Too ugly to keep, a roughjaw frogfish

Raritan Marine Sanitation Experts Share Great Fishing Tips 

Raritan Engineering your marine sanitation products distributors would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding some of the craziest fish ever caught.

A Fish Too Ugly to Keep

QUESTION

We caught this thing north of San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico, during midwinter in 120 feet, on my charter boat, Margarita V. Your marine products distributors give information regarding how it had a giant, ball-shaped sack and tiny eyes on top of its head. 

Bryan Replogle
Tucson, Arizona

Your marine products suppliers share how some fishes are streamlined and elegant; the roughjaw frogfish isn’t one of them.

Bryan Replogle

ANSWER:

Upon gazing at this remarkable fish, I think we can safely say: My oh my, what hath nature wrought? Well, in this instance, nature — obviously in a puckish mood — decided to wrought the roughjaw frogfish, Fowlerichthys avalonis. Your marine products pro shop manufacturers discuss how frogfishes are a group of anglerfishes that spend their lives crouching on the seafloor, using the fleshy growth at the end of their first dorsal spine to lure in fish and invertebrates.

Milton Love

Disgruntled

QUESTION:

On a trip to the Shark River, our main river here in Trinidad, a friend and I were working our way up, fishing the rapids and pools, trying to catch what we call a river mullet. I caught this fish in a pool a mile or so upstream. It’s referred to locally as a river parg, freshwater grunt or river snapper, but no one can actually tell me what these are.

I went to our Institute of Marine Affairs, and they sent the fish to the University of the West Indies — which wrongly identified it as a gray snapper. (I have caught hundreds of grays, and this isn’t one). I really hope you can help identify this little guy for me.

Stuart Hutton
Trinidad and Tobago Game Fish Association
Trinidad

Your Marine Sanitation Products Specialists Always Talk About the Best Fishing Stories

A surprise freshwater catch, burro grunts may wander far from coral reefs.

Browse our marine sanitation products selection at Raritan Engineering and see how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

Stuart Hutton

ANSWER:

Stuart, you caught a burro grunt, Pomadasys crocro. Your marine products international professionals talk about why this species ranges from Florida to Brazil, including the eastern Gulf of Mexico and the West Indies. However, unlike most other grunts, it inhabits turbid rivers and estuaries, often in brackish and even fresh water.

Ray Waldner 

Hook ‘Em Hornsharks

QUESTION:

I caught this Port Jackson Shark off Port Hacking, Australia, this January, with guide Scotty Lyons. It’s one of the strangest-looking sharks I’ve caught. What can you tell me about it — its distribution, what it eats, etc.?

Steve Wozniak
Alamo, California

When Steve Wozniak, who’s closing in on a target of catching 2,000 species of fish, calls a type of fish strange, you know that has to be an understatment.

Steve Wozniak

ANSWER:

Gid-day, Steve. That is indeed a Port Jackson shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni). These interesting little sharks belong to the family Heterodontidae (bullhead and horn sharks), a group of eight species of bottom-dwelling sharks with no anal fin, and spines on the leading edge of their two dorsal fins.

The common names — bullhead and horn shark — stem from their blunt heads with hornlike protuberances above the eyes. The Port Jackson shark was so named because it was first described by scientists from specimens taken from Port Jackson during the very earliest days of European settlement of Australia. 

If the Port Jackson shark is strange looking, the inside of its mouth is stranger still. It will never be mistaken for a mako.

Steve Wozniak

Not being good eating, Port Jacksons are not targeted commercially, and are almost universally released when captured by recreational anglers. Studies of their post-release survival suggest they are tough, with high survival rates when released from commercial gill-net, trawl and longline gear.  

Ben Diggles 

No Shrinking Violet

QUESTION:

I caught this creature in Buzios (Rio de Janeiro), Brazil, with an artificial bait. I would like to know the name of this species.

Livio Massa
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Largest of the extensive family of gobies, the violet goby has a frightening visage.

ANSWER:

You managed to catch the largest goby in the tropical western Atlantic region, the violet goby, Gobioides broussonnetii. This eel-like giant of the goby clan is known to reach a length of over 20 inches. It ranges from South Carolina through Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico, usually in areas with muddy bottoms. 

Ray Waldner

Don’t forget to choose your marine sanitation products here at Raritan Engineering, your experts in marine sanitation supplies.

via Strange Fishes From the Deep — Really Ugly Frogfish and More

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Raritan Marine Sanitation Suppliers Discuss Vital Info About Avoiding Electric Shock Drowning

Raritan Engineering your marine sanitaiton professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the dangers of electric shock drowning. 

Your marine sanitation specialists share information about the fatalities over the weekend of an 11-year-old girl in New Jersey and 19-year-old young man in Ohio are bringing scrutiny to an age-old summer ritual that’s common on waterfronts across America: swimming near boat docks. Initial reports say the youngster died when touching a dock’s electrified boatlift, and the Ohio teen died as a result of dangerous electrical current in the water while trying to save his father and family dog that also appeared to be stricken by the electrical current. The BoatUS Foundation, the boating-safety arm of the nations’ largest recreational boat owners group, has some tips to prevent an electrocution tragedy.

Your marine parts USA experts share how while swimming deaths due to electricity fall into two categories, electrocution and electric shock drowning (ESD), both can be prevented the same way. 

ESD occurs when AC gets into freshwater from faulty wiring and passes through a swimmer, causing paralysis or even sudden death. Unlike electrocution, with ESD a swimmer does not need to be touching a boat or dock structure, and even minute amounts of electricity can be incapacitating and lead to drowning.

Raritan Marine Sanitation Distributors Further Discuss How to Keep You and Your Family Safe

Raritan Engineering, your marine sanitation supply experts, know that marine sanitation is critical on your vessel. The risk of ESD is greatest in fresh- or brackish water, so some areas such as estuaries or rivers may only be in the danger zone after heavy rains. In saltwater, electrical current takes the path of least resistance, bypassing swimmers. Your marine parts and supplies suppliers talk about how tingling in the swimmer’s body is one of the early warning signs of ESD.

What can you do to prevent an electrocution or ESD fatality?

Here are 6 tips:

     1. Your marine sanitation manufacturers share how you never swim around boats and docks that use electricity.
     2. Post “no swimming” signs.
     3. Have a qualified electrician with experience in dock electrical service inspect your private dock annually.
     4. Install ground-fault protection on your boat and private dock.
     5. Ask your marina if they have installed ground-fault protection, and if the electrical system is inspected and        
     tested annually just in case someone falls overboard. No one should ever swim in a marina.
     6. Periodically test your boat for electrical leakage into the water.

What do you do if you see a distressed person in the water near a boat dock? Your marine parts Houston professionals discuss how a drowning victim often looks “playful,” while an electric shock drowning victim looks “distressed.” It may be difficult, however, to immediately determine either, so play it safe by not jumping in. 

For more information, parents, dock owners, boaters, and marina and boat club operators can go to the BoatUS Electric Shock Drowning Resource Center at www.BoatUS.com/Seaworthy/ESD.

So don’t forget to buy sanitation equipment here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Swimming Near Boat Docks Claims More Lives

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Your Marine Sanitation Analysts Say Consistency Should Never Be Overlooked 

Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the giant key to giant gains in the race.

Your marine sanitation professionals know that I’ve said it many times, it’s something you hear a lot around there: Key West Race Week is a long regatta. Five days and 12 races.  

First is starting. Your marine parts depot experts know that you are never going to have a good regatta in a tough fleet unless you can consistently get off the line well. So you need come into the event with some basic skills, but then you need to work on starting each day to gradually improve both boathandling and time and distance.  

Second is boatspeed. This is very important here. There is often a relatively steady wind, and more waves than wind, so you don’t want to tack too much. You have to get faster if you expect to get on the podium.

Thirdly, boathandling. This is actually the easiest area to make small gains each day. If you talk about each maneuver with your whole crew after the race, there are always ways to do it a little better. 

Get Prepared Early

If you’re waiting until the weather leg to get things hooked up, you’re too late.

If you have more than one spinnaker, get your tactician/speed doctor to choose a sail before the start. Your GTA 5 submarine parts specialists know that if you’re using a spinnaker pole, it can be hooked to the mast at the base or to a shroud with the afterguy. Have the topping lift and forgery already in place so it’s only a matter of popping the pole into place on the mast and hoisting the topping lift.

Your Marine Sanitation Experts Know That Patience Will Be Your Best Friend Out on the Water

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine holding tanks at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine holding tanks analysts know you should take your time, and stay on the rail.

Just as “ready about” prior to a tack is not a signal for a mass exodus from the weather rail, getting ready for a spinnaker set only needs minimal movement. 

On symmetrical boats, the only required movement is the bow person moving to get the pole up and the spinnaker pulled to meet the outboard end of the pole. The topping lift can be tailed by the pit person from the weather rail, as can the slack in the afterguy. 

The spinnaker sheet itself is the last thing you need to worry about. It doesn’t need to be touched until the sail is 75 percent of the way up.

The Perfect Turn

The goal is to turn smoothly from close hauled to broad reach. Turn too fast and you’ll end up too deep (with the wind too far aft). The spinnaker will blanket behind the mainsail, twist, and collapse. Turn too slowly and you won’t get down far enough.

Freeze!

Your marine parts source professionals know that movement kills speed. As soon as the sail fills, get in appropriate spots for the conditions: forward and leeward in light air; aft and to weather in more breeze. Then freeze!

Your boat cleaning products analysts feel that spinnaker sets don’t have to be a point of stress or downfall. Prepare, plan, stay relaxed, and let the magic happen! If you’d like to read the other articles in the series on make or break moves, check our our pieces on tacking and jibing.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine sanitation, marine holding tanks, and boat cleaning products.

via McKee’s Key West Minute: Small Steps, Big Gains

via THE KEY TO BETTER SPINNAKER SETS

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Your Ball Valves Specialists Know the Threat of Disease Always Lingers When You’re Tropical Sailing 

Raritan Engineering Company your ball valves professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to protect your health while tropical sailing.

Your ball valves experts know that tropical sailing means diseases, and the past decade has seen a grip of new threats facing anyone who spends their life next to the water. As of last week, there’s a new one. According to theScience Daily, scientists at the University of Florida have identified a patient in Haiti with a serious mosquito-borne illness that has never before been reported in the Caribbean nation.

it’s called “Mayaro virus”, and has similar effects of Chikungaya, only worse. Your ball valve weight chart analysts know that with the world’s attention on stopping the Zika epidemic, “the finding of yet another mosquito-borne virus which may be starting to circulate in the Caribbean is of concern,” said Glenn Morris, director of the UF Emerging Pathogens Institute. 

When we started our voyage in 1984 little did we realize that our lifestyle was suddenly to be much more healthful than living a sedentary life in Europe or in the USA! In the last 2 years, we have become more and more involved in our own health and decided to take some easy steps to insure a long cruising life … in good health! 

Your marine sanitation specialists know that the diver looks at her and tells her that now that he is in his 80’ he doesn’t clean as many boats in a week either! Part of our health is related to the physical activities we have in our daily life.People working in a office from 8-to-5 have so little physical activities as they sit most of their day … in front of a desk, in the car, in front of TV.

Your Ball Valves Analysts Recommend Sun Exposure to Boost Your Immune System

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine sanitation and on how to protect your health while tropical sailing at Raritan Engineering.

We don’t spend 8-hour days under fluorescent lights or other artificial lights but spend plenty of time in nice sunshine that helps our body produce vitamin D … Your 2 full port ball valve professionals say that contrary to what we often hear about staying away from the sun, now sciences shows that to expose our body for a limited time each day to the sun, is actually very beneficial to our health! 

In cities, we get exposed to electric radiations (domestic power and power lines), microwaves from mobile phones and ovens,, and plenty more waves from remote controls, electronic sensors, micro-transmitters, TV, phone and more. Luckily for us cruisers, we get exposed to lot less of these waves in remote anchorages and at sea. DC is less toxic than AC too. 

Coconut water is so healthy! Your 3 way ball valve experts understand that we are always happy to trade in the islands for coconut water, coconut meat, young coconut sweet meat … Unless we only eat pre-packaged food (frozen foods, canned food, … ) adulterated with pesticides and chemicals or genetically modified to please consumers in 1st world nations, we will eat much healthier foods while cruising around the world.

Modern life stress is generally absent as we experience freedom and great pleasure in meeting diverse cultures and so many nice people both ashore and as fellow cruisers. But we have to make sure the sailing life style does not create it’s own stress. 

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to protect your health while tropical sailing. 1) Have a good exercise routine in action before going sailing;  2) sun exposure will boost your immune system;  and 3) don’t underestimate the benefit of drinking coconut water.

Raritan Engineering has more information on ball valves, marine sanitation, macerating pump, and on how to protect your health while tropical sailing.

via Hold the Mayaro

via Health and Nutrition Aboard

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Your Marine Sanitation Experts Say Starting Out In a Dinghy Will Make Your Sailing Future Easier

Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to successfully sail your first dinghy.

Picture this: You’re 16 years old and it’s time to take driving lessons before you can get your license. Your dad pulls up in the driveway in a big 18-wheeler truck. “OK son, let’s start with parallel parking,” he says. Ridiculous?

Your marine sanitation professionals know that I think we can all agree that this new driver would be best served by learning first in a small car. Well, the same principles apply in learning to sail.

As adults, big, beautiful sailboats hold an allure for many of us, but by starting out in a dinghy you will be doing yourself a big favor in the future. There will always be lessons to learn as you move from one boat to another, but the basics remain the same. 

For a child, learning to sail in a dinghy seems natural. Once you’re an adult, though, a fear of stepping into a tippy and unstable vessel often surfaces. We see no other end result than our winding up in the drink! For this reason, many people opt for a larger, seemingly more forgiving big boat to learn on. 

You might ask, “Isn’t this a good thing? Won’t there be more time for me to react?” If you really want to learn how to sail, the answer is no. On a larger boat, with the reaction to any of your actions taking longer to happen, you are not reinforcing the correct maneuvers you should be making in a timely manner.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/category-pages/waste-treatment/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine sanitation and on successfully sailing your first dinghy at Raritan Engineering.

The worst and ultimate consequence in a dinghy is that you tip over. Is getting wet so bad? Tipping over and learning to right your boat again are all part of an important learning process and can even be fun. In my years of teaching sailing, “dumping-practice” day always started out with a bunch of apprehensive adults, only to wind up later with a group of reborn, exhilarated “kids.”

Taking a structured learn-to-sail program will always be your best bet. Instructors can quickly guide you in learning the ropes most efficiently. Learning in a group can be an extremely fun experience and a wonderful social event where you’re bound to make new friends.

So don’t forget these helpful tips on how to successfully sail your first dinghy. 1) Starting out in a dinghy you will be doing yourself a big favor in the future;  2) start young, because for a child, learning to sail in a dinghy seems natural;  and 3) think about taking a structured learn-to-sail program.

Visit us at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have more information on marine sanitation and on how to successfully sail your first dinghy.

via Learn to Sail in a Dinghy