Your Marine Parts Depot Specialists Share the Recipe for Great Teamwork dpS2AC

Your Marine Parts Depot Professionals Encourage You to Strengthen Your Team 

Raritan Engineering your marine parts depot analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the recipe for great teamwork.

Your marine parts depot experts know that teamwork makes the dream work. There’s no “I” in team. There are countless sayings because it’s such an important aspect to many things in life…including sailing. 

Recognition for a successful sailing campaign usually goes to the skipper and/or owner of a boat. Whether at the podium, on the trophy, or in a press release, their names are front and center. 

Practice

The teamwork we leveraged on- and off-the-water made the regatta both successful and satisfying. With the support of our partner boatyard, Sailing Inc. (Cleveland, OH), and Quantum Sails, the boats were rigged and tuned for the start of practice. 

Getting Ready to Rumble

To succeed, we relied on the many talents of our immediate team, as well as the team around us. The idea of teamwork extends beyond the on-board team and involves many players throughout the class. It’s important to recognize this, as it was a strong part of our success. 

Experience Matters

We ended up third overall at KWRW, and I’m quite pleased with this result. It improved on the 2016 results, and we felt that we left it all on the race course. 

Your marine parts depot specialists encourage you to browse our marine parts selection here at Raritan Engineering Company.

Your marine parts depot professionals feel that experience matters, but good teamwork (and knowing how to build it) can make a big difference. Remember, there is already a strong support network around you, including your local sail makers, hardware suppliers, boatyards, and yacht clubs.

To sail successfully, you need a crew that works together – having a shared purpose, able to make on-the-spot decisions, good at problem solving and communicating, trusting of one another and actively participating in the goal at hand. 

Here’s the five sailing essentials for a successful team building challenge:

1.    Take the helm

Teams of 7-18 people are allocated to yachts ranging from 33-45ft. An experienced skipper leads your team; providing positive feedback, encouragement and makes sure each team member is having fun and pulling their weight.

2.   Trim the sails

After boarding the boats, teams have a safety briefing and are off to practice their race moves. On-board, co-workers quickly learn they must abandon pre-existing relationships and solve problems together – helping to build team cohesion and break down silos.

3.   Grinding the winches

Now it’s time to put your race face on. Teams jostle for position on the start line before the race begins, but once the gun goes off, it’s all hands on deck to make it happen. 

4.   Learn to tack

Sailing simulates your work environment – constant changes and ‘unknowns’ emerge and your team must adapt and deal with the situation. Sailing around the natural landmarks on Sydney Harbour, you learn to watch the water ahead, judge the wind and adjust your course to make the most of the opportunities.

5.   Safe to harbour

Everyone is encouraged to participate and no previous sailing experience is required to capably reach the finish line. As a team building activity, it uses techniques that highly competitive yacht crews use and converts them into learning experiences that your team will never forget.

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Your Marine Products Specialists Promote A More Relaxed Approach to Racing

Raritan Engineering your marine products analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to encourage everyone to become sailing lovers.

Your marine products experts know that at the end of last year, the SuperYacht Racing Association (SYRA) announced its intention to include a ‘Corinthian Spirit Class’ at its key 2017 regattas, whereby the participating yachts take a more relaxed approach to racing, with reduced competition and reduced costs. 

Your marine head gaskets professionals feel that the new class, which will focus on the social aspect of the regattas, has received a positive response so far – four yachts signed up for St Barths Bucket, including recently launched 70m Sybaris, and three for Palma’s Superyacht Cup – but SYRA believes that it will take two or three years to fully take off.

And it’s not just the owners that need the persuading; SYRA acknowledges that a lot of the time it’s the captains that have the influence over entering a regatta.

With simplified courses, no kites and no fleet starts, safety will still be paramount, but fewer people will be needed to sail the yachts and there will not be the same need to hire professionals.

“It is critical for the sailing yacht industry to attract young people and fresh blood,” she concludes. “Through charters and collaboration between the regattas, we have the opportunity to make the sailing yacht industry more inclusive and appeal to a new set of people that are willing to spend money on a new experience.”

Your Marine Products Professionals Know It Is Crucial to Attract the Youth to Sailing

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He’s right. Your marine parts depot specialists know that a personal introduction is effective. We all know neighbors, workmates, relatives, etc., that we could bring along for a day sail or a casual race. 

When the question came to me, I was less specific. People, I feel, are attracted to shore. Your marine toilets electric analysts say that they fish, they beachcomb, they picnic, and they may happen upon and watch other people sail. 

“The focus of the America’s Cup was on drama and technology, which attracts coverage and viewers but doesn’t help the non-sailing public understand any path into sailing,” says John Arndt, of SailSFBay, a Bay Area non-profit dedicated to growing participation in sailing.

Interestingly, a similar plan was hatched on the opposite side of the country. Sail Charleston, an organization also dedicated to increasing participation, planned to leverage the hugely popular Charleston Race Week to show people what sailing was all about.

“It all worked really well,” says Greg Fisher, director of College of Charleston sailing. “All the various segments of sailing were on hand to answer any questions people had about the sport. Plus, depending on where someone lived around the harbor, there was someone with a program, ready to take care of their needs and sign them up.”

Your marine head plumbing experts know that when it comes to attracting spectators, what I find particularly brilliant are offshore races that start in view of land. The adventure element of these races easily captures the imagination of the non-sailor and tends to gain mainstream media attention. Starting in view of this audience is simply smart business.

“We see our attendance is about 95 percent or more people who will have not seen sailing otherwise,” says Turner. “As to what might get them into sailing for the first time, I see that as a combination of factors: inspiration, accessibility, relative affordability, and pathway.”

Rich Jepsen, a sailing school professional and Chair of the Training Committee at US Sailing, says that growth comes from a target audience: “After years of trying to market sailing to would-be sailors, we believe there’s a narrow band of people that might be tempted to take up sailing because they saw it.”

Which brings me back to my initial contention. Our recreation has plenty of spectators. When an event is underway and viewable, it attracts more onlookers. 

Without a local organization dedicated to growing participation in sailing, I launched into Google and Yelp to compile a list of schools, rentals, and crew lists, and then wrote up some persuasive myth-busters about sailing. 

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Your Marine Parts Depot Professionals Help You Keep Your Reels In Great Shape While Casting 

Raritan Engineering your marine parts depot analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding offshore reel casting tips.

Your marine parts depot experts know that a bird’s nest this snarled requires snipping and respooling. Avoid putting a reel out of commission with these tips to prevent backlashes when casting.

Whether casting a jig or live bait, West Coast anglers are some of the best offshore conventional casters I’ve ever seen. Experienced slingers out of San Diego, Dana Point, Long Beach and other popular ports launch surface iron with a star-drag reel 100-plus yards to blitzing yellowtail. 

Because of the nature of headboat fishing off the SoCal coast, anglers have mastered distance casting to catch tunas, yellowtail, wahoo and dorado. 

Given these advantages to casting conventional gear offshore, I reached out to two West Coast experts for their insight on what to do and what not to do. 

Practice Casting

Casting a jig on a conventional setup is easier with a top shot of mono and a 9- to 10-foot rod. As soon as the lure hits the water, stop the spool to prevent nasty overruns. 

One good way to practice casting is to use an old soft-plastic swimbait on a hook. “It replicates a live bait closely in size and weight,” explains Carson, “much better than a clothespin used by old-timers to practice.”

Mono is More Forgiving

Backlashes often result when ­something affects the timing of a cast. Don’t get distracted by other anglers’ actions. Backlashes with braid are a nightmare compared with a monofilament headache.

Carson utilizes a top shot of 100 yards of mono also. “Whatever distance you regularly cast your iron, there should be enough mono to handle a long cast,” he says. 

When fishing conventional mono with lures, the mono is much more forgiving with tangles and backlashes. Still, mono does have memory and can twist up at times. 

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Carson points out that the shoulder of the spool is actually called the flange. “This is what you want to pressure when casting to prevent burning your thumb,” he explains. Your marine parts depot specialists feel that size 16 lever drags and other larger reels mostly don’t have the flange because it cuts down on a reel’s line capacity.

Backlashes often result when ­something affects the timing of a cast. Don’t get distracted by other anglers’ actions. 

Match Tackle Appropriately

Many California fishermen, especially anglers who fish their gear on multi-day trips, tend not to tweak spool tension. For example, when a lever drag is completely disengaged, they want their spool to spin as freely as the reel is capable.

Instead of tweaking tension settings, fishermen have multiple “sticks” for different classes of fish and fishing techniques. Specific rod-and-reel setups allow anglers to cast surface iron, deep jig, fight fish in the 50-pound-and-under class, and live-bait for larger tuna in the 100-pound class. 

To reach lurking gamefish such as wahoo, lightweight delicate baits, above, must be cast away from the boat. You need to flip your bait out without flipping it off the hook.

The live-bait fishery in SoCal is vitally important; Prieto fishes live bait almost 95 percent of the time. Usually sardines, anchovies or mackerel are baits of choice, depending on yearly and seasonal changes to bait prevalence. 

When casting a live baitfish, as soon as the bait hits the water, immediately put your thumb to the spool to prevent a bird’s nest. 

“Off Guadalupe Island this year, small sardines were the only bait available,” recounts Carson. “So anglers had to use 80-pound braid and a 4- to 5-foot section of 80 fluorocarbon to get a bite from a 100-plus-pound tuna.”

Common Mistakes to Watch Out For

Fishing is often shoulder to shoulder along a rail, so anglers require lightweight conventional gear with high drag pressures to prevent losing fish to friendly-fire tangles.

  • Anglers should “set and forget” their spool tensions, says Capt. Ernie Prieto. 

  • Pay attention to the whole cast. Finish the cast, says Prieto. Keep your thumb lightly on the spool the whole time. “It’s like coaster brakes on a bike,” he says. “Be ready to brake quickly.”

  • Pay attention to how much line is spooled onto the reel. Underfilled reels definitely affect distance, while overfilled are more likely to backlash. 

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Your Marine Ice Makers Analysts Know How Important It Is to Replenish Your Energy

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to pack food for your next long sailing trip.

You probably have never asked yourself what you are going to eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner between 6th November and late January or early February 2017, but this is something the Vendée Globe skippers have to think about well in advance. They also have to take into account different considerations from us. Firstly, they need to eat more to compensate for the energy they require, which is much more than someone sitting in an office.

Freeze-dried food and ready meals

Plan for more? It’s not as simple as that. They want to have just the right amount, as they have to pay attention to the weight taken aboard, as this can seriously affect performance. Your marine parts analysts know that the weight of the food is far from being unimportant: 120 to 180 kilos of supplies (with the cleaning and personal hygiene products). When they calculate the ideal amount, the favourites work on the basis of 80 to 85 days of food, with the others taking more with them.

We should not forget that food has an influence too on our sleep. The nutritionist, Eve Tiollier, who works with Jean-Pierre Dick, explains, “alongside the bags of food offering the recommended daily intake, Jean-Pierre has an additional bag, in which he has sweet food or protein-rich food, which encourage him to sleep or on the contrary, stay awake.”

Packing for 90 days at sea is a balance between bringing the right food and bringing the right amount to keep the skippers in top form.

One bag a day

While some, like Arnaud Boissières only take aboard freeze-dried food, for many skippers, the supplies include 40 to 50% vacuum packed meals and 50-60% freeze-dried. Your marine water heaters professionals know that even if the latter has made considerable progress ove the past ten years in terms of variety and taste, they tend to be less appreciated by the skippers than the ready prepared meals.

Your Marine Ice Makers Experts Recommend Vacuum Packed or Freeze-Dried Meals for Simplicity

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Your marine parts corp experts understand that they do however offer a number of advantages: they don’t take up much space, they are very light and fulfil the nutritional requirements… particularly as the fresh water that is used to prepare them is supplied by the desalinator. They just have to heat it up on the ring (camping stove), stir in the sachet and it’s ready.

A few necessary goodies

Then there is another important aspect to consider with the food. The question of pleasure. This is in fact vital, as it affects the mood and therefore the performance of the skipper. Alex Thomson has already calculated with his coach, Lawrence Knott, that he may lose around twelve kilos during the race and has therefore adapted his supplied accordingly.

So don’t forget these helpful suggestions on how to pack food for your next long sailing trip. 1) Consider using freeze-dried and ready meals;  2) only eat one bag of food per day;  and 3) have the right food to make eating enjoyable to boost positive attitude.
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Your Marine Parts Depot Specialists Understand That Maintenance Is Going to Need Some Elbow Grease

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts depot analysts would like to share with you this information regarding the secrets of dealing with pesky waterline stains.

Summer is here, and our routine maintenance chores now require some serious elbow grease. Our first impulse is to go for the super-strength acids that will take care of the hard growth as well as the stains.

Over the years, Practical Sailor has reviewed several eco-friendly products that do a good job of descaling heat exchangers and removing barnacles.

Other products like Star brite Zebra Mussel and Barnacle Remover or MaryKate On & Off deal with shell and scale well, but they contain stronger concentrations of hydrochloric acid that give off toxic fumes and are beastly to work with.

Green Cleaners

The trouble with brown-yellow waterline stains is that they’re often made up of more than one problem—a combination, for instance, of algae stain, pollen, and tannic-acid stains, plus oil stain, all in a matrix of salt and strange oxides.

Most waterline stain removers use harsh acids to banish the brown funk. If the stain isn’t too bad, try cleaning it with concentrated lemon juice first. The most eco-friendly product tested was Captain John’s Boat Brite Algae and Waterline Stain Remover, which earned a “Good” rating for appearance with just a little rubbing.

Your Marine Parts Depot Professionals Exercise Caution When Deciding to Use Acids Cleaners

Your marine parts depot experts know that acids can eat the copper right out of the bottom paint if not used carefully. This could potentially make the one or two inches above the waterline basically useless at repelling growth if you cleaned your boat in-water then loaded it for cruising.
The hull of my own boat is always well waxed and I really don’t get to much if any waterline staining. A good coat of wax, or a polymer sealer such as Awlcare, can go a long way to minimizing these brown stains.

For Gelcoat, Not Painted Hulls:

This task is easy and is also safe for gelcoated hulls. While I have personally used mild acid formulations on LPU paints such as Awlgrip or Alexseal and Acrylic urethane products such as Awlcraft 2000 or Imron I don’t suggest it, nor do the paint manufacturers.

If you must use an acid on paint please be really, really, really, really careful and rinse it off immediately after the stain disappears DO NOT LET IT DRY. Do small 3-4′ sections before moving on and rinse, rinse rinse once the stain is gone.

The Products:

To clean waterline stains I use MaryKate On & Off Gel pictured here. This is a huge improvement over the regular non-gel On & Off or basic Oxalic crystals from the hardware store. It’s also a lot cheaper and stronger than products like Davis FSR stain remover, but works similarly.
Always wear rubber gloves & eye protection! Remember this stuff is acid. I use cheap chip brushesto apply it and toss them when I am done.

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Your Marine Parts Specialists Share Amazing Tips on Efficient Sailing Teamwork

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how teamwork is needed for sailing success.

Your marine parts experts know that sailing and teamwork are crucial. Last Friday to Saturday I had the good fortune of being invited to crew on my friend Mark Hansen’s boat Sweet Lorraine (a beautiful J-145) in the 2012 Vineyard race.  The course starts near the Stamford Harbor, goes up to the Buzzard’s Bay Light Tower and then returns south of Block Island all the way to Stamford for a total length of about 238 nautical miles.  We are the rightmost boat in the picture below, taken shortly after the start.

The boat parts for less professionals know that the crew consisted of extremely experienced and successful sailors including several national/world champions in their respective boat classes.  I on the other hand have very little race experience and even my total sailing experience was a tiny fraction of that of the rest of the crew.  

First, it is tremendously useful to check your ego at the gate (the opening in the lifelines for getting aboard).  Your cheap boat parts analysts know that despite their tremendous individual accomplishments everyone did whatever was needed at the moment to help move the boat forward.  

Second, a clear division of labor makes everyone on the team effective.  On a crew everyone has a position at any one time (positions may rotate). The responsibilities for each position are well defined. 

Your Marine Parts Analysts Discuss How Good Communication is the Key

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Third, your marine parts source specialists understand that communication is the lifeblood of a team.  There is a nearly constant flow of information on the boat that enables team members to make the right local decisions. For instance at one point the wind was quite gusty and one team member announced incoming gusts letting both the helm and the sail trimmers adjust accordingly. 

Fourth, recover quickly from errors. Your marine supplies experts say that when something goes wrong on a boat, there’s no time to sulk.  Instead the problem needs to be fixed or it will generally get much worse.

Fifth, don’t get bent out of shape. Sometimes on a boat somebody will yell, especially when something is going wrong or about to go wrong and it is important to pay attention quickly. 

It was a terrific experience and I will make sure to apply some of the team lessons in working with our portfolio companies.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on why teamwork is needed for sailing success. 1) It is tremendously useful to check your ego at the gate (the opening in the lifelines for getting aboard;  2) a clear division of labor makes everyone on the team effective;  and 3) communication is the lifeblood of a team.

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Marine Parts Depot Specialist Helps You Enjoy Your First Boating Experiences

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts depot professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to endure the bumps of being a rookie sailor.

New to sailing? Let us help you master the basics with these handy sailing tipsand instructions for beginners. You can also read our sailboat buying guide and watch videos on sailing, plus compare sailboat brands to find the right one for you. 

  • Choose calm, uncrowded waters If you’re just starting to master sailing basics and learn how to sail, then one of the most important beginner sailing tips to remember is to practice in ideal conditions of light winds and low traffic. 
  • Choose a small boat to learn how to sail It’s easier to learn how to sail with fewer lines and sails.
  • Begin on a boat rigged with one sail Similar to the above, beginning on a boat that’s rigged with just one sail will make learning sailing basics easier and less complicated. 
  • Follow sailing basics for safety Your marine parts depot experts feel that there are certain sailing basics for safe boating that should go without saying, no matter what your level of expertise.

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  • Research tide, wind and weather conditions. Check the weather forecast so you can be prepared for whatever the weather might bring. Be sure to bring along adequate provisions, clothing and basic weather gear as needed.
  • Become familiar with sail control The best sailors are the ones who are able to adjust sail settings to take the best advantage of different wind and water conditions. 
  • Capsize on purpose. This may seem like one of the oddest beginner sailing tips we could suggest, but it’s better to practice how to handle a capsized sailboat within a controlled environment, as opposed to an uncontrolled one.
  • Respect the boom Some of the most common sailing injuries are a result of not being aware when the boom is about to swing. One of the most important beginner sailing tips to always remember for both passengers and crew is to be conscious and respectful of the boom at all times. 
  • Learn basic sailing terms. Before you venture out on your first trip, be sure to acquaint yourself with basic sailing terms. 
  • Practice makes perfect. Don’t try to teach yourself all the sailing basics. Invest in a good sailing course, research guides and books, and learn from friends with experience.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to avoid early mistakes as a rookie sailor. 1) Choose calm, uncrowded waters;  2) choose a small boat;  3) begin on a boat rigged with one sail;  and 4) respect the boom.

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Marine Ice Makers Specialist Helps You to Get Your Boat Around Bridges 

Marine Ice Makers Specialist Explains How to Have a Pleasant Experience While Moving Around Bridges 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to move your boat around bridges. 

Your marine ice makers experts know that traveling the inland waterways can be a pleasant experience but can also bring some special challenges especially for larger boats and sailboats. Dealing with draw bridges takes some knowledge of how the system works and knowing what you are looking for, especially at night.

Nautical charts only tell you that there is a bridge and what the horizontal clearance (width) and vertical clearance (height) are, says your specialist of ice makers for boats. The vertical clearance is the one you are probably going to be most concerned with, i.e. will you fit under the bridge or will you have to open it?

You should consult your chart for the note on heights; most will show minimum vertical clearance at mean high water. That means if you are at the bridge at any time other than high tide, you should have more clearance than shown. (You’ll be able to tell exactly when you get there.)

Your marine parts depot specialists know that as you approach a bridge there are several thing that you should look for. You should check the right side of the bridge opening for the “clearance board”. Your ice maker replacement experts know that this will give you the minimum clearance, in feet, from the water level to the bridge structure.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts depot and on how to move your boat around bridges at Raritan Engineering.

Other things to look for as you approach the bridge is a blue sign with what looks like a telephone receiver with a lightning bolt through it. This will give you the radio frequencies that the bridge monitors (usually 16 and 13 or 9). It is customary, at least in most areas, to contact the bridge tender by VHF radio to request an opening, however, there is a sound signal that can be used.

Marine Ice Makers Expert Wants to Help You Do Your “Bridge Homework”

Another piece of information on the bridge will be its name. If you didn’t do your homework when you planned the trip you will need to know that name to call the bridge. It is not specific enough to just call out “bridge, bridge, bridge.”

On the bridge you will also find a white sign that shows the hours of operation and special operational procedures. You should note that some bridges open on demand year-round and some only open on demand during certain parts of the year.

You may also find regulatory signs on bridges with information on speed limits or other warnings. In many cases speed limits may change at a bridge so be careful to heed these regulatory signs. Marine ice makers for sales analyst know that the bridge structure makes a great place to set up a marine speed trap.

While waiting for the bridge to open be aware of your position and make sure that current is not carrying you into the bridge. I remember sitting behind a sailboat a few years ago waiting for the bridge to open. I guess the skipper of the sailboat took the opportunity to go below for some reason.

Once the bridge is open proceed through with caution. Many times, if there is wind or current, you may find your steering affected. Keep a close eye out and try to anticipate any corrections that need to be made.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to move your boat around bridges. 1) Dealing with draw bridges takes some knowledge of how the system works and knowing what you are looking for, especially at night;  2) Other things to look for as you approach the bridge is a blue sign with what looks like a telephone receiver with a lightning bolt through it;  and 3) While waiting for the bridge to open be aware of your position and make sure that current is not carrying you into the bridge.

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Experts at Your Marine Parts Depot Show How to Be A Small Space Guru

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts depot specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to become a guru of moving your boat in small spaces.

Your marine parts depot says, my home dock, assigned by my friend, the local Harbour Master, has, by virtue of its difficulty, made me a better boater. I have no choice but to try to hone my skills on every docking. The ‘HM’ expresses no interest in my anxiety level (or my crew’s), nor in how many close calls we have had — as long as I actually can get in and out, then he is happy, and for the finesse which this has added to my technique I am grateful.

Step number two: the next, and probably least significant conundrum of this docking entails that first turn to port, to head more or less north, between the two rows of docked boats. The prevailing wind tends to push the boat through a much wider arc than available space permits. We overcome this using the same techniques as for the more exacting maneuvers coming up in a few moments. 

The boat must go very slowly, often coasting, more rarely even using reverse gear to take off headway. Slower speeds allow sharper turns. Start the turn early, knowing that the boat slides and skids as it yaws

Go to http://raritaneng.com/catagory-pages/replacement-parts and see how your marine parts depot specialists know that now that you have slowed down and are about to make the turn, you may need to give the boat a little shove, with the wheel hard over, using more engine power than available at just idle speed. The extra power gives you ‘steering authority’.

Step number three: Back off on the power as soon as possible, and make your way between the two rows of boats. You may have to over-rotate, sometimes by a surprising amount, to compensate for the gradually dissipating momentum which wants to make the boat skid wide through the turn, and to counteract the force of the wind, which is now more or less abeam.

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Step number four: The next corner to negotiate is just the same as the first, except worse. Quarters are getting closer, and a novice or unskilled boater may, even though he felt comfortable making the first turn, now experience unease, even though the general principles have not changed.

My boat’s stern swings to port, in reverse gear, due to ‘asymmetric propeller thrust’. A minority of boats have sterns which swing to starboard. The phenomenon goes by several names, one of which is ‘walking’.

Step number five: By this stage, I need not say that getting through a narrow gap, and then turning the boat sharply into its deep alcove, with many other boats tied up nearby, and the wind howling, is not a trivial exercise.

Three final points: (i) There is quite often a point of no return, a place beyond which there is no practical way to go into reverse gear and back out into open water. Close quarters, wind, reverse gear — these can be an impossible combination.

Conclusion — Close quarters maneuvering has no conclusion. I find this docking easier in October than I did in May, and I hope and expect to find it easier in ten years than I do now. It’s never perfect, and I’m always learning.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to move your boat in small spaces. 1) first turn to port, to head more or less north, between the two rows of docked boats;  and 2) getting through a narrow gap, and then turning the boat sharply into its deep alcove, with many other boats tied up nearby, and the wind howling, is not a trivial exercise.

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Your Marine Products Specialist Shares How to Dock Your Boat

Raritan Engineering Company your marine products specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding boat docking tips.

Your marine products experts know that we can’t cover everything about boat docking in one sitting, but I think you’ll be surprised at how many of the basic principles of close quarters maneuvering are embodied in the example docking which I will be discussing shortly.

That brings up another important point. Learning to marine dock is done on the water, in our boats, not by reading about it here. Book learning and good teaching are important, (I would say crucial), and allow us to focus our minds more quickly and clearly than just by using the trial and error method.

Port-side-to — a docking dissected

For the present purposes, I’m going to assume calm marine conditions, and not factor in the effects of wind. Wind is probably the hardest thing to contend with, when docking a boat.

What’s your angle?

Your marine ice makers experts know that the first thing to notice is that this boater is coming in at an angle. This makes it much easier to aim for a particular spot, and to bring the boat in close to the dock without scraping.

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Marine Products Professional Sees the Importance of Learning to Dock Your Boat

Coasting and the power turn

Secondly, think about what throttle setting you would use at the beginning of the approach. However, coasting is when “steerage”, the ability to steer, is at its minimum, because either i) there is no discharge current from the propeller to amplify the effect of the rudder, or ii) with inboard/outboards, most of the steering “authority” simply vanishes when the transmission is in neutral.

Keep up the momentum

The next thing the boater will do, as the dock draws nearer, is to start to turn the boat. However, this is also about the time that he or she wants to decelerate to a stop, in reverse gear. While slowing down, the vessel may be hard to steer.

Fortunately, boats in motion have momentum: once in motion, they tend to continue in motion, and once turning, they tend to continue to turn. This sometimes confounds the less skilled skipper, and yet momentum is exactly what to use when all other steering options fail, even for products purchasing experts. At just what point to turn, and how hard and for how long, I cannot say.

A walk in the dock

One final thing: it is very common for propellers to thrust asymmetrically, more on one side than the other, and in some boats the effect is often especially strong in reverse gear. The proper marine products are also needed to enjoy your traveling.

It’s because of this effect that we are discussing specifically port-side-to docking. Right hand propellers walk the stern to port, in reverse (a minority of propellers are “left hand” – for them, this whole discussion is a mirror image).

Conclusion

There is no conclusion to boat docking or in buying the right products. I have yet to hear the final word, and I’ve probably discussed and studied it more than most. Even if this port-side-to docking were all there was to know (and it’s not, it’s just the barest beginning), one could still spend a lifetime honing and refining the skills and techniques it requires.

So don’t forget these helpful points on learning how to dock your boat. 1) Know your angle;  2) know how to handle coasting and the power turn;  3) keep up the momentum;  and 4) the walk in the dock.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine products, marine ice makers, marine parts depot, and boat docking tips.

via Boat Docking – An Introduction