Marine Water Heaters Distributors at Raritan Share Ways to Install and Maintain Your Bilge Pump

Raritan Engineering your marine water heaters experts would like to share with you this week some great information regarding the ease of bilge pump installation.

The best bilge pump in the world won’t keep your boat dry if it’s not properly installed and maintained. While bilge pump installations are fairly straightforward—and definitely within the scope of DIY projects—there are several factors to consider (capacity, wire size, hose diameter, fuse size) before you begin, and there are some good rules of thumb to follow.

CHOOSING AN ELECTRIC PUMP

The first step is selecting the right bilge pump(s) for the job. We recommend installing two electric centrifugal pumps (preferably one with automatic water level sensor): a smaller pump mounted at the belly of the bilge to handle the incidental bilge water (rain, stuffing box drips, etc.) using minimum power and another pump mounted a few inches higher to handle bigger jobs. 

Capacity: For most mid-sized boats (30-35 feet in length), we’d recommend a 1,000-1,500 gallon-per-hour (GPH) pump for the primary and one with a capacity of about 2,000 GPH for the backup. 

When comparing output specs on multiple pumps, be sure the rating criteria are the same. New standards set by the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) require that compliant makers rate pump capacities so that they reflect real-world usage. The ABYC stipulates that pumps be rated with a head height (also called vertical lift) of 1 meter and a hose length of 3 meters, and with a head height of 2 meters and hose length of 6 meters. Head height is the vertical height of the hose outlet above the pump outlet. 

Key features: An automatic pump will rely on a water-level sensor such as a float switch to activate the pump. This can be a separate unit or one that is integral to the pump. This sensor should resist fouling and be easy to test for proper operation. 

INSTALLATION

The illustration above shows one recommended setup for automatic bilge pump installation.

Location: According to the ABYC, the pump inlet must be positioned so that bilge water can be removed when the boat is in a static position and when it is at maximum heel (ABYC H-22). The mounting location also should make it easy to service the pumps and to clean them, particularly their strainers.

When installing two electric pumps, the lower-capacity pump should have a built-in float switch, be mounted at the lowest point of the bilge, and be wired straight to the battery through a fuse. The higher-capacity pump is installed a few inches higher, but not directly above the smaller pump.

Plumbing: When plumbing an electric bilge pump, be sure the setup is designed to reduce head pressure as much as possible to maximize discharge capacity: use smooth hose sized to meet maker recommendations; keep hose runs as short as possible; and try to avoid bends, turns, and elbow fittings in the run. 

We Continue Talking About Easy Bilge Pump Maintenance

Your marine water heaters professionals talk about how the discharge line should rise steadily to the through-hull or loop. If there are any low spots in the run, water will pool there once the pump cycles off. This can create an airlock when the pump is activated again, and the pump likely will stall. 

Wiring: Use correct size wire and fuses: The proper wire size reduces voltage drop and properly fused wiring reduces risk of a locked rotor (a motor that’s trying to turn, but can’t) causing an overcurrent situation and potential fire hazard.

Consult the American Wire Gauge 3% voltage drop table (www.marinco.com/page/three-percent-voltage) to be sure you’re using large enough wire. 

For the fuse size, simply go by the pump maker’s recommendation, and you should be set. The fuse, per ABYC standards, should be installed within 7 inches of the power source.

Accessories: A few accessories to consider adding to the bilge pump system include a visual/audible bilge alarm, bilge switch, and a cycle counter. ABYC standards require an alarm on boats with enclosed berths. 

Automatic pumps should always be fitted with a readily accessible and clearly marked manual switch so that even if the owner isn’t around, anyone (crew, marina neighbors, or passersby) can locate and activate the switch when the need arises. 

If the larger-capacity pump has a float switch, we highly recommend connecting it to a bilge alarm (and alarm cut-off switch). That way, hopefully, the horn will get someone’s attention before the constant cycling of the pump drains your batteries. 

Two good references on bilge pumps and installing them are “This Old Boat” by Don Casey and Nigel Calder’s “Boatowner’s Mechanical and Electrical Manual.”

MAINTENANCE

Regular and frequent inspections of your bilge pumps are a must and should be included in the vessel’s overall preventative maintenance program. This helps you know when to replace worn or damaged components (bad float switches, deteriorated  hoses) before they fail. 

Keeping your bilge clean can be a hassle, but it doesn’t compare to the headache of a locked rotor or an impotent bilge pump in an emergency. 

So keep in mind these pointers when installing and maintaining your bilge pump. 1) The pump inlet must be positioned so that bilge water can be removed when the boat is in a static position;  2) when plumbing an electric bilge pump, be sure the setup is designed to reduce head pressure as much as possible to maximize discharge capacity;  and 3) This helps you know when to replace worn or damaged components (bad float switches, deteriorated  hoses) before they fail.

Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Arkup, the “avant-garde life on water” company, has designed a new luxury home that integrates solar on the roof and a newly approved lithium ion marine battery system. The main selling features are that it can rise with sea levels via jacks, withstand extreme weather, move as a regular electric propelled boat, and provide it’s own water plus – of course – electricity.

There are no specifications on the solar panels used – merely multiple notations that 30kW of panels can fit on the roof in 2,300 sq feet.

The systems are liquid or air cooled lithium ion battery kits. The individual battery packs are 5.7kW each and individual stacks go up to 137kWh. No where on the Arkup website it specific the exact number of units, however, they clearly state it is ‘customizable’ – so expect that the only limitation to stored power will be related to space.

The Orca system was recently approved by DNV GL – global ocean classification body – as being safe for maritime usage.

The Arkup is powered by an electric propulsion system – adding to Electrek’s electric boat collection. The system can move at up to 7 knots per hour with a range of 300 nautical miles. With its solar propulsion system – it could probably run indefinitely.

Two points from Arkup’s promotional material gives a feel for the market, in addition to luxury, that they’re aiming for:

Sustainable: Environmentally friendly, powered by solar energy, no fuel, zero emission, equipped with waste management, rainwater harvesting and purification systems, our living yachts are totally off-the-grid.

Resilient:  Made for all environments and designed to withstand category 4 hurricane winds, our livable yachts are equipped with a hydraulic self-elevating system to prevent from sea sickness and flooding.

Click here and see how we here at Raritan Engineering always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs. 

via Bilge Pump Installation and Maintenance Tips

via Solar and battery technology power a novel hurricane resistant floating electric house boat

Your Marine Water Heaters Distributors Discuss Extending the Life of Your Nonskid Deck 

Raritan Engineering your marine water heaters professionals would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to protect your nonskid deck.

As we found in our do-it-yourself nonskid test revamping a nonskid deck is a time consuming project, one that you’d rather not have to repeat every few years.  

Proper Application

Surface prep: We all know proper surface prep can make or break coatings applications, but it also directly affects the coating’s service life. Always follow maker’s recommendations.

Application: The surface must be clean and totally dry. After sanding, wipe it down with xylene, dewaxer, or acetone. Some paint makers warn against using solvents, so be sure whatever you wipe down with is compatible with the paint.

When it comes to using a paint and a nonskid additive, we recommend combining the mix-in and broadcast methods to get the most uniform grit pattern. Mix the nonskid additive with the paint, roll it on with a high-nap roller, and sift more aggregate on the paint while it’s tacky; once the paint dries, you can brush off the excess and apply a second coat in the same manner.

Your Marine Water Heaters Experts Share Your Love Of Properly Maintaining a Nonskid Deck

Curing: Your marine water heaters specialists talk about how to follow the maker’s recommendation for dry time, and be sure to allow the paint to fully cure before subjecting it to foot traffic. This allows the paint to achieve maximum hardness, making it more abrasion resistant and longer lasting.

Mat Installation: If you’re installing a self-adhesive mat, application is a no-brainer. Just be sure it’s where you want it before you stick it to the deck; contact adhesives don’t allow the small “wiggle” adjustments that epoxies do in application.

Testers also learned a few application lessons the hard way when installing nonskid mats with two-part epoxy. The epoxy usually has about an hour of pot life before it becomes permanently stuck to whatever it’s touching, so clean up any errant epoxy with a solvent as soon as possible. 

Regular Maintenance

Boat bath: Nonskid paints and mats should be cleaned regularly to remove abrasive salt spray and dirt. Wash with standard, mild boat soaps or household cleaners and a soft- to medium-bristled brush. 

Mold and Mildew: To prevent mold and mildew, you can lightly scrub the surface with an ammonia/detergent solution. To spot clean areas that are heavily soiled or show mildew, you’ll likely need to step up to more aggressive cleaner. 

Wax Not: While waxing can breathe new life into topside paint, the paint makers we talked to do not recommend waxing painted nonskid. Most nonskid paints and bead/powder additives have UV protection built in, and the paint formulas include UV absorbents, making waxing unnecessary.

Longevity expectations

Nonskid’s life expectancy can vary based on type (paint vs. mats, and paint type), boat location (UV-saturated South Florida vs. overcast Seattle), and how it is cared for. The soft-foam mats we tested did not weather as well as more rugged mats like Treadmaster—nor did some one-part paints, but they can be freshened up with a little sanding and a recoat. 

On Ocearch shark tagging boat, deck hand from Franklin is getting a taste for the shark world | Wildlife & Nature

In the midst of doldrums, D.J. Lettieri was a blur.

Thankless hours mashing dead fish into chum were broken up by running errands – filling the water coolers, dishing out snacks to crew and guests, tidying up lines and basic cleaning.

Lettieri is living the dream.

A 24-year-old Longwood University grad with a degree in environmental science the Southampton County native has his foot in the door of a research organization that’s working to spread the word on the importance of sharks to the health of the ocean.

While he mostly does grunt work, he said he’s benefiting greatly from rubbing shoulders with some of the top marine wildlife scientists in the country.

He doesn’t mind being the crew’s main deck hand as he learns.

“I take care of the boat,” he said. “When we’re not on expedition, I’ll be painting, scraping, cleaning – you know, boat stuff.

He never went saltwater fishing, but said he was fascinated by sharks from an early age.

“Don’t know what it was,” he said.

After graduating from Longwood, he wasn’t sure how he’d apply his degree to work until he saw that the Ocearch team was looking for people to work on the boat.

“We’re gypsies,” he said. “We were down off South Carolina the last expedition and now we’re here in the mid-Atlantic. We’ll be up in New York in a few weeks. It’s great. What’s not to like?”

The anglers on this expedition were having significant trouble finding any cooperative sharks willing to take the big pieces of bonita, a member of the tuna family, being offered on large hooks.

Within minutes he was wrestling a 3-foot-long sharp-nosed shark, bringing it up to the stern before it bit through the line.

His catch broke the monotony of what had been an extremely quiet day on the boat.

“This is what I want to do,” he said, running back to the bow for another hook.

So don’t forget these important tips for protecting your nonskid deck. 1) Always take time to prepare the surface;  2) After sanding, wipe it down with xylene, dewaxer, or acetone;  and 3) While waxing can breathe new life into topside paint, the paint makers we talked to do not recommend waxing painted nonskid.

Click here for more information regarding marine water heaters and see how Raritan Enginering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Preserving Your Nonskid Deck

via On Ocearch shark tagging boat, deck hand from Franklin is getting a taste for the shark world

Your Marine Water Heaters Distributors Talk About the Importance of Coffee Science and Boating

Raritan Engineering your marine water heaters experts would like to share with you this week some great information regarding great ideas for brewing coffee while boating.

A few years ago, a gourmet coffee maker contacted us*about a new blend it had developed especially for sailors. As I recall, the medium roast was formulated to create a full-bodied taste and aroma when savored outside in the salt air. 

As far as I can tell, no one yet has designed the ideal way to make cup of coffee underway aboard a sailboat. With the hopes of sparing other coffee-lovers years of frustration, or possible injury, I’m sharing my experience with the several methods we’ve tried.

Instant coffee: We spent a couple weeks re-caulking our ketch, Tosca, in Cartegena, Colombia and were chagrined to discover that Nescafe was served at all the restaurants in this coffee-producing country, prompting us to give it a try. Perhaps the South American version was different from the one we knew? Nope. 

Cowboy coffee: We were introduced to this method by a couple of Canadian conspiracy theorists in Fiji, who refused to buy anything made in an industrialized nation that they did not absolutely need. As I recall, all their meals — like their coffee — were made in one large pot. 

Your Marine Water Heaters Manufacturers Share Great Coffee Making Options With You

Stovetop percolator: Your marine water heaters professionals discuss how we picked up one of these at a hardware store in Venezuela. It worked tolerably well at anchor, when the tall pot remained upright, but if you need your morning coffee fast, waiting intently for the telltale gurgle and drip (it seemed to take forever) is a sadistic form of torture. 

French press: I only recently learned that I have been using this wrong all these years, which might be why I never really fully appreciated the taste. The correct approach involves freshly ground beans of a uniform coarseness (apparently only achievable with a special kind of grinder), and a carefully timed steeping. Here’s a link to one of several sites that describe the process in detail. There are so many ways this process can go wrong that I don’t know where to start, but two words sum it up quite well “burr grinder.” 

Stovetop espresso maker: We bought this at the same time we picked up the percolator. (Venezuelans have more kinds of coffee than we have breakfast cereals.)

We were giddy with the excitement of making espresso (real espresso!) onboard, until we realized that this contraption, in the process of brewing, transfers all of the water from the bottom of the container to the top.

Manual drip cone: In the end, we settled for this method. It uses a funnel-type basket that  accepts the same type of filters you use in drip coffeemakers. On long passages, we’d make one thermos full in the evening — in the sink, in case of spills — and this was usually accomplished without injury. 

Bottom line: It works, but not without risk. A good teapot that pours without spilling helps prevent disasters. When its just me in the morning, I still make my coffee this way.

We are currently investigating other methods of making coffee onboard, including the Aeropress, which works something like a French press to make espresso. Interestingly, it’s made by the same company that developed the far-flying Aerobie flying disc. 

Drinking more coffee can lead to a longer life, new studies say

One study surveyed more than 520,000 people in 10 European countries, making it the largest study to date on coffee and mortality, and found that drinking more coffee could significantly lower a person’s risk of mortality.

The second study was more novel, as it focused on nonwhite populations. After surveying over 185,000 African-Americans, Native Americans, Hawaiians, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites, the researchers found that coffee increases longevity across various races.

People who drank two to four cups a day had an 18% lower risk of death compared with people who did not drink coffee, according to the study. These findings are consistent with previous studies that had looked at majority white populations, said Veronica Wendy Setiawan, associate professor of preventative medicine at USC’s Keck School of Medicine, who led the study on nonwhite populations.

The study on European countries revealed an inverse association between coffee and liver disease, suicide in men, cancer in women, digestive diseases and circulatory diseases. Those who drank three or more cups a day had a lower risk for all-cause death than people who did not drink coffee.

“The fact that we saw the same relationships in different countries is kind of the implication that its something about coffee rather than its something about the way that coffee is prepared or the way it’s drunk,” he said.

The biological benefits — and caveats

Coffee is a complex mixture of compounds, some of which have been revealed in laboratories to have biological effects, Gunter said.

Both studies separated smokers from nonsmokers, since smoking is known to reduce lifespan and is linked to various deceases. However, they found that coffee had inverse effects on mortality for smokers too.

“Even if it was in some way true, it doesn’t make sense to me, because by smoking, you increase your mortality several-fold. Then, if you reduce it by 10% drinking coffee, give me a break,” said Ascherio, who was not involved in the study.

“I think it’s a dangerous proposition because it suggests that a smoker can counteract the effects of smoking by drinking coffee, which is borderline insane.”

The studies complement work that has been done on coffee and mortality, he said, and it has been reasonably documented that coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death.

“I think that the solid conclusion is that if you’re a coffee drinker, keep drinking your coffee and be happy,” Ascherio said. And if you’re not? “I think you can go on drinking your tea or water without a problem.”

Meanwhile, Gunter and Setiawan stand a bit more firmly on coffee as a health benefit.

Click here and find more information regarding marine water heaters at Raritan Engineering. We are your #1 experts in marine sanitation supplies.

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via Adventures in Onboard Coffee Making 

*Posted by Darrell Nicholson

via Drinking more coffee can lead to a longer life, new studies say

 

Your Macerating Pump Specialists Give You the Big Edge in Big Boat Racing 

Raritan Engineering Company your macerating pump analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding big strategies for big boats.

Your macerating pump experts know that my first superyacht race was in France in 2008 on a 112-foot Swan, and the first tactical call of the week was whether to race with the spare anchor, 300 feet of chain, and the Jet Ski, which we discovered in the bow locker. Lighter boats are faster boats, of course, but we quickly learned that when the boat weighs north of 200,000 pounds, it’s best to focus on sailing safely and not upsetting the captain by making him leave the toys on the dock.

Your marine parts plus professionals know that very few superyachts are built with racing performance as a top priority. The key to racing them successfully, therefore, is to understand the limitations we have to work with. That’s the fun of it, too, because there are always plenty of hands on deck. 

Once we heeled enough to get the leeward rail wet, which was around 14 knots of breeze, we could sail well to our handicap. In 15 knots and flat water, we could finish a tack in about one minute and 20 seconds. Your marine parts online analysts feel that the tacking angle was around 110 degrees, which isn’t too bad for a 320-ton ship. Light air was a different story. In less than 10 knots, the tacking angle was more like 130.

When the wind was up, we had one shot at sheeting the genoa on after a tack. If we tried to sheet harder, once the genoa was fully pressed, the computer would tell the captive winch to ease instead of trim because the loads were too high.

The start of a superyacht race is simple but rarely easy. Organizers wisely set up the races in either a pursuit format, where the boats start in order of handicap performance (slowest to fastest), or on a staggered-start format (typically two-minute gaps), with a handicap applied after the finish.

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Your Macerating Pump Professionals Help You Avoid the Kiss of Death

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine hardware at Raritan Engineering.

Well, that was the kiss of death. Your marine hardware specialists say that they started on starboard but were about 30 seconds late. Pretty good timing for the 500-plus-ton Perini Navi, but it presented a significant problem for us, as we were committed to our timing two minutes out. 

While doing so, we had to honor a mandatory 40-meter safety gap and still head up around the other boat’s transom to clear the starboard end of the line. The only way to slow our beast was to ease everything and bear away to a near flat run. By the time we got cooking again toward the starting line, we were more than 45 seconds late for our start and had completely screwed up the boat behind us.

Your marine parts near me experts say that in reality, tacticians and drivers get puckered when the boats get less than a boat length from each other, because it takes a shockingly long time to execute course changes. The last thing an owner wants is to be on SportsCenter’s highlights reel. 

Tactically, the play is for the faster boat to sail directly at the transom of the slower boat and put a man on the bow with a digital range finder and a communications unit, relaying distance to the afterguard in the cockpit. 

It’s essential to decide well ahead of the intersection how to approach each boat. It’s also beneficial to know which ones are happy to let you through quickly (perhaps they are scored in a separate class) and which ones won’t roll over without a fight. For a slower boat, the tactical game is based on sailing smart and minimizing the effect of the bigger boats as they stream past. 

Just as Mirabella V rolled us, 50 meters to windward, the captain of our boat remarked that Mirabella V had the tallest mast in the world. 

Nearly all the top racing superyachts have a playbook of maneuvers, which are ­updated each regatta so everyone on the crew knows where to be positioned for hoists, sets and drops. On Marie we had a five-­minute countdown to the kite drop that we rarely deviated from. 

Pulling 1,600 square meters of spinnaker cloth from the water, with 40 of your friends on board, is not a winning move.

Raritan Engineering has more information on macerating pumps, marine hardware, and marine water heaters.

via Big Boats, Big Tactics

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Your Marine Water Heater Analysts Help Defend Against Many Types of Mold

Raritan Engineering Company your marine water heaters specialists would like to share with you this week some great information regarding free and easy mildew growth prevention tips.

I’ve been growing several interesting varieties of mold and mildew at home. It is glamorous work, I know. While my wife, Theresa, disagrees, I know that you understand.

This Practical Sailor project led me to our last test of mildew cleaners, and some helpful tips for keeping mildew at bay.

Having been closely involved in our mildew cleaner test and the upcoming report on spray-on mildew “shields” that supposedly prevent mildew growth, I’m convinced that sprays can help fight mold, but these shouldn’t be your first weapon against it.

The best way to fight mildew onboard is to keep it from ever starting in the first place. Prevention is your best defense. When storing your boat or leaving it closed up for an extended time, a few simple steps will help prevent mildew.

Leave open all drawers, doors, and lockers to promote circulation. If covering the boat with a tarp, create ventilation between the tarp and the hull by hanging a few fenders between them. 

At the dock, a home dehumidifier, a dehumidifying stick (like the Golden Rod, effectively a small heater), or even a light bulb positioned under a vent can help promote air circulation and moisture removal.

Your Marine Water Heaters Experts Suggest Using Ventilation Products

Ventilation products

We’re big fans of cowl vents coupled with Dorade boxes (PS May 15, 1997) to let air in but keep water out. Your marine water heaters professionals know that a Dorade box is simply a water trap that employs a down-draft pipe offset laterally from the throat of the cowl vent. Vetus supplies a wide range of well-made cowl ventilators.

Twelve-volt fans (PS April 2008) and solar-powered vents (PS May 1, 1993) also keep fresh air flowing in the cabin. The Hella Turbo fan outlasted three other popular models in PS’s 2000 cabin fan longevity test. It also was among the recommended fans in our 2008 test.

Sails

• Never stow sails when they are damp or salty as salt attracts moisture. (Fresh-water rinse salty sails.) Air them out regularly, especially after a rain.

• Keep mildew-infected sails away from clean ones, and try to clean infected sails as quickly as possible. Stains are easier to treat when they are new.

• Never use bleach on Kevlar or nylon as it will destroy the fibers. Washing these or Dacron sails in a chlorine-treated swimming pool will turn them brittle and yellow. 

• Laminates are sure to grow fungus more readily than woven polyester most likely because the film is impermeable and moisture is not able to escape.

Now, to see how that shower mold is growing . . .

Visit us at Raritan Engineering Company and see how you can find more information and assistance regarding marine water heaters and other marine needs.

via Tips on Preventing Mildew Growth on Boats and Sails

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Your Marine Ice Makers Analysts Know How Important It Is to Replenish Your Energy

Raritan Engineering Company your marine ice makers specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to pack food for your next long sailing trip.

You probably have never asked yourself what you are going to eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner between 6th November and late January or early February 2017, but this is something the Vendée Globe skippers have to think about well in advance. They also have to take into account different considerations from us. Firstly, they need to eat more to compensate for the energy they require, which is much more than someone sitting in an office.

Freeze-dried food and ready meals

Plan for more? It’s not as simple as that. They want to have just the right amount, as they have to pay attention to the weight taken aboard, as this can seriously affect performance. Your marine parts analysts know that the weight of the food is far from being unimportant: 120 to 180 kilos of supplies (with the cleaning and personal hygiene products). When they calculate the ideal amount, the favourites work on the basis of 80 to 85 days of food, with the others taking more with them.

We should not forget that food has an influence too on our sleep. The nutritionist, Eve Tiollier, who works with Jean-Pierre Dick, explains, “alongside the bags of food offering the recommended daily intake, Jean-Pierre has an additional bag, in which he has sweet food or protein-rich food, which encourage him to sleep or on the contrary, stay awake.”

Packing for 90 days at sea is a balance between bringing the right food and bringing the right amount to keep the skippers in top form.

One bag a day

While some, like Arnaud Boissières only take aboard freeze-dried food, for many skippers, the supplies include 40 to 50% vacuum packed meals and 50-60% freeze-dried. Your marine water heaters professionals know that even if the latter has made considerable progress ove the past ten years in terms of variety and taste, they tend to be less appreciated by the skippers than the ready prepared meals.

Your Marine Ice Makers Experts Recommend Vacuum Packed or Freeze-Dried Meals for Simplicity

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice machines at Raritan Engineering.

Your marine parts corp experts understand that they do however offer a number of advantages: they don’t take up much space, they are very light and fulfil the nutritional requirements… particularly as the fresh water that is used to prepare them is supplied by the desalinator. They just have to heat it up on the ring (camping stove), stir in the sachet and it’s ready.

A few necessary goodies

Then there is another important aspect to consider with the food. The question of pleasure. This is in fact vital, as it affects the mood and therefore the performance of the skipper. Alex Thomson has already calculated with his coach, Lawrence Knott, that he may lose around twelve kilos during the race and has therefore adapted his supplied accordingly.

So don’t forget these helpful suggestions on how to pack food for your next long sailing trip. 1) Consider using freeze-dried and ready meals;  2) only eat one bag of food per day;  and 3) have the right food to make eating enjoyable to boost positive attitude.
Raritan Engineering has more information on marine ice makers, marine water heaters and the marine parts depot.