Your Marine Toilet Systems Professionals Know the Frustration of Removing Layers of Bottom Paint 

Raritan Engineering your marine toilet systems experts would like to share with you this week these tips on how to remove many layers of bottom paint.

So, a couple of years back, you acquired a good old boat at a pretty good price—thanks to the market—but now you’re wondering how many coats of bottom paint it has. And what kind? You’ve put on a few coats of ablative antifouling since you’ve owned the boat. It has adhered well and has done its job. But each year, the bottom looks rougher and rougher—with big recesses where paint has flaked off. You sweated out some extra prep-work this season, and thought you had a nice, durable subsurface for painting, but each pass of the roller pulls up more paint. What’s going on here?

More than likely, you probably have too much paint built up on your hull, and this is affecting adhesion. How much is too much? Well, that depends on the type of paint: hard or ablative. With a hard paint, adhesion loss will begin around 20 mils of thickness (approximately 10 coats). Having more layers built up will make the inner layers less flexible and more likely to chip, flake, and lose adhesion. 

Ablative paints will begin to lose adhesion around 15 mils of thickness—but since the coating ablates over time, it should not build up like a hard paint. As you use the boat, the paint should wear away, or ablate, and every time the product ablates, it is releasing fresh biocide. 

Your Marine Toilet Systems Analysts Offer the Best Paint Removal Suggestions For You

If you’ve been applying two coats of ablative each year for the last three years, that’s already six coats of paint for a total of 12 mils, not including the previous applications. Your marine toilet systems specialists know that if you aren’t using the boat often enough, those layers are building up, and a slow-moving sailboat will not ablate at the same rate as a powerboat.

Paint removal options vary, and what’s best will depend on how much old paint there is and your personal preference. If there aren’t that many layers of bottom paint, you can sand them off with an 8-inch, dual-action orbital sander and 60-grit sandpaper, but this is hard work and requires careful safety precautions. Overzealous sanding can lead to dings and divots in the gel coat.

Another option is using a chemical paint stripper like Peel Away or Franmar Soy Strip. Chemical paint strippers break down the paint’s adhesive bond on the hull and make it easier to scrape down to clean substrate that can be repainted. 

Both of these methods will be time-consuming on larger boats. Before tackling this project, check out our October 2011 article, “A Mathematical Decision Maker,” which outlines a formula for determining whether the DIY approach is right for you. 

For owners of older boats with unknown, well-adhered coatings, a tie coat can help make sure successive coatings stick. The major bottom paint manufacturers—Interlux, Pettit, and Sea Hawk—all have priming/tie-coat products. 

How long you wait to strip down the old paint depends on how bad the adhesion issue is and your tolerance for a rough bottom; work boats go years without stripping. Eventually though, adhesion will suffer. 

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of all your marine supply needs.

via Too Many Layers of Bottom Paint?

Cheap and Easy Boat Cleaners You Can Make At Home

Raritan Engineering would like to share with you this week some great information about how to make your own boat cleaners.

Your marine toilet systems experts talk about how if you’ve got a locker full of nearly empty black-streak cleaners, waterline-stain cleaners, mildew preventers, bilge cleaners, and boat soaps, now is your chance to retire them all and reduce your cleaning arsenal to just four or five products that can fit in a small bucket.

This is not our first foray into the topic homemade maintenance supplies.  A few years back we dug into the topic of homemade bronze polishes and found a couple of concoctions that proved their mettle—so to speak.

Home brew No. 1: Salt and vinegar paste

Recipe: Dissolve 3 teaspoons of salt into 1 cup of white vinegar. Add enough flour to make a paste, then scoop the paste onto a clean sponge and polish. Rinse with hot water and buff dry with a soft cloth. Result: This polish worked surprisingly well. all and earned a rating of “Good” on our test scale.

Home brew No. 2: lemon paste

Recipe: Polish with a soft cloth soaked in a solution of lemon juice and baking soda, or sprinkle baking soda on a slice of lemon and scrub. (We made a paste as in Brew No. 1.) Result: After the mini-volcanic reaction of mixing lemon juice and baking soda settled down, the resulting paste powered off the stains exceptionally well with minimal scrubbing.

Home brew No. 3, Morris’ Mix:

Recipe: Subscriber Scott A. Morris makes his polish by blending polishing compound (not rubbing compound) with a small amount of silicone car wax—according to Morris, a little experimentation will yield your best mix. Result: “Fair to Good” overall, however, it took a bit of rubbing to clean our nasty bronze.

Benefits of Making Your Own Boat Cleaners

Your marine toilet systems professionals discuss how overall, the results in the home brew category were pretty impressive, particularly considering that the first two have all natural ingredients and that all three are economical to make. While the Brews Nos. 1 and 2 cleaned the bronze, they lacked the “luster” of products such as the Miracle cloth.

Of all the homebrew recipes we’ve tested, the one we’re most pleased with is our One-Penny mildew cleaner/preventer, which tester Drew Frye has tested extensively on his boat. We tried two formulas creatively named Formula A and Formula B, which cost just pennies to make.

Formula A

1 quart hot water

1 tablespoon baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)

2 tablespoons washing soda (sodium carbonate)

2 tablespoons trisodium phosphate (TSP)

Much like Concrobium (which it is modeled after), our homemade Formula A removed the mildew from test carpet on board and kept it away, even though the area got wet again. It was also very effective in the moist-environment lab test.

Formula B

1 quart hot water

2 tablespoons baking soda

2 tablespoons Borax

1 tablespoon TSP

Formula B was the second-place performer overall in our test of mildew sprays. It was certainly the best value. It cleaned well, prevented mildew from returning to the carpet, and greatly slowed mildew infection in the moist-environment test in the lab.

So don’t forget these ways to make your own boat cleaners. 1) Salt and vinegar paste;  2) lemon paste;  and 3) blending polishing compound (not rubbing compound) with a small amount of silicone car wax.

How to Fish Midge Patterns With Style

You’ve probably been there. Two hours from home, halfway through the thermos of coffee, knee-deep in cold water on a cold day, and not a single, solitary fish to show for it. They’re taunting you.

The most likely answer? Midges. Nine times out of ten, when you see so many rings that it looks like the result of an invisible hail-storm, the trout are hitting midges.

But one thing is very clear: trout love to eat midges. Your average brown trout in a midge hatch is like a fat kid with a bowl full of M&Ms. Although each of the bugs may not make much of a meal, a river is like a conveyor belt that delivers thousands of the tiny morsels to a fish. Midge hatches are especially prolific in tailwaters, those rivers kept at constant refrigeration by bottom-release dams.

Midges are usually small, but they aren’t necessarily microscopic. A size 18 barbless hook will provide satisfactory results in most situations. An angler carrying a small midge box with a series of tried-and-true patterns from size 18 down to size 22, with a very few smaller, will be equipped to handle 90 percent of the midge fishing situations out there. Generally speaking, big midges will allow you to use more complex patterns, such as the Copper John. For really tiny midges, stick to the simple stuff.

Try cutting the leader where you want the shot to stop sliding, and then knot it back together with a simple double surgeon’s knot. Crimp the shot above the knot and let it slide on down; the knot will keep the shot from hugging your fly.

A better bet, though, would be one of the new breed of vertical emergers based on the Quigley’s Cripple, such as the JLC Midge. Douse these flies with floatant and lube up your tippet for several feet. You won’t have the advantage of the split shot to keep your line taught and your chances of popping your tippet go up considerably, so be gentle.

Midge fishing in the winter time can be an angler’s only chance to avoid going stir-crazy. When your favorite freestone is snowed in, and your dog won’t even budge off the hearth, bundle up tight, load that thermos, and find a sunny piece of slow water down behind a dam in the valley.

Check us out here at http://raritaneng.com/ and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

via Steer Clear of the Marine Cleaner Con

via Pro Tips: How to Fish Midge Patterns in Winter – Orvis News

Volvo Ocean Race

Raritan Marine Toilet Systems Manufacturers Discuss Safety With Jackline Installation

Raritan Engineering would like to share with you this week some great information regarding jackline installation tips.

The “to-do” list begins to swell in October, a month when many northern hemisphere sailors start preparing their boats for offshore passages to warmer climates. High on many lists is the job of installing jacklines—the lines running along the deck to which we attach our safety tethers.

One of the most startling conclusions of our current test was that despite the International Sailing Federation’s (ISAF) generalized approach to jackline standards, the best material for a jackline varies as boat length increases.

Importance of Good Boat Maintenance

Your marine toilet systems professionals talk about how material selection is just one of many details regarding jacklines that deserves careful thought. If you are re-installing your jacklines or installing for them for the first time, be sure to read our upcoming test report.

  • Although you can use existing hardware for anchoring jacklines to your deck, finding adequate anchors on light boats can be difficult, since the deck and fittings might not be very strong.
  • Confirm that the entire system is of known minimum strength. ISAF standards recommend 4,500 pounds minimum breaking strength for webbing, although we recommend more for boats greater than 40 feet in order to provide an adequate safety factor.
  • Nylon stretches a great deal when it is wet, so nylon jacklines should be tensioned when wet.
  • Webbing jacklines should be twisted—not laid flat. This way they are easier to clip into when wet and they won’t flap in the wind.
  • Outboard-powered boats should never have jacklines or tethers so long that a sailor who has fallen overboard could be towed behind the boat near the prop.
  • Jacklines should stop well short of the bow. Fast boats, multihulls in particular, can hurl a person forward when the bow stuffs into a wave.
  • The cockpit should have at least one dedicated fixed point for clipping into. Consider installing dedicated clip-in points (padeyes) at other work stations—i.e. at the mast, or at the bow.
  • Rope jacklines can be acceptable on boats with higher coachroofs that allow the lines to be routed off the deck where they won’t fall underfoot.
  • When Dyneema or stainless cable are used on the deck, sheathing them in tubular webbing can reduce the chance that the jackline will roll under foot.
  • Jacklines must be clearly distinguishable from running rigging, so that there is no chance of clipping into the wrong line.
  •  Jacklines should be permanently rigged during a passage. It takes time to become accustomed to their use, and sailors have often gone overboard in benign conditions.
  • Jacklines should be rigged under sheets and over deck-routed control lines so that a sudden tack or jibe does not grab the tether.
  • If you rely on stainless steel hardware, use only the highest quality. (Wichard is one company whose hardware has consistently done well in our tests.) During our field research we came across a 46-foot boat with very tight 3/16-inch stainless jacklines attached with 3/16-inch stainless shackles.

Don’t forget these helpful jackline installation tips. 1) Confirm that the entire system is of known minimum strength;  2) Jacklines must be clearly distinguishable from running rigging, so that there is no chance of clipping into the wrong line;  and 3) if you rely on stainless steel hardware, use only the highest quality.

Not Quite Time for Winter Storage? Consider These Simple Fall Boat Maintenance Tasks

Boating and boat ownership during autumn months can mean different things depending on where you live. In the southern states, it could mean that the summer heat is finally dissipating enough to fully enjoy days spent out on the water. In the north, it may mean the beginning of the end of boating season.

Even if you’re not quite ready to store your boat for the season, there is still regular maintenance you might consider as the season changes. Many people may not realize what the lack of other boaters on the water (thanks to cooler temperatures) could mean for your time on the water.

Fall Maintenance and Safety Checks  

It can be a good idea to check your safety equipment and supplies, including:

  • Making sure the batteries in the very high frequency (VHF) radio are charged.
  • Signal devices are up to date and working.
  • There are plenty of warm clothes on board and they’re stored in a plastic bag to help keep them dry.
  • Make sure you leave a float plan telling people where you are going and when you should be returning.

Another thing to keep in mind is your battery bank, a group of batteries used (often exclusively) to start your boat’s engine. A battery that started perfectly fine in summer may not have the power to get you back in colder temperatures, because as the temperature decreases, so does a battery’s capacity, according to Trojan Battery.

Keep the Inside Dry

Cold temperatures can also mean condensation inside the boat, so ventilation becomes very important. When leaving your boat for more than a few days at a time, you may want to take a few extra steps to help make sure your supplies are not damp or susceptible to dirt and grime upon your return.

Doing an inspection of all plumbing is a good idea every few months, although particularly heading into fall. The hoses that have expanded all summer due to excess heat could now be contracting in the colder weather, and fittings may no longer be as tight as they should be.

While it may not be time to prepare your boat for the off season just yet, these tips may help ensure your safety and keep your mind at ease while you enjoy the fall boating season.

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering provides you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

Be sure to watch our latest video on marine toilet systems below. We are your #1 expert for marine sanitation supply needs.

via Jackline Installation Tips

via Not Quite Time for Winter Storage? Consider These Simple Fall Boat Maintenance Tasks – The Allstate Blog

Courtesy of Shake-a-Leg Miami

Your Marine Toilet Systems Distributors Discuss How Securing Your Boat Saves You Hassles In the Future

Raritan Engineering your marine toilet systems manufacturers would like to share with you this week some information regarding why you need to secure your boat.

Two different harbors suffered almost the same fate as Hurricane Irma raked South Florida with hurricane force winds. In both places, tens of thousands of dollars in damage might have been prevented had the owners of large vessels better secured their boats.

In Boot Key Harbor, Marathon, a fifty-foot houseboat broke lose from its anchor and went careening through the mooring field where dozens of boats where moored. According to the salvage crews I spoke with, the houseboat was one of the key contributors to the pile-up in the harbor that caused several boats to break loose and go ashore. 

The boxy houseboat has a colorful history. It had been moored at Boot Key for years, and its hulking mass made it one of the most conspicuous vessels. 

Your Marine Toilet Systems Suppliers Share Ways That Help You Avoid Possible Boating Disasters

Your marine toilet systems experts discuss how even some of the most attentively moored boats in the harbor were no match for its bulk.

The scene in Dinner Key Marina, 300 miles to the north in Miami was nearly identical. In Dinner Key, however, it wasn’t a slab-sided houseboat that bore down on a local sailing club, it was a slab-sided luxury motoryacht. 

As Irma pushed up the center of the state, the storm dragged a five-foot storm surge and strong northeast winds into Biscayne Bay. That surge, along with the wind, apparently snapped the powerboat’s docklines and sent it drifting down on the floating docks at Shake-a-Leg Miami, a community sailing program that Practical Sailor has supported with gear donations for many years. 

But now their boats, among them a fleet of custom Freedom Independence boats designed by Gary Mull and equipped for disabled sailors, is out of commission. The jumble of boats crammed against mangroves was a mirror image of the mess in Boot Key.

Although they’ve met their initial goal of $50,000 in a matter of weeks, the cost of clean-up is costing far more than they anticipated. They are hoping to earn another $50,000 this month. 

NKY firefighters repair emergency boat themselves, saving taxpayers $100K

The Covington Fire Department completed repairs to its emergency fire boat, which is now back on the water.

Project repairs were completed in-house by a crew of 20 Covington Company, city officials. Officials said their hard work saved the city thousands in tax dollars.

“It cost the city less than $20,000 to complete the project. If we were to have outsourced this sort of work, it would have cost approximately $125,000 to $150,000 to make the repairs,” Battalion Chief Seth Poston said.

Due to deteriorating conditions, the boat was deemed unfit for use and was removed from the Ohio River in February.

Repairs included eight new coats of paint to protect the boat’s undercoat, sandblasting the boat haul to remove corrosion, fixed dock bumper protectors and repairs to the boat’s fire pump engine.

Don’t forget these reminders regarding why you need to secure your boat. 1) Insurance premiums are can be expensive to pay;  2) repairing damage could take many weeks;  and 3) it is cheaper to secure your boat, than to replace it.

Click here and see how you can find more information about Raritan Engineering and on marine toilet systems.

via Loose Ships Sink Sailboats

via NKY firefighters repair emergency boat themselves, saving taxpayers $100K

Your Marine Toilet Distributors at Raritan Discuss Some of the Best Way to Maintain Safety While Using Propane

Raritan Engineering your marine toilet systems manufacturers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding great tips for preventing propane leaks.

Simply stated: We are not fans of portable LPG systems on boats. Even fixed propane heating (and cooking) systems that employ all the safety precautions recommended by the American Boat and Yacht Council or comparable advisory bodies can be dangerous, if they are neglected.

In the first part of our upcoming series of tests of propane system equipment, marine surveyor Capt. Frank Lanier outlines the basics of marine propane systems.

Because propane is heavier than air, it can slip into the bilge undetected, where a spark can set the boat ablaze. Propane locker explosions have also occurred. Here are some of his observations on propane safety:

Every LPG system in the United States is required to have a pressure regulator designed for use with LPG. These pressure regulators have relief valves that can vent gas, so it is critical that this gas cannot make its way onboard. 

Your Marine Toilet Systems Suppliers Continue Discussion About Maintaining Propane Safety At All Times

Your marine toilet systems experts talk about how leaks typically occur at fittings and connections, although they can occur anywhere in the system due to chafe or physical damage to supply lines or other system components. Use leak-detection fluid or a detergent solution to locate leaks.

A word on leak prevention at fittings. Typical marine LPG system connectors include 1/4-inch or 3/8-inch NPT (National Pipe Thread) and/or 45-degree SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) flare connections. 

Check your LPG system regularly for leaks or anytime you fire up that stove or grill. Installation of a marine-grade, LPG “sniffer” or fume detector is also highly recommended. If you have one installed, ensure the gas sensor is mounted as low as possible and near the range (where leaking gas is likely to accumulate), and test sensor operation on a regular basis. 

After cooking, leave one burner ignited and turn off the solenoid or tank valve. When the burner goes out, close the burner valve – this empties the line of gas and prevents leaking should a burner valve fail to seal. 

Propane Safety for Boats 

Relatively speaking, propane is a fairly new fuel aboard boats. As recently as the 1970s, the majority of recreational boats relied on denatured alcohol, kerosene, or diesel for cooking and heating tasks. The downsides to those fuels included fussy pressure tanks and cantankerous burners that often wouldn’t work. 

Propane is a great fuel for cooking and heating aboard, but it also deserves a healthy amount of respect.

Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), clean-burning propane changed all of that — no more hand-pumped pressure tanks or fiddling with clog-prone burners. But propane does have a couple of downsides. 

Shut it Off

The best way to prevent trouble between the tank locker and the stove is simply to close the propane tank valve when you’re not cooking or heating. If you tend to forget such things, you can install an electric solenoid valve after the regulator in the tank locker to give you a way to shut off gas flow remotely. 

Sniff it Out

Any boat equipped with a propane system should have a propane fume detector installed. Often referred to as “sniffers,” these devices use a sensor installed in the lowest possible part of the boat near possible leak sources, such as a stove or heater, to sniff out LPG fumes. 

Line it Up

The supply lines (generally made of rubber hose) that carry pressurized propane gas from the tank to the appliances in your boat obviously need to be in tip-top shape, so make sure they are not cracked or worn, and are secured with cushioned stainless-steel hose clamps at regular intervals. 

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Propane Safety for Boats | Boat Trader – WaterBlogged

via Double-check For Propane Leaks

Raritan Marine Toilet Systems Experts Discuss the Importance of Keeping Your Hull Clean

Raritan Engineering your marine toilet systems specialists would like to share with you this week some ideas for how to sodablast your boat’s hull.

Quick. What’s your least favorite boat maintenance project? Cleaning the bilge? Changing the engine oil?  … How about stripping off several years worth of bottom paint?

After that experience, Ralph decided to look into sodablasting, featured in the October 2011 issue of Practical Sailor. One of the chief complaints you hear about any for-hire boat work is the exorbitant price charged, but once you start to do the math—and start thinking about your health—a $1,500 fore-hire sodablasting job doesn’t seem so indulgent.  

One of the biggest mistakes an owner makes when estimating how much time it takes to strip a hull is to peck away at one of the easy spots where the paint is peeling and then assume the rest of the coating will come off just as easily. Ralph gives a more realistic formula for estimating the amount of time a stripping project will take.

Now that you’ve got your total area, you can figure out the amount of actual time it will take you to do the job. Start your stopwatch and attack one square-foot of an “easy” section. Do the same to a patch where the paint is well adhered. 

Here’s an example: Your boat has a 30-foot waterline, a 6-foot draft, a waterline beam of 10 feet, and is a medium-displacement vessel. Our fuzzy math for a medium-displacement sailboat  

WSA = Lwl x (Bwl + T)

says you’ve got 360 square feet of paint to strip: 30 x (10 + 6) (.75) = 360.

Marine Toilet Systems Suppliers at Raritan Share Excellent Hull Cleaning Ideas With You

Your marine toilet systems experts give information regarding how next comes the all-important apportionment of “easy” versus difficult paint removal. In this case, 85 percent of the hull is tough stuff, taking four minutes per square foot to strip: 0.85 x 360 x 4 = 1,224 minutes of backbreaking work. 

Now, how much is your time worth? And don’t forget the money you’ll be spending on scrapers, chemical strippers (if you use them), sand paper, etc. As much as I like to do my own boat work, this is one for-hire job that is worth considering.

You have a thick layer of antifouling paint on the bottom of your boat. It’s rough and worn around the edges, so you’d like to get rid of it and have a nice smooth bottom that will help you sail faster. 

The “soda” in soda blasting is sodium bicarbonate, which is similar to the baking soda you buy for cooking at home, but crystallized so it can be used in the rain. 

Because the soda breaks upon impact into micro-fragments, it doesn’t damage substrate the way sand blasting can. All it does is peel off the paint. Soda blasting can also be done on cars, masonry and rusted metal parts.

A professional blaster will roll in with a large truck, completely mask off the boat and the area beneath it, and then set to work. According to Armstrong, it takes about a day to set up the containment area for an average boat. “The soda blasting goes really quickly, once we have everything set up,” he says. “For most boats, the entire process takes one to two days and most of that time is the setup.”

Armstrong recommends that the hull also is lightly sanded after blasting to remove any remaining soda residue or paint that might have been only partially blasted off.

How much does it cost? According to Armstrong, the price varies depending on the length of the vessel. For example, a 30-foot boat might be around $45 per foot, while a 100-foot boat would be around $130 per foot because of the increased beam. “Our average job works out around $35 to $45 per foot,” he says.

When the barrier coat has dried and hardened, you can apply bottom paint in the color of your choice. Then you can launch and go sailing, safe in the knowledge that your boat is protected in the best way possible.

Click here and see how we at Raritan Engineering always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Making a Case for Sodablasting Your Hull

via How To: Soda Blast Your Boat

Your Marine Toilet Systems Analysts Take Time to Answer Your Life Jacket Questions 

Raritan Engineering is excited to share with you this week these pointers on what to keep in mind when deciding to buy your next life jackets. 

Your marine toilet systems specialists know that as a follow-up to last week’s blog post on safety tethers, it is important to note that these devices are just one component in a system that includes the jackline and a safety harness (typically combined with a personal flotation device, or PFD) and that these components should be evaluated together as a whole. 

One of the chief questions about an inflatable PFD-harness is whether you want an auto-inflating PFD or a manually inflating model. (Some sailors prefer just a harness without any integral flotation, also an option.) The auto-inflating devices are activated by water or pressure change; manual-inflating devices require the wearer to pull a lanyard. 

An inflated PFD can also interfere with releasing from the tether. Ordinarily, you would not want to release yourself from your tether, but there are cases in which it is better to cast yourself free from the boat, or you risk drowning. Several crew who survived the capsize of Wing Nuts in this month’s Chicago-to-Mackinac race were forced to detach themselves. One, Stan Dent, had to cut himself free. 

Your Marine Toilet Systems Experts Understand the Need to Get All the Facts Before Buying Life Jackets For Your Family

Your marine toilet systems professionals feel that typically, the tether attaches to the harness/PFD with a snap shackle that is released by pulling a small lanyard. As we’ve found in past testing, trying to locate a small tether and apply 30 pounds of pull while you are being dragged by a boat is no easy task.

Bottom line: If you use an inflatable PFD/harness, test your ability to release yourself with the PFD inflated and uninflated. As I mentioned last week, a quick and easy check of the release mechanism in your tether is to apply as much body weight as possibly on the tether and try to release yourself.

The BoatUS Foundation set out to debunk some of the myths:

1. Inflatable life jackets are zero maintenance – Let’s face it, pretty much nothing on a boat is zero maintenance. Before you head out for the day, simply check to ensure the CO2 cylinder is screwed firmly in and you can see the green indicator tab.  

2. One size fits all – While most inflatables are sized as “universal adult,” all have adjustable cinch straps that will provide a good fit for nearly every size of grown-up on the boat.  

3. Not a lot of choices – Actually, there are. Once you get past a range of colorful designs, there are two basic styles of inflatable life jackets: over-the shoulder suspender-style and waist-fitting belt pack. 

4. Inflatable life jackets are too expensive – Inflatable life jackets start at under $100. That is a real expense for some, but consider that a cheap life jacket that no one will want to wear is as useless as a hook without the worm. 

5. Inflatable life jackets are uncomfortable – Baloney! Inflatable life jackets are compact, don’t trap body heat, give full body movement, and can be as unobtrusive as small bait pouch attached to your belt. 

Visit us at www.raritaneng.com/ and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information regarding marine toilet systems and all of your marine supply needs.

via Manual vs. Automatic Inflatable Life Jacket / Safety Harnesses

via Five Inflatable Life Jacket Myths: Do You Know the Truth?