing and evaluating motor performance at a range of speeds. They also inspect, adjust or replace propellers, power-tilts and bilge pumps and keep records on inspections and repairs. 

The best marine ice maker can be found at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Step 1: Prepare in High School

You may begin preparing for a boat mechanic career by taking shop courses if your high school has them. Shop courses provide direct experience with small hand tools and problem solving. 

Step 2: Complete an Apprenticeship

Learning on-the-job through an apprenticeship program is one way to obtain the training you need. Boat manufacturers and labor unions may offer some apprenticeships, while others are affiliated with local community colleges or technical schools. Inboard and outboard engines, electrical systems, hydraulic systems, parts fabrication and performance tuning are among the subjects you may encounter. 

Step 3: Attend College

While an apprenticeship may prepare you for your career, many employers prefer to hire mechanics with formal training or college educations. You may obtain this experience in a certificate or associate’s degree program in small engine technology. Some schools emphasize marine technology in their programs. 

Step 4: Obtain Employment

You can apply for positions in repair shops, docks and marinas or start your own business. However, if you choose to be self-employed you will have to promote and administer your business. You’ll also need to pay for costly diagnostic equipment. 

Step 5: Consider a Second Revenue Stream

Unless you live and work in an area of the country that is temperate year-round, consider developing a second income during cold weather months when boat owners put their boats into dry dock. 

5-Boat Fire in Everett Saturday Blamed on Mechanical Problem

A mechanical problem is to blame for a fire that damaged five boats, sinking several in Everett on Saturday, officials say.

A boat carrying five people came in to moor at the Port of Everett that evening when a loud boom was heard. Flames spread quickly, and everyone on the boat jumped into the water.

One person was treated by paramedics for minor injuries.

The flames caught the mast of a nearby sailboat, and continued to spread. The dark smoke could be seen for miles.

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via 5-boat fire in Everett Saturday blamed on mechanical problem | HeraldNet.com 

via How to Become a Boat Mechanic in 5 Steps

 
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Your Marine Ice Makers Distributors Share Crucial Sailing Strategy With You Today

Raritan Engineering your marine ice makers specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to avoid having tunnel vision while competing.

Dang it! We’ve all been there. You just had to cover that one competitor, no matter which way they went. Your marine ice makers professionals further discuss how you just had to follow the local knowledge, high-tailing it to one part of the course. You just had to tack immediately off the start, to set you up for the right hand shift the weather forecast said was coming. 

Oops. It didn’t work out.

While the classic version of sailboat racing’s “tunnel vision” is focusing in on one competitor and letting a whole pack sail by, tunnel vision or hyper-focusing on one element can affect several parts of our sailboat racing game.

This complexity can be befuddling. To overcome the complexity, it is easy to oversimplify—just picking an “answer” and going with it. While often keeping it simple is sufficient, to excel, it is important to let yourself think about multiple layers of information and then make decisions. What are some of these information potential pitfalls, and how do you avoid them?

Boat setup.

Most one-design boats give sailors the ability to adjust certain elements of the way the boat is set up, to enable a range of sailing weights and styles. How tight are your shrouds? How long are your spreaders? Important questions and they don’t have the same answer for every team.

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Instead of just copying settings, seek out people who will talk with you about why they choose the settings they do, and then figure out (and test) what is right for you. Your marine ice makers manufacturers share how the same thing with sails and boat setup: different teams may want to have the vang led differently or to use a fuller main. Use what’s right for you.

Sailing conditions.

Local knowledge can be a great reference, but it’s not the right answer 100 percent of the time. While the locals may all say, “you’ve got to go left,” it’s important to keep your eyes open.

Tracking actual observations—informed by weather forecasts and local knowledge—is a better blend of information.

Tactics/strategy.

It is so easy to get sucked in on this one. Maybe you’re having a good race, and you’re actually leading one of the top guys in the fleet out to the left side of the course.

You’re now DFL and second-to-DFL. The times when you want to focus solely on one boat are incredibly few and far between and generally involve being the last race of a regatta when you’re within a few points of only one boat. Otherwise, keep your options open.

In closing.

It is difficult to find and keep the right perspective—let yourself focus, but also be open to doing things differently. Keep your eyes and ears open, and welcome new and different information. If you’re more receptive to changing situations than your competitors are, you’re sure to make smarter, faster decisions.

Choose your marine products here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Avoid That Tunnel Vision

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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Specialists Help You Take Good Care of Your Outboards

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding outboard motor painting tips.

Today, your marine hot water heaters experts know that many outboard motors are available in colors to complement the shade of your boat. Honda, Mercury and Suzuki, for example, all offer their outboards in at least two colors; Evinrude lets you add custom side plates and accents from a wide spectrum of color choices.

There are also companies that paint motors. The Miami-based Outboard Paint Shop, for instance, will paint an outboard in the 250 to 400 hp range for $1,200.

Yet there is a more economical, DIY option. The proprietary Quantum paint system from Engineered Marine Coatings (EMC2) utilizes a hybrid acrylic- polyester topcoat — a technology developed for the aerospace industry — to create an extremely durable and professional-looking finish.

Disassemble and Wash

Remove the cowl, the shroud from the midsection, and any plastic pieces or appliques that might interfere with the painting process. Remove the rubber seal around the bottom of the cowl and any other rubber grommets or gaskets that might interfere with painting exterior surfaces. 

2. Prep and Mask

Sand all surfaces to be painted with 350- to 400-grit sandpaper. Use a power sander on broad surfaces, but you might need to hand-sand hard-to-reach spots such as around the bracket and lower unit. 

3. Paint the Parts

Choose a windless day with low humidity and temperatures around 72 degrees. Protect the uncured finish from evening dew by starting early in the day or working in a covered area. Spray the dry surfaces with a medium coat of the Quantum 45-X-115 K adhesion promoter and let dry for five minutes. 

4. Reassemble and Debug

Allow the final coat to dry for 24 hours. Then remove all masking materials. Carefully reattach and reassemble all parts. If a bug or debris marred the finish while painting, wet-sand the spot with 1,500- to 2,000-grit wet sandpaper until the blemish is eliminated and the desired smoothness is achieved. 

How Many Cans?

Each Quantum 2K kit can be custom packed based on your motor size. It includes Quantum SR-002 Surface Prep/Clean, Quantum Adhesion Promoter, Quantum 2KA spray cans, rags, gloves, Scotch pad, tape and draping. 

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Professionals Equip You With the Skills You Need

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice makers at Raritan Engineering.

Painting Outboard Parts

First off, your marine ice makers know that it is best that you do not plan any outings for at least 2 weeks when undertaking this task. Initially, it will take some time, especially if you are going to try to repaint parts on the powerhead. 

Keep in mind – Aerosol paint jobs are no where near as durable as a paint job done with quality paint from a gravity fed spray gun.

With Aerosol Can Paint

Here are the steps.

Items you need:

  1. Quality primer (self etching), paint, and clear coat.
  2. clear workspace
  3. wet sandpaper – 400, 800, 1000 – 2000 (available at automotive shops)
  4. Quality Rubbing / Polishing compound (3M Perfect-it II) removes fines scratches
  5. Plenty of time and patience.

Try to use a sanding block on flat surfaces and keep the pressure even. For other areas, you can obtain paint remover from local shops but it takes time to remove. It works great for those recessed areas, but it is messy and toxic.

Raritan Engineering Company has more information on marine hot water heaters, marine ice makers, and any marine sanitation device.

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Your Marine Ice Makers Professionals Describe the Easiest Way to Use Natural Forces to Your Advantage 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to find the best angle of attack while sailing.

Your marine ice makers experts feel that there are many ways to describe the forces around sails — in fact, around any foil. One of the most straightforward ways is to split the forces into lift and drag. The lift force is, by definition, perpendicular to the apparent-wind direction; drag is parallel to it. The primary way to get more lift from a sail is to increase its angle of attack. More lift is more power.

Two ways to increase a sail’s angle of attack: trim it, or turn the bow off the wind (fall off) without easing the sails. The most important thing to know about angle of attack is the greater it is — or to put this another way, the more the sail deflects the airflow — the greater will be the lift, up to a point.

As discussed in a previous chapter the leading edge of the flat plate requires the wind to make an abrupt turn around it. Aft of the separation bubble, this abrupt turn causes the wind to change direction severely, which raises the likelihood that the boundary layer will separate from the foil. Correct camber provides a gentler turn. 

Go to http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/ice-makers/icerette-automatic-icecube-maker/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance with purchasing marine ice makers at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine ice makers specialists understand that sail trim is, however, a balancing act. Too much camber also can present problems, as the flow has difficulty staying attached to a deeply curved section. With too much camber, the likelihood is that it will separate — the nice, even curve above becomes an abrupt hairpin — and the flow will depart prematurely from the sail.

For sailors, the practical reality of this discussion is that creating lift is a cinch. All it requires is oversheeting the sails or sailing a course too low for the sail settings (both of which increase angle of attack), or sailing with sails that are too full (show too much camber) for the conditions. Unfortunately, sail trim is not so easy because its undesirable cohort — drag — offsets lift. Reducing drag, primarily because it is so difficult to see, is the tough part.

The genoa’s luff telltales are rough indicators of where you are in terms of lift and drag, at least from the perspective of angle of attack. As we now know, this is most important in terms of sail trim. 

The result is that the lift-to-drag ratio is lower. Keep increasing the angle of attack (trim the sails more or fall off the wind without easing them), and the boundary layer separates, and the total flow can stall. This can be seen in Diagram C with both telltales drooping.

For example, in smooth water and medium air, if the main is trimmed such that its lift-to-drag ratio decreases, that loss could be more than offset by a higher angle of attack from the rudder, or from the fact that more of the total force created is turned into drive force. 

Bear in mind that this discussion focuses on sailing upwind. When sailing very low downwind (high apparent-wind) angles, the name of the game is to increase drag or to stop the flow of wind. 

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information on marine ice makers and all your marine supplies needs.

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Your Marine Ice Makers Analysts Know How Important It Is to Replenish Your Energy

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to pack food for your next long sailing trip.

You probably have never asked yourself what you are going to eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner between 6th November and late January or early February 2017, but this is something the Vendée Globe skippers have to think about well in advance. They also have to take into account different considerations from us. Firstly, they need to eat more to compensate for the energy they require, which is much more than someone sitting in an office.

Freeze-dried food and ready meals

Plan for more? It’s not as simple as that. They want to have just the right amount, as they have to pay attention to the weight taken aboard, as this can seriously affect performance. Your marine parts analysts know that the weight of the food is far from being unimportant: 120 to 180 kilos of supplies (with the cleaning and personal hygiene products). When they calculate the ideal amount, the favourites work on the basis of 80 to 85 days of food, with the others taking more with them.

We should not forget that food has an influence too on our sleep. The nutritionist, Eve Tiollier, who works with Jean-Pierre Dick, explains, “alongside the bags of food offering the recommended daily intake, Jean-Pierre has an additional bag, in which he has sweet food or protein-rich food, which encourage him to sleep or on the contrary, stay awake.”

Packing for 90 days at sea is a balance between bringing the right food and bringing the right amount to keep the skippers in top form.

One bag a day

While some, like Arnaud Boissières only take aboard freeze-dried food, for many skippers, the supplies include 40 to 50% vacuum packed meals and 50-60% freeze-dried. Your marine water heaters professionals know that even if the latter has made considerable progress ove the past ten years in terms of variety and taste, they tend to be less appreciated by the skippers than the ready prepared meals.

Your Marine Ice Makers Experts Recommend Vacuum Packed or Freeze-Dried Meals for Simplicity

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice machines at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine parts corp experts understand that they do however offer a number of advantages: they don’t take up much space, they are very light and fulfil the nutritional requirements… particularly as the fresh water that is used to prepare them is supplied by the desalinator. They just have to heat it up on the ring (camping stove), stir in the sachet and it’s ready.

A few necessary goodies

Then there is another important aspect to consider with the food. The question of pleasure. This is in fact vital, as it affects the mood and therefore the performance of the skipper. Alex Thomson has already calculated with his coach, Lawrence Knott, that he may lose around twelve kilos during the race and has therefore adapted his supplied accordingly.

So don’t forget these helpful suggestions on how to pack food for your next long sailing trip. 1) Consider using freeze-dried and ready meals;  2) only eat one bag of food per day;  and 3) have the right food to make eating enjoyable to boost positive attitude.
Raritan Engineering has more information on marine ice makers, marine water heaters and the marine parts depot.

Marine Ice Makers Specialist Helps You to Get Your Boat Around Bridges 

Marine Ice Makers Specialist Explains How to Have a Pleasant Experience While Moving Around Bridges 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to move your boat around bridges. 

Your marine ice makers experts know that traveling the inland waterways can be a pleasant experience but can also bring some special challenges especially for larger boats and sailboats. Dealing with draw bridges takes some knowledge of how the system works and knowing what you are looking for, especially at night.

Nautical charts only tell you that there is a bridge and what the horizontal clearance (width) and vertical clearance (height) are, says your specialist of ice makers for boats. The vertical clearance is the one you are probably going to be most concerned with, i.e. will you fit under the bridge or will you have to open it?

You should consult your chart for the note on heights; most will show minimum vertical clearance at mean high water. That means if you are at the bridge at any time other than high tide, you should have more clearance than shown. (You’ll be able to tell exactly when you get there.)

Your marine parts depot specialists know that as you approach a bridge there are several thing that you should look for. You should check the right side of the bridge opening for the “clearance board”. Your ice maker replacement experts know that this will give you the minimum clearance, in feet, from the water level to the bridge structure.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts depot and on how to move your boat around bridges at Raritan Engineering.

Other things to look for as you approach the bridge is a blue sign with what looks like a telephone receiver with a lightning bolt through it. This will give you the radio frequencies that the bridge monitors (usually 16 and 13 or 9). It is customary, at least in most areas, to contact the bridge tender by VHF radio to request an opening, however, there is a sound signal that can be used.

Marine Ice Makers Expert Wants to Help You Do Your “Bridge Homework”

Another piece of information on the bridge will be its name. If you didn’t do your homework when you planned the trip you will need to know that name to call the bridge. It is not specific enough to just call out “bridge, bridge, bridge.”

On the bridge you will also find a white sign that shows the hours of operation and special operational procedures. You should note that some bridges open on demand year-round and some only open on demand during certain parts of the year.

You may also find regulatory signs on bridges with information on speed limits or other warnings. In many cases speed limits may change at a bridge so be careful to heed these regulatory signs. Marine ice makers for sales analyst know that the bridge structure makes a great place to set up a marine speed trap.

While waiting for the bridge to open be aware of your position and make sure that current is not carrying you into the bridge. I remember sitting behind a sailboat a few years ago waiting for the bridge to open. I guess the skipper of the sailboat took the opportunity to go below for some reason.

Once the bridge is open proceed through with caution. Many times, if there is wind or current, you may find your steering affected. Keep a close eye out and try to anticipate any corrections that need to be made.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to move your boat around bridges. 1) Dealing with draw bridges takes some knowledge of how the system works and knowing what you are looking for, especially at night;  2) Other things to look for as you approach the bridge is a blue sign with what looks like a telephone receiver with a lightning bolt through it;  and 3) While waiting for the bridge to open be aware of your position and make sure that current is not carrying you into the bridge.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine ice makers, marine parts depot, marine products, and on how to move your boats around bridges.

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Your Marine Products Specialist Shares How to Dock Your Boat

Raritan Engineering Company your marine products specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding boat docking tips.

Your marine products experts know that we can’t cover everything about boat docking in one sitting, but I think you’ll be surprised at how many of the basic principles of close quarters maneuvering are embodied in the example docking which I will be discussing shortly.

That brings up another important point. Learning to marine dock is done on the water, in our boats, not by reading about it here. Book learning and good teaching are important, (I would say crucial), and allow us to focus our minds more quickly and clearly than just by using the trial and error method.

Port-side-to — a docking dissected

For the present purposes, I’m going to assume calm marine conditions, and not factor in the effects of wind. Wind is probably the hardest thing to contend with, when docking a boat.

What’s your angle?

Your marine ice makers experts know that the first thing to notice is that this boater is coming in at an angle. This makes it much easier to aim for a particular spot, and to bring the boat in close to the dock without scraping.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice makers and on boat docking tips at Raritan Engineering.

Marine Products Professional Sees the Importance of Learning to Dock Your Boat

Coasting and the power turn

Secondly, think about what throttle setting you would use at the beginning of the approach. However, coasting is when “steerage”, the ability to steer, is at its minimum, because either i) there is no discharge current from the propeller to amplify the effect of the rudder, or ii) with inboard/outboards, most of the steering “authority” simply vanishes when the transmission is in neutral.

Keep up the momentum

The next thing the boater will do, as the dock draws nearer, is to start to turn the boat. However, this is also about the time that he or she wants to decelerate to a stop, in reverse gear. While slowing down, the vessel may be hard to steer.

Fortunately, boats in motion have momentum: once in motion, they tend to continue in motion, and once turning, they tend to continue to turn. This sometimes confounds the less skilled skipper, and yet momentum is exactly what to use when all other steering options fail, even for products purchasing experts. At just what point to turn, and how hard and for how long, I cannot say.

A walk in the dock

One final thing: it is very common for propellers to thrust asymmetrically, more on one side than the other, and in some boats the effect is often especially strong in reverse gear. The proper marine products are also needed to enjoy your traveling.

It’s because of this effect that we are discussing specifically port-side-to docking. Right hand propellers walk the stern to port, in reverse (a minority of propellers are “left hand” – for them, this whole discussion is a mirror image).

Conclusion

There is no conclusion to boat docking or in buying the right products. I have yet to hear the final word, and I’ve probably discussed and studied it more than most. Even if this port-side-to docking were all there was to know (and it’s not, it’s just the barest beginning), one could still spend a lifetime honing and refining the skills and techniques it requires.

So don’t forget these helpful points on learning how to dock your boat. 1) Know your angle;  2) know how to handle coasting and the power turn;  3) keep up the momentum;  and 4) the walk in the dock.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine products, marine ice makers, marine parts depot, and boat docking tips.

via Boat Docking – An Introduction