Your Marine Sanitation Analysts Share the Secret to Keep Your Holding Tanks From Smelling Bad

Raritan Engineering would like to share with you this week these tips on keeping your holding tanks from smelling bad.

Take a look at this photo and imagine it is your backyard. Or your patio, or balcony. Yep, those are sealed 5-gallon buckets full of iguana poop and “other” waste, ripening in the Chesapeake Bay area’s autumn sun.

Do you ever wonder whether those bright blue bottles of chemicals that claim to eliminate your head odors actually work? So did we.

Readers may remember Frye as the tester who nearly reduced the family washing machine to a bucket of bolts in his quest for a safe and effective method for washing ropes. He’s just that kind of guy.

Apart from Frye’s finding that a holding tank is an excellent reservoir for highly explosive gases, one of his more exciting discoveries was that any product’s claims of “odor-eating bacteria” should not be taken at face value. 

Your Marine Sanitation Experts Suggest You Follow These Easy Steps

Your marine parts source professionals know that on boats with toilets, builders install a holding tank to hold the sewage until the boat reaches a pump out facility. Some yachts come equipped with a “Y” valve, so that they can choose to pump out or discharge overboard while way out in the ocean. 

Most holding tanks are plastic, but there are some stainless steel tanks and even a few aluminum tanks still around.

Odor Prevention

To prevent odor, there are several things you can do.

  • Make sure your holding tank system has adequate air flow. Eliminate any low spots in vent lines that would restrict the flow of air. Aerobic bacteria (the good guys) requires oxygen to live and function.
  • Avoid the use of detergent, bleach, dish soap or other cleaners or odor-masking agents  in the holding tank.

All the suppliers of holding tank products, who we talked to, agreed that boaters should shock their tanks in the spring to clean out and de-scale the inside. “KO Kills Odors” is one that works well for this, as well as midseason use if you notice an odor building up.

 KO-Kills Odors eFCFoO

Tank Management

There are three different methods for managing the waste in your Holding Tank.

Method 1- Chemical – Most common

  • Chemical treatments are the most common and kill bacteria immediately.
  • They are very effective at controlling odors, but are not designed to dissolve waste and are the least environmentally friendly. 

Method 2 – Bioactive Treatment – 2nd most common

  •  Bioactive or biologic treatments contain live aerobic bacteria, which break down waste, reproduce and crowd out anaerobic (odor-producing) bacteria.
  • They are environmentally friendly.
  • Like enzymes, bioactive treatments emulsify paper and sewage completely.

Method 3 – Enzyme Treatment

  • Enzyme treatments accelerate the digestion of organic materials in waste and neutralize odors at the same time.
  • They work quickly to completely emulsify paper and sewage and have extremely low toxicity.

We believe in using environmentally friendly products, but there are times when we use a product that is not “environmentally friendly” but use it in an environmentally friendly way.  

Note

When using biologic or enzyme treatments to promote bacterial growth care must be taken to avoid using soaps or any products like vinegar that will upset the ph balance and destroy the bacterial action that will result in odor.

With all methods, it is recommended that biodegradable RV/Marine toilet paper (single ply, thinner and not as soft as household toilet paper) be used so that it will break down. 

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via Winning the Battle Against Holding Tank Odors

via Does Your Holding Tank Really Stink?

Your Marine Products Specialists Promote A More Relaxed Approach to Racing

Raritan Engineering your marine products analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to encourage everyone to become sailing lovers.

Your marine products experts know that at the end of last year, the SuperYacht Racing Association (SYRA) announced its intention to include a ‘Corinthian Spirit Class’ at its key 2017 regattas, whereby the participating yachts take a more relaxed approach to racing, with reduced competition and reduced costs. 

Your marine head gaskets professionals feel that the new class, which will focus on the social aspect of the regattas, has received a positive response so far – four yachts signed up for St Barths Bucket, including recently launched 70m Sybaris, and three for Palma’s Superyacht Cup – but SYRA believes that it will take two or three years to fully take off.

And it’s not just the owners that need the persuading; SYRA acknowledges that a lot of the time it’s the captains that have the influence over entering a regatta.

With simplified courses, no kites and no fleet starts, safety will still be paramount, but fewer people will be needed to sail the yachts and there will not be the same need to hire professionals.

“It is critical for the sailing yacht industry to attract young people and fresh blood,” she concludes. “Through charters and collaboration between the regattas, we have the opportunity to make the sailing yacht industry more inclusive and appeal to a new set of people that are willing to spend money on a new experience.”

Your Marine Products Professionals Know It Is Crucial to Attract the Youth to Sailing

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts depot at Raritan Engineering.

He’s right. Your marine parts depot specialists know that a personal introduction is effective. We all know neighbors, workmates, relatives, etc., that we could bring along for a day sail or a casual race. 

When the question came to me, I was less specific. People, I feel, are attracted to shore. Your marine toilets electric analysts say that they fish, they beachcomb, they picnic, and they may happen upon and watch other people sail. 

“The focus of the America’s Cup was on drama and technology, which attracts coverage and viewers but doesn’t help the non-sailing public understand any path into sailing,” says John Arndt, of SailSFBay, a Bay Area non-profit dedicated to growing participation in sailing.

Interestingly, a similar plan was hatched on the opposite side of the country. Sail Charleston, an organization also dedicated to increasing participation, planned to leverage the hugely popular Charleston Race Week to show people what sailing was all about.

“It all worked really well,” says Greg Fisher, director of College of Charleston sailing. “All the various segments of sailing were on hand to answer any questions people had about the sport. Plus, depending on where someone lived around the harbor, there was someone with a program, ready to take care of their needs and sign them up.”

Your marine head plumbing experts know that when it comes to attracting spectators, what I find particularly brilliant are offshore races that start in view of land. The adventure element of these races easily captures the imagination of the non-sailor and tends to gain mainstream media attention. Starting in view of this audience is simply smart business.

“We see our attendance is about 95 percent or more people who will have not seen sailing otherwise,” says Turner. “As to what might get them into sailing for the first time, I see that as a combination of factors: inspiration, accessibility, relative affordability, and pathway.”

Rich Jepsen, a sailing school professional and Chair of the Training Committee at US Sailing, says that growth comes from a target audience: “After years of trying to market sailing to would-be sailors, we believe there’s a narrow band of people that might be tempted to take up sailing because they saw it.”

Which brings me back to my initial contention. Our recreation has plenty of spectators. When an event is underway and viewable, it attracts more onlookers. 

Without a local organization dedicated to growing participation in sailing, I launched into Google and Yelp to compile a list of schools, rentals, and crew lists, and then wrote up some persuasive myth-busters about sailing. 

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via Dialing Down Volume to Grow the Sport

via How Do We Grow the Sport of Sailing?

Your Marine Parts Source Analysts Help You Strengthen Your Wifi Access 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts source specialists are excited to share with you this week this spectacular information about how to take care of your wifi needs while sailing.

As most sailors have found, trying to use a typical laptop WiFi card to connect to a marina or yacht club hotspot doesn’t cut it. A more acceptable compromise is an amplified WiFi card which can theoretically boost transmission power to about 1,000 milliwatts.

Mini’s setup uses the same amplifier as the Wirie but it costs less compared to the Wirie’s higher pricetag. The installation takes about an hour and requires no electrical know-how. Instead of using a watertight box as the Wirie does, Mini uses PVC fittings from Home Depot, which he claims are completely watertight. 

INSTALLATION DETAILS

Amplified WiFi Card: The card is an Alfa AWUS036H; Mini’s is rated at 500 milliwatts, but the latest version is rated by the manufacturer at 1,000 milliwatts.

Antenna: The antenna is a 2.4 gHz, 24-inch, 8.5-decibel vertical antenna  with an N-type female connector at the bottom. 

Your Marine Parts Source Experts Have the Recipe for Your Do-It-Yourself Antenna Fix

Software: Your marine parts source professionals know that you will need to install the driver and interface for the chipset in the new Alfa card. 

Housing: The PVC container assembly comprises a 3-inch diameter pipe that is 6 inches long, with a matching domed cap and a screw-on base.

Accessories: Mini used a 10-inch-long coaxial pigtail (RP-SMA male to N male) to connect the card to the antenna. To connect the Alfa Wi-Fi booster to his computer, he used a 2-foot-long USB male mini-B to male mini-A adapter cable to start the cable run.  

INSTALLATION DETAILS

1. Install the driver and utility to the computer.

2. Using the USB cables, coaxial pigtail and required adapter, assemble the antenna components for testing. 

3. To build the PVC housing, first drill a hole in the domed PVC cap to take the base of the antenna. 

4. Cut a hole in the screw-on base-cap to let the USB cable exit the bottom. This hole should not be in the center of the base-cap, as it might interfere with any threaded center-mounting arrangement.

5. To secure the card inside the PVC pipe, cut a 2-inch-long piece of scrap wood so that it fits snugly inside the pipe, then glue it in place. Mini glued the card to the wood insert, but one could easily use adhesive Velcro tape, which would allow you to more easily remove the WiFi adapter, if needed.

6. Cut a hole in the base to hold a mounting clamp if you intend to mount the antenna on deck.

7. Drill a couple of quarter-inch holes in the cap to make it easy to disassemble using a long screwdriver for leverage. Fill the holes with earplugs to keep water out.

8. Put everything together. The antenna will stick out the top, the USB cable will come out of the bottom, and the antenna mounting clamp will be on the bottom-center—and all will be waterproof.

9. If you want to be able to hang the antenna in the rigging for greater range in some places, you can screw on a small ring-eye.

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via Build Your Own Long-range WiFi Antenna 

Your Marine Parts Source Specialists Know That Sailing Season Is Upon Us

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts source analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the question, “is sailing really that difficult?”

Your marine products for sale specialists know that fall appears to finally be upon us. As I write, the temperature is not in the 80s, the sky is overcast and the trees are shedding their leaves, finally. I am still buzzing after sailing the foiling cats at the Red Bull Foiling Generation ‘go for a sail’ event last Monday.

Halloween, cleaning up after Halloween, Veterans Day…really, go and check out Warrior Sailing. Think you’re having a bad hair day? Honestly, this is a fantastic, real way to really thank these men and women for their service.

Then there is Thanksgiving, shopping, Christmas present wrapping, New Year’s Eve and related hangover recovery, skiing, and maybe Key West for some. It’s going to be a pretty normal kind of life for those of us who are not Warrior Sailors or asthmatics, right?

On November 6, 2016, 29 sailors from 10 countries get underway in what really is the world’s toughest sailing race. It is a race that makes all others pale in comparison, and pretty much any other ‘sporting’ activity too.

Since a lot of racing experts are looking for marine supplies near me those professionals say that in the U.S., for those who recognize the name, the Vendée likely is regarded as one of those loony French, anti-social, single-handed races. Well, two out of three.

The fact that the Vendée is hard, requires a special kind of mentality and approach, has many technical requirements and related difficulties that need to be managed, sometimes alone in very difficult circumstances, needs a team and leaders to make it all happen…well, these are the attributes companies say they want in their employees.

Your Marine Parts Source Professionals Caution That It’s Not As Easy As It Looks

You can find more information on marine products as well as get assistance on marine heads at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine heads experts know that a native of Boston, MA, Rich Wilson is unique in this edition due to his age, his physical condition, and his goal. This is his second Vendée Globe to be sure, but there are three other entrants embarking on their second and five skippers doing their fourth.

Sailing isn’t simple. Done well, it might be among the most complex pastimes we might select. True, almost anyone can learn to tail a winch, raise a mainsail, or tie a figure-8.

I sail with teachers. My wife (who manages the pit), our headsail trimmer, and one of our bow crew are all teachers.

Teachers make great sailing mates, partly because they have summers off. More importantly, they understand how people learn. We often apply best classroom practices to sailing as a team, so that every member can learn and achieve. We have pre-sail goal-setting chats.

The point is that it is possible to offer an ideal environment for developing confidence, building skills and then mastering sailing’s complexities, but it requires more than rote steps.

I like to describe it as mentor-led immersion; like learning a language by moving to the country of origin, but having someone who speaks your tongue available in a pinch. Your marine supplies San Diego understand that it takes work to make and keep something like this going, but it’s worth it for everyone.

As a rule, sailing is dynamic; every moment potentially different from the previous or the next. It’s an exercise in free-form adaptability, best guesses and finesse informed by past experience and better judgement.

Many sailing programs have gone wildly overboard in terms of structure. Youth sailing is often about repetition and routine, since the only long range vision is an olympic berth where lottery probabilities apply.

Think these ideas might be impossible? Can’t insure them? Can’t convince the board? Can’t find the volunteers? Not the way you’ve always done it? Not sanctioned? Sure, change is hard, and that’s the point. Sailing is hard too, but it’s within reach and it’s always worth it.

The right thing to do is often the hard thing to do.

Raritan Engineering has more information as your marine parts source regarding marine heads.

via How Tough Can Sailing Be?

via Sailing Is Hard. That’s Why It’s Good

Image result for Gelcoat repair

Your Marine Parts Source Analysts Help You to Make Your Boat Look Amazing

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week some powerful tips on how to make and keep your sail boat looking amazing.

Your marine parts source specialists know that as good a job as the Badger does, however, setting up and cleaning the tool is a multi-step process. In the interest of simplicity, we have also outlined an alternative method of repairing gelcoat—applying gelcoat with a brush instead of with a spray gun.

The advantage of “painting” gelcoat on is that you save the $17 price of an airbrush and the hassle of setup and cleanup. However, you can’t finish the job in one sitting; the gelcoat must be brushed on in several coats to achieve good coverage.

Fortunately there is an even better solution, the Preval Sprayer. The Preval combines the best of the Badger and the paint brush. It’s quick to set up and clean, and provides adequate coverage in a single application.

The Preval Sprayer is not a new product. It has been used for many years by boatbuilders and boatyards to do spot repairs to gelcoat. It’s not economical even for a yard to do minor cosmetic repairs with a big, compressor-driven industrial spray gun.

Your Marine Parts Source Experts Explain Which Tools Are Needed On These Projects

Instead, use an unwaxed paper cup. Your marine parts source professionals say that you can just stick the stem of the propellant can in a corner of the cup as you spray. You must be careful to keep the stem immersed in gelcoat, or the sprayer will sputter and splatter.

The Preval will spray 16 ounces of liquid with a full can of propellant. This means you can re-use it for several gelcoat repairs before you toss it.

However, you must carefully clean it after every use. Cleaning is a quick three-step procedure: First, stick the stem in acetone and spray for a few seconds.

As a final precaution, stick the stem back in acetone and spray it through the system for a few more seconds. When buying gelcoat, it’s best to check first with the builder of your boat, because he is most likely to have colors that match, or give you the information you need to make a match.

As with any gelcoat job, the surface must be perfectly faired with auto body and/or lacquer putty, or fairing compound before spraying. The gelcoat must be thinned slightly with reducer to spray evenly (although acetone is often recommended from thinning, it will cause the finish to more quickly lose its brightness, color, and gloss).

So don’t forget these helpful reminders on how to keep your boat looking amazing. 1) Be open-minded about applying gelcoat with a brush and not an air gun;  2) the gelcoat must be brushed on in several coats to look its best;  and 3) remember that the surface must be perfectly faired with lacquer or auto body putty before spraying.

Learn more at Raritan Engineering about how we are always the best marine parts source.

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marine parts source-Jibing
Your Marine Parts Source Analysts Know the Importance of Perfecting Your Tack

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts source professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to become a jibing master.

Your marine parts source experts know that as with tacks, there are three key elements: steering, trim, and weight.

After you’ve perfected your tack, it’s time for the next act, we need to master the jibe for both symmetrical (I know there are still some of you out there) and asymmetrical spinnakers. Fortunately, most of the principles are the same.

Steering

As you would expect, the pressure is on the helms person. There’s often a lot of focus on the efforts at the front of the boat, but if a jibe goes bad, the fault usually lies further aft. 

When steering, the first issue is timing and preparation. If the team isn’t ready, or the spinnaker isn’t full and flying well with the boat at the appropriate angle, the odds are good that things will go wrong. The same “3, 2, 1, turning the boat” countdown will help with coordination.

A smooth, consistent rate of turn works best, but don’t turn any faster than the spinnaker is rotated (more on this in a moment). The helms person should use the spinnaker as a visual cue. If the bow gets ahead of the spinnaker as it is eased out, it will collapse and blow back through the foretriangle. 

As with a tack, finding the right angle to build speed out of a jibe is the trick. In light-to-moderate air, as long as the spinnaker is full, you can head up to an angle a little higher than the angle you went into the jibe.

Trim

Another parallel to the tack is the release. The key is not getting the new sheet in; it’s all about the ease. The sail must be full and flying regardless of spinnaker type. For symmetricals, it’s usually easiest to have a single trimmer take both sheets, easing one side while trimming the other as the boat turns. 

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Your marine parts source specialists know that for asymmetricals, ease as the boat bears away, letting the clew float away from the boat until it is at the headstay; release completely, following the sheet to make sure it runs. 

What about the mainsail?

For symmetrical jibes, wait until the sail unloads as you past dead downwind; grab all the sheet parts (on a smaller boat) and throw the sail across. On a big boat, you’ll need some fast hands pulling in the slack on a winch at the critical unloading moment. 

For asymmetrical jibes, treat the mainsail the same way, but with one modification. In light-to-moderate conditions, you can delay the boom crossing the boat – hold it on the wrong side until the spinnaker fills on the new side, then release.

Weight

In light air, hold the weight forward and leeward, and move smoothly to the new side to create heel out of the jibe. The only crew who might have to move are the trimmers. Remember, movement kills speed, so keep it light, then freeze. In medium air, roll the boat a bit. 

Once again, there are a lot of moving pieces if you want to master the jibe, but there are boat lengths to be gained. Good techniques are a lot more reliable than hooking onto the inside of a perfect 15-degree header, and good techniques can be learned and developed, which is nice.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers on how to become a jibing master. 1) When steering, the first issue is timing and preparation;  2) in regards to the trim, the key is not getting the new sheet in; it’s all about the ease;  and 3) in light air, hold the weight forward and leeward, and move smoothly to the new side to create heel out of the jibe.

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via How to Master the Jibe

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Marine Supplies-Water Pumps

Your Marine Supplies Specialists Share the Best Replacement Schedule for Optimum Performance 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine supplies professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the best water pump impeller servicing tips.

Your marine supplies experts know that most engine makers recommend changing impellers every two years — sooner if operated in sandy or silty water. “If your engine runs warm at idle or slow speed, and then it runs cooler at higher speed, that’s a sign that the impeller needs to be changed,” says Jeff Fay.

1. Drain the gear lube. Your boat supplies and accessories analysts know that a few shavings on the magnetic plugs are normal, but milkiness, which indicates water in the gear lube, isn’t. Remove the rear anode to access the aft-most bolt. Remove two more bolts just ahead of the anode. 

2. Remove the copper water tube and its white plastic guide, as well as the drive-shaft O-ring, doughnut-shaped “slinger,” and impeller housing. Carefully pry the impeller from the housing. Don’t lose the key. 

3. Clean all parts, then install the new gaskets, wear plate and the round, orange oil-passage seal. A dab of grease holds the key while installing the impeller, and a bit of liquid soap on the impeller lubricates it when first starting the engine. 

4. Reinstall the impeller housing, drive-shaft slinger seal and drive-shaft O-ring. Your boat covers professionals suggest that you insert the copper water-passage tube into the upper drive half and its white guide tube into the impeller housing.

“You’re doing a lot at once to get the two halves back together,” Cosselman warns. “Look through the exhaust cavity to see the water tube going into the white guide sleeve. Twist the drive shaft to align the splines as it goes into the upper gear set. 

5. Separate the upper and lower drive halves a bit to get the two forward nuts onto their studs. Reinstall the remaining front nut and three rear bolts. Reinstall the drain and vent plugs. While pressure-testing, rotate the drive shaft to test seals.

Quick Tip: The rear-most bolt hidden by the anode often corrodes, so an Allen key will no longer turn it. If so, either drill it out or slide a hacksaw blade between the upper and lower halves of the drive to cut it.

Your Marine Supplies Analysts Want You to Avoid Having Your Boat Parts Fail You When You Need Them Most

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts source and on the best water pump impeller servicing tips at Raritan Engineering.

Flexible impeller pumps

Your marine parts source specialists understand that inboard and sterndrive engines usually include a raw water pump of the flexible impeller type. Your marine supply company experts say that flexible impeller pumps are common in shower drain sump pumps, some bilge pumps, wakeboard ballast pump systems, oil changing systems and lots of other applications.

When they fail

Flexible impeller pumps work best when run regularly. If your pump sits for months with the impeller in one position with the blades on one side bent, it may “take a set” and may blow a circuit breaker on startup (if it’s electrically driven). The impeller may also stick to the housing and come apart when the pump starts. 

Of course, you should check the wet exhaust on your transom for the proper flow of cooling water each time you start the engine. You should check the impeller’s condition during Spring Commissioning and every 200 hours of operation. 

Neoprene, nitrile or polyurethane

Use neoprene impellers for engine cooling, and for fresh and salt water transfer duties. Neoprene is suitable only for pumps where small amounts of oil or diesel fuel are present.

Use nitrile impellers for bilge pumping and for transfer duties where water is heavily contaminated, for example by oil or diesel. For transferring diesel fuel, use a sliding vane pump like the Jabsco Vane Puppy or Groco Flo-Master. 

Replacement in raw water pumps

Replacement is relatively simple. Close thru-hull (raw water pump applications). Remove the three to six end cover screws and take off the cover and gasket. Take the old impeller out by gripping the hub of the impeller using channel lock or needle-nosed pliers. 

Lightly lubricate the inside of the impeller housing with Vaseline to reduce the friction of the first dry startup. Use a heavy rubber band or loop of light line to collapse the impeller’s vanes, insert it, and pull the loop our with your pliers. 

Your pump may need additional service, particularly the seals, bearings, wear plates or clutch. Nigel Calder’s excellent book,Boat Owner’s Mechanical and Electrical Manual, covers detailed rebuilding. 

So don’t forget these helpful tips when servicing your water pump impellers. 1) Drain the gear lube;  2) remove all necessary parts;  3) clean all the parts;  4) reinstall the impeller housing, drive-shaft slinger seal and drive-shaft O-ring;  and 5) separate the upper and lower drive halves a bit to get the two forward nuts onto their studs.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine supplies, marine parts source, marine heads, and on the best water pump impeller servicing tips.

via How to Service a Sterndrive Water Pump Impeller

via Impeller Replacement 101

Your Marine Parts Specialists Share Amazing Tips on Efficient Sailing Teamwork

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how teamwork is needed for sailing success.

Your marine parts experts know that sailing and teamwork are crucial. Last Friday to Saturday I had the good fortune of being invited to crew on my friend Mark Hansen’s boat Sweet Lorraine (a beautiful J-145) in the 2012 Vineyard race.  The course starts near the Stamford Harbor, goes up to the Buzzard’s Bay Light Tower and then returns south of Block Island all the way to Stamford for a total length of about 238 nautical miles.  We are the rightmost boat in the picture below, taken shortly after the start.

The boat parts for less professionals know that the crew consisted of extremely experienced and successful sailors including several national/world champions in their respective boat classes.  I on the other hand have very little race experience and even my total sailing experience was a tiny fraction of that of the rest of the crew.  

First, it is tremendously useful to check your ego at the gate (the opening in the lifelines for getting aboard).  Your cheap boat parts analysts know that despite their tremendous individual accomplishments everyone did whatever was needed at the moment to help move the boat forward.  

Second, a clear division of labor makes everyone on the team effective.  On a crew everyone has a position at any one time (positions may rotate). The responsibilities for each position are well defined. 

Your Marine Parts Analysts Discuss How Good Communication is the Key

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine parts source and on why teamwork is needed for sailing success at Raritan Engineering.

Third, your marine parts source specialists understand that communication is the lifeblood of a team.  There is a nearly constant flow of information on the boat that enables team members to make the right local decisions. For instance at one point the wind was quite gusty and one team member announced incoming gusts letting both the helm and the sail trimmers adjust accordingly. 

Fourth, recover quickly from errors. Your marine supplies experts say that when something goes wrong on a boat, there’s no time to sulk.  Instead the problem needs to be fixed or it will generally get much worse.

Fifth, don’t get bent out of shape. Sometimes on a boat somebody will yell, especially when something is going wrong or about to go wrong and it is important to pay attention quickly. 

It was a terrific experience and I will make sure to apply some of the team lessons in working with our portfolio companies.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on why teamwork is needed for sailing success. 1) It is tremendously useful to check your ego at the gate (the opening in the lifelines for getting aboard;  2) a clear division of labor makes everyone on the team effective;  and 3) communication is the lifeblood of a team.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine parts, marine parts source, marine parts depot, and on why teamwork is needed for sailing success. 

via Sailing and Team Work

Your Marine Parts Source Professionals Know How Important It Is to Remove the Confusion

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image credit: outsideimages.com

Raritan Engineering Company your marine parts source analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to decipher multiple boat rules

Your marine parts source experts know that when two boats meet, the rules are often clear, but when more boats pile up, things can get confusing.

Let’s consider what, at first glance, seems to be a very simple three-boat incident. The diagram shows Luke, Molly and Willie on starboard tack on a downwind leg. The boats are lightweight one-design boats, each sailing the course that maximizes its Velocity Made Good to the leeward mark. 

We’ll examine how the rules apply at each position shown. Because the boats are on the same tack, either Rule 11 or Rule 12 always applies to each of the three possible pairs of boats (Luke-Molly, Luke-Willie and Molly-Willie). The boats don’t change course during the incident, so Rule 16.1 does not apply. 

At Position 1, Molly and Luke are overlapped, and each of them is clear astern of Willie. So, Rule 12 gives Willie right of way over Molly and Luke, and Rule 11 gives Luke right of way over Molly. 

At that moment, several changes occur: (1) When Molly becomes overlapped with Willie, she is between Luke and Willie and overlapped with each of them. Thus, according to the definition of “overlap,” Luke also becomes overlapped with Willie.

(2) Willie is then a windward boat to both Molly and Luke, so Rule 11 is “on,” Rule 12 is “off,” and Willie must now keep clear of both Molly and Luke.

(3) When Molly and Luke acquired right of way over Willie, Rule 15 applied. It applied “initially” — i.e., for only a few seconds, during which time it required both of them to give Willie room to fulfill his new obligation to keep clear of them.

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(4) The distances between Willie and Molly and between Willie and Luke are both less than two hull lengths, and therefore Rule 17 applies to both Molly and Luke with respect to Willie.

(5) Finally, because it’s now Luke who has right of way over both Molly and Willie, Willie is no longer an obstruction, and Luke has become an obstruction to Molly and Willie. 

OK, moving on again, consider Position 3. The relative positions of the boats have not changed. However, Luke has just reached the jibe line to the leeward mark. If Luke continues on starboard tack across the jibe line, he will break Rule 17. 

One might ask whether Molly also broke Rule 17, about a length before Position 3, when she sailed across the jibe line. The answer is no. The reasoning is as follows: At that time, Rule 17, as it applied to Molly and Willie, required Molly not to sail above her proper course, which was the course she would sail to finish as soon as possible in the absence of Willie.

Finally, let’s change things a bit and assume Luke didn’t become overlapped to leeward of Molly while within two lengths of her. If that had happened, Rule 17 would not have applied to Luke and Molly at any time during the incident. Would that change how the rules apply at Positions 2 and 3? Again, the answer is no. 

The complexity of four- and five-boat incidents shows why it is very important for race committees to set starting lines and courses so the chances of boats concentrating in a small patch of water are minimized in the first place.

So don’t forget these helpful tips in how to decipher multiple boat rules. 1) At Position 1, Rule 12 gives Willie right of way over Molly and Luke, and Rule 11 gives Luke right of way over Molly;  2) Willie is then a windward boat to both Molly and Luke, so Rule 11 is “on,” Rule 12 is “off,” and Willie must now keep clear of both Molly and Luke; and 3) When Molly and Luke acquired right of way over Willie, Rule 15 applied. It applied “initially” — i.e., for only a few seconds, during which time it required both of them to give Willie room to fulfill his new obligation to keep clear of them.

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via Clarifying Rules with Multiple Boats