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Your Seacocks Manufacturers Share Amazing Tips On How to Win That Crucial Race

Raritan Engineering your seacocks professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding the many ways to win a race.

I had one of the best high school sailing coaches in the country and one of the best college coaches, but boy, did they ever approach the start of practice differently. Your seacocks distributors talk about how my high school coach placed our names on the board in order of where we currently stood on the team. My college coach intentionally put us in random order on the board. 

We often hear about “fear of failure,” but it’s seldom we hear about its equally evil twin, “fear of success.”

The anticipation of screwing up the lead you’ve achieved can create a whirlwind of thoughts that are unrelated to sailing smart and fast. er events? What will people say? Do I really deserve this?”

Thoughts related to two very different outcomes, failure or success, have something in common. Both have nothing to do with the task at hand.

Remember that we have seacocks for all your sanitation needs here at Raritan Engineering. We are simply the best.

Outcomes are largely based on uncontrollable variables, like how fast other people are sailing. Wanting to be in the lead has little to do with actually being there (except that it may have helped you to work hard to become good). If you do find yourself in the lead, you did something right. 

For some, being ahead is the norm. For others, it can be viewed as a fleeting moment. How do you interpret the situation of being ahead? If you look at it in a neutral manner, like it’s simply information, then you are on the right track.

First, notice the language in your brain. Is it helping or hurting? Does it make you tense or loose? Awareness is a key to success.

Then, embrace controllable variables. These may enter your mind, but remember “garbage in, garbage out.” In other words, you can practice steering your thoughts to the important variables of sailing fast. 

If you’re going to play mind games with yourself, play games that work for you, not against you. I often think of golfers who have told me, “I do great on the back 9, but I’m lousy on the front 9.”

Picture what you want to happen, rather than what you want to avoid. Your mind programs your body for action. It’s OK for fears of failure to come and go, but allow for more repetitions of what you want. More importantly, picture the steps involved.

Practice mental skills. These are like any other skills. Could you imagine having good roll tacks without practicing them? 

Choose your marine products here at Raritan Engineering. We always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via What to do When You’re Winning

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Your Seacocks Professionals Help You Use Your Sailing Skills in Everyday Life Situations 

Raritan Engineering Company your seacocks analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how sailors are just good at everyday things.

Your seacocks experts understand that you’re winning at this life thing. You’re well-traveled. You have strong opinions on the meat industry and an arsenal of impressive life hacks you picked up while backpacking in Burma. 

But there’s always someone out there that’s cooler than you. Like sailors. You’ll never be as cool as a sailor. Here are nine everyday things they’d crush you at without even trying.

1. Parallel parking
I know, I know. You’re great at parallel parking. You should be the president of it. The words three-point turn don’t even exist in your vocabulary. But you’re an amateur. 

2. Walking straight when drunk
Your poker face is a farce. We all know how many tequilas you’ve had as soon as you see-saw to the bathroom like a sausage in a pinball machine. Legs don’t lie, unless you’re a sailor. 

3. Straightfacing a double entendre
Sailing terminology is (wait for it) an ocean teeming with metaphors, puns, double entendres and that’s-what-she-saids. You can’t think of a boating pun that hasn’t been exhausted. Chuckling at words and phrases like ‘breastlines; cockpit; coming about; and, in need of a tug’ is the sole folly of us landlubbers. 

Visit us at Raritan Engineering Company to find seacocks for all your sanitation needs.

4. Giving directions
‘Ja, so like take a right by the tree and then pass the school. I think it’s a school. Maybe it’s prison. A few blocks behind that is a road. I can’t remember the name of it but just call me when you’re outside.’ These are not directions. 

5. Dressing appropriately
Weather app, shmeather app. Even the best ones resort to some measure of horoscopic hocus pocus and the problem is nobody has built one out of actual human bones. Sailors have bones. They have bones that tingle, crack, wobble and creak. 

6. BDSM
Don’t fib. The reason you’ve never been open to the idea of bondage isn’t because it’s taboo. It’s because you’re rubbish with ropes. Tying your beau to a bedpost isn’t the same as tying a shoelace. There are safety issues. 

7. Pulling an all-nighter
It was the pillar of your tertiary education, but somewhere along the line the insouciance of burning the midnight oil turned to chronic anxiety. 

Caffeine is impotent, hardcore drum and bass is discombobulating and even The Panic Monster can’t keep you awake anymore. But sailors are fueled by something stronger than caffeine and panic combined: fear of the unknown. 

8. Letting things go
When something falls in the ocean it’s gone forever (unless you’re James Cameron). The only thing to do is forget about it and move on while muttering something profound like ‘It belongs to the ocean now, man.’ 

Choose your marine supplies here at Raritan Engineering. We always have more information on seacocks and any of your marine supply needs.

via Nine Everyday Things a Sailor is better at

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Your TruDesign Experts Know How to Help You Avoid Those First Timer Mistakes

Raritan Engineering Company your TruDesign professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding great advice for all cruisers. 

Advice for first time cruisers from those who’ve been there!

Is one of your plans this year to spend less time being a land-lover and explore cruising long term? Your TruDesign analysts say, please read what these seasoned cruisers had to say about their advice for first timers.

Your marine parts express experts know that a retired associate professor of Physical Therapy from Florida International University in Miami, Willie has been sailing for more than 40 years with her husband, Mark.

“I suppose one thing I could say would be for the neophyte to learn that there is no rush, that they don’t have to be somewhere so badly that they must risk life and vessel to make a deadline.”

Stephen has cruised for more than 30 years. Your seacocks experts know that he is currently in Atlanta, Georgia, between boats, and prepping for a return to The Bahamas.

Your TruDesign Specialists Suggest Not Rushing to Reach Your Destinations

You can find more information as well as get assistance on seacocks at Raritan Engineering.

“If you are sailing as a couple find your own area/s of competence. This will help you to keep the peace on your boat.

Your marine head unit specialists feel that Paola learned to sail in dinghies as an adult before her first trip on a cruiser from Poole to Cherbourg at the age of 35. Not put off by the cold overnight Channel crossing, she then sailed with her husband between the UK and Spain over a period of few months before deciding to give up work and home and move permanently onto their Bavaria 37.

The couple sailed from Cowes to Buenos Aires and back over a period of five years. They are now back in the UK living on land, but still spend holidays sailing to Europe.

“Keep it small and simple”

“Simplicity – Avoid electrics and electronics wherever possible. This will save you money too. Install wind vane self steering – equivalent to an additional crew member and all for free.”

Your marine cylinder heads professionals know that his book, Last Voyages, describes the lives, sailing careers and final voyages of some of the world’s finest sailors who were lost at sea was published in January 2017.

Kieran is the editor of Yachting Monthly. He has been sailing for about 30 years and owns an small, elderly and slightly grubby plastic sloop.

“Consider carefully what you wish for since the reality can be both the fulfillment of a dream and the ultimate nightmare, but if you feel you have the skill, resilience and determination then there is no better way of life – so just do it.”

“Don’t be over reliant on technology, use traditional astro navigational skills as well. A wind vane steering system and a well balanced sail plan will take you around the world for free – power hungry technology can lead you into a state of electro- mechanical stress.”

You’re ready to slip the lines, the engine’s ticking, life jackets are on, and breakables are stowed, but are you really…

Raritan Engineering has great pricing on TruDesign fittings, seacocks and ball valves.

via Advice for first time cruisers from those who’ve been there!

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Your Seacocks Professionals Know the Importance of Good Quality Knots

Raritan Engineering Company your seacocks analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why you should know your knots. 

Your seacocks experts know that I can tie a bowline around my waist with one hand. Either hand, in fact. Which is why I’m drinking Chuck Larson’s beer right now. Chuck bet me the case of Rhinelander shorties he had on the seat of his truck that I could not perform this trick, in one try, with my left hand. 

It was the taut-line hitch that helped me score Chuck’s beer. The sun finally came out while we were trolling in his Yar-Craft for walleye and so it seemed to me an appropriate time to deploy the sun top, but Chuck just muttered, “It’s broke.”

The adjustable nylon straps that secure the aft top bow to the gunwales were missing. Those straps hold the canvas taut (foreshadowing here), and without tautness, the top would just sort of sag over us. 

Eventually I told Chuck about the time I used a sheet bend to turn a water hose into an emergency anchor line, and how I learned to tie the bowline with one hand. The premise was that a Scout who has slipped off a cliff and landed on a precarious ledge could tie the bowline, which makes a loop that will not slip, around his waist and then be pulled to safety by his buddies from above.

However, this is the only way I learned how to tie a bowline: around my waist with one hand. And if I want to tie one today — to make a loop on a line to toss over a piling, for example — I orient the line with the loop toward me and imagine I am making that knot with a broken arm. I’m practicing right now. Without setting down my beer.

Go to http://raritaneng.com/product-category/trudesign/seacocks/ and see how you can always find more information as well as get assistance on seacocks and all your marine needs at Raritan Engineering.

Learn How to Tie Common Boating Knots

Your seacocks specialists know that there is nothing like cruising through the open water on a pleasant, hot day feeling the mist of water lightly spray over you. The pure relaxation and excitement of traveling from port to port or island to island is one of the greatest feelings any avid boater can think of. 

Bowline Knot

The Bowline Knot is another useful type of knot used in situations that require a firm hold that is easy to untie in a moment’s notice. Once this knot is fully tied, it forms a fixed loop at the end of the rope designed to put around a post or cleat for temporary mooring. This knot is strong and secure but should not be used in life or death situations.

  1. Lay the rope across your left hand with the free end hanging down.
  2. Bring the free end up forming an eye hole (commonly called the rabbit hole) and pass it through the eye hole from the underside of the rope. The step is referred to the rabbit coming out of the hole.
  3. Wrap the free end around the standing or fixed part of the line and back down through the eye hole. This step is referred to the rabbit traveling around the tree and back down into the hole.
  4. Tighten the Bowline Knot by pulling on the free end while holding the standing or fixed part of the line.

Clove Hitch

A Clove Hitch is used for a variety of applications but is primarily used to tie to dock posts for temporary mooring. This knot is very easy to tie and untie making it an excellent binding knot. The Clove Hitch should be used with caution because it can slip if there isn’t constant pressure on the line or if the object it is attached to rotates.

  1. Wrap the free end of the line around the rope around the post or object.
  2. Cross the line over itself and wrap the free end around the post again.
  3. Slip the free end under the last wrap.
  4. Pull the knot tight by pulling the free and standing end of the line.

Now explore open waters and feel safe knowing that your boat and other essentials will be tied securely to your boat. If you need any mooring accessories for your floating boat lift or dock shop at JetDock today!

Click here and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on seacocks and all of your marine supply needs. 

via Off My Dock: The Beer-Case Bowline

via Learn How to Tie 5 Common Boating Knots

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Your Seacocks Analysts Know That Boat Fenders Do Not Have to Be a Big Problem 

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week some awesome information on seacocks.

My main problem with boat fenders is that they appear to violate the cardinal rule of cruising: any object you bring on the boat should serve at least two purposes (the way your crewmate’s favorite yellow shirt makes a great “Q” flag).

Recently facing a shortage of fenders, I came upon a temporary substitute—heavy-duty dry bags. Filled with air, these simple roll-top bags work just like inflatable fenders.

Someone industrious, of course, could insert an inflatable urethane liner into a more rugged, welded PVC dry bag, and achieve the same result. The outer bag could be easily fitted with web eyes for securing drop lines. 

Durability is a question. I’m not sure how long a conventional dry bag will hold up when used as a fender. If they are constructed with a material similar to that used to make the inflatable fendersfeatured in our recent test, they should last several years.  

So here’s a challenge: Is there perhaps another fender design that could help it serve two distinct purposes? Or are there more uses for a conventional fender than first meet the eye?

Your Seacocks Experts Offer You Some Great Design Options

Your seacocks specialists know that for those who’d rather just stick with the tried-and-true, here’s a DIY approach to more conventional fenders.

DIY Fender Board

The simplest form of fender board is adequate for most needs. All that is needed is a 3- to 4-foot length of 2” x 4”, 2”x 6”, or 2”x8”. As a guide, I’d start a t 2”x 4” for a 20-foot boat, 2”x6” for a 30-foot boat, and 2”x 8” for a 40-foot boat.

On a larger boat, you may want to use a slightly longer board, perhaps up to 6 feet long. Anything longer than that, however, is likely to take two people to handle, and be a nuisance to store.

A hole slightly larger than the diameter of the suspension or drop lines (say 9/16-inch hole for a half-inch line), is drilled through the larger dimension at either end of the board, about 6 inches from either end.

Next, round the ends of the plank and chamfer all edges. Your lines should be long enough to suspend the plank down to the waterline from whatever stanchions or cleats you plan to use.

After threading the lines through the holes, tie a figure-eight, stopper knot at the bottom of each line, and you’re finished.

You can use your fender board with conventional round fenders, or you can purchase solid rubber cushions made specifically for attaching to 2×4 or 2×6 spars. 

The one embellishment you might wish to consider, if you have sufficient time and/or inclination, is a laminated fender board. This board is composed of three layers of 1”x 3” fir, hickory, or ash. 

Visit us at http://raritaneng.com/product-category/trudesign/seacocks/and see how you will always find more information regarding seacocks at Raritan Engineering.

via Building a Better Boat Fender

Your Seacocks Professionals Make Those Difficult Sailing Conditions Look Much Easier With These Tips 

Raritan Engineering Company your seacocks analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to get through those low pressure situations.

Your seacocks experts know that in conditions which are typical of the leading edge of a fast moving South Atlantic low, it is the ability to regulate speed and the level of attack which is being tested for the skippers at the top of the Vendee Globe fleet this morning.

Winds are reported to be from just east of north at 25kts, with relatively flat water. The speedo on board Alex Thomson’s race leading Hugo Boss has been hovering around 24-25kts for a 30 minute period and the British skipper is 112 miles ahead of second placed Armel Le Cléac’h on the early morning ranking.

On seas, which are still relatively calm, the monohulls have ideal conditions to threaten the 24-hour record set by François Gabart in 2012 (534.48 miles). They need to achieve an average speed of 23 knots to sail 550 miles in one day and the skipper of Hugo Boss has been at those speeds since early last night and looks set to maintain that pace for the next couple of days…

Heading towards Tristan da Cunha

This foiling folly should indeed last two or three days as they ride on the back of the low sliding down very rapidly towards the Roaring Forties. 

It is therefore practically certain that Yann Éliès (Quéguiner-Leucémie Espoir) will be left waiting almost 600 miles back at the station for the next train off Cape Frio. 

via Vendee Globe – Riding the area of low pressure

via The Dark Art of Weather Analysis

Your Seacock Specialists Have the Best Polishing Tips Around

So let’s say you’ve now decided to upgrade to a power buffer. There are a number of units from manufacturers such as 3M, Makita, and Shurhold, and the most popular models have common features. First up is orbital operation.  

The second key feature to look for in a buffer is variable speed. You need different rpm or speed settings for different types of tasks. 

He starts a project by washing down the boat with a dish detergent like Dawn to remove any oil and scum. For tougher stains, he uses On & Off Hull & Bottom Cleaner. 

Fear of Wet Sanding

So you’ve applied two coats of compound and you’re still not happy with how your boat looks? It may need to be wet sanded. Relax, this is not as scary as it sounds. Working by hand, use quality sandpaper like 3M’s Imperial 2000-grit product, keep it wet, and work in small areas to remove scratches. 

Your Seacocks Experts Want to Remind Us to Get the Right Materials for the Job

Your seacocks analysts know that the next step, he says, absolutely calls for the right materials. Plain wax does not restore faded gelcoat. It is a UV protectant that will look good for a couple of weeks. Instead, Hilton likes Presta Strata Ultra Cutting Crème, which is a compound and polish in one.

In any case, Hilton says when you start working, do so in a small area. Applying compound with a rag to the whole boat and then buffing it out is the wrong approach. 

Hilton applies his polish with a 1-inch paintbrush in three horizontal strips in a 1- by 3-foot area. He then goes to work with a wool pad on a slower speed setting on his buffer.

A wool pad should be used for more oxidized surfaces, according to Hilton, and a foam pad works for less faded surfaces. 

Swirling is a bigger issue than burning your gelcoat, Hilton says. “You have to be laying on a spot for a really long time to burn it,” he says. To avoid swirls, he adds, clean your buffing pad regularly. 

Take your time, use the right equipment and material, and you’ll take the intimidation out of making your boat look great.

So don’t forget these helpful reminders when trying to buff your hull. 1) Make sure you do your homework before buying a hull buffer;  2) wet sanding is not as scary or as difficult as it sounds;  3) and a wool pad should be used for more oxidized surfaces, while a foam pad works for less faded ones.

Visit us at http://www.raritaneng.com/  and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on seacocks and on the best hull buffing tips around.

via How to Buff Your Hull the Right Way

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Your Marine Head Units Experts Say That There Is Hope On the Horizon

Raritan Engineering Company your marine head units analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding some need to know information about the future of boating.

Your marine head units specialists say to raise your hand if you know of some boating companies that have faced severe difficulties, went bankrupt or restructured in the last few years.

Thanks, you can now all put your hands down.

So let’s dive in and see what the future of boating is going to look like!

I took the stock analogy to make it simpler, but I was actually referring to 2 different things: A technology law and a futurist.

1. A Technology Law

Your best marine head unit professionals know that this law is one of the most important principles in the history of technology. This observation was originally introduced in 1965 by Intel Co-founder Gordon Moore and is referred to as Moore’s Law. 

One of the most important characteristics of the Moore law is the word “double’. Double indicates that we are growing exponentially and not in a linear way. To understand the difference between linear and exponential, let’s take a simple task as an example. 

2. A Futurist

Raymond “Ray” Kurzweil is an American futurist, author, computer scientist and inventor. Your waterproof head unit analysts say that out of 147 predictions that Kurzweil made in 1990, 115 of them have turned out to be correct. Another 12 have turned out to be essentially correct (off by a year or two). 

Ray is today the director of engineering at Google. I have read a couple of his books and watched a few of his speeches. He is one of the most respected scientists on the planet. So when Kurzweil predicts something, you should really pay attention to it.

So why is the future of boating NOT what you think it will be?

The boating industry, just like any other industry, is just a reflection of the different areas of our society such as business, economy, technology & trends.

Your marine head experts know that if you study the history of technology, you will notice that human progress follows an exponential path contrary to a linear way of thinking by the majority of the public.

This is happening because the more we progress, the more we have access to resources, knowledge and technology to progress even faster.

In a bit more than 10 years time, the 20th century’s worth of progress will happen multiple times in the same year.

And all of this can be explained by to the Law of Accelerating Returns

Did you know that your smartphone today has more computing power than all the Nasa computers had when they sent the first Apollo mission to the moon in 1969?

The Challenges:

Let’s try to analyze the potential challenges that our industry is facing.

1. The trend

A few days ago, I did some research on Google trend. I wanted to see the popularity of the term boating over the last 10 years and noticed a consistent steady decline.

So why is the general population less interested about boating?

Two months ago, I was talking to an executive at one of the top boat builders in the world. I asked him who their biggest competitor was. Surprisingly, he didn’t mention another boat builder. He said that their biggest competitor was all the possibilities offered to the general public nowadays like travel, entertainment, technology, etc.

When I was young, I remember sometimes being bored, so I planned some activities with my friends like fishing or boating on our little boat.

Your Marine Head Units Professionals Discuss How the Boating Industry Needs Our Help

You can find more information as well as get assistance on TruDesign and on need to know information about the future of boating at Raritan Engineering.

Your TruDesign experts know that our new generation are not bored anymore, they are constantly connected to social media, smartphones, apps, Internet, etc.

2. The economic climate

Boat sales are ultimately correlated to the job market.

Have you ever heard of the term technological unemployment?

Several studies, like the one conducted by the Martin School of Business, predicts that 48% of current jobs will be lost in the next 15 years due to technological unemployment.

More and more corporations keep replacing jobs with machines. Here is anarticle I just read yesterday about Mc Donald’s hiring 7000 new cashiers, but they are not the typical employees, they are automated ones.

Technological unemployment is not the only reason for massive changes in our economy.

This trend is confirmed if you look at the growth of temp agencies. (See:Temp Jobs Up 57% Vs. 4% For All Others Since Aug. 09)

The American Dream is evolving.

Forget the typical life plan: school, college, job for 40 years & retirement. People change careers more often and no longer follow a structured life plan.

All those changes in the job market and economy will make it more difficult for the general public to access boating.

3. The sharing economy

If 10 years ago I asked you to stay at somebody’s house during a business trip, would you have said yes?

When you know that the average boat owner uses their boat not even 2 weeks per year, this concept makes quite a lot of sense.

The sharing economy is becoming huge in the car and travel industry. I assume that it will grow in the boating industry too.

4. More challenges

On top of this, the boating market will keep facing other challenges such as:

-Environmental activism

-Peer pressure due to increase in income inequality.

-Difficulty accessing moorage in marinas,

-Lack of interest from the newest generations (Gen Y, Millennial, etc)

Those companies share the same pattern. Peter Diamandis, founder of the X Prize foundation and Singularity University called it the 6Ds of the exponential growth:

Digitized (digitize product or service)

Deceptive (you don’t see it coming until it reaches the tipping point)

Disruptive (game changer)

Dematerialize (remove,material aspect, infrastructure)

Demonetize (remove operating cost)

Democratize (globalise via web)

The success of those companies can give us an important lesson: The rules of the game of business have changed.

You must adapt and change the way you do business. In 10 years time, 50% of the Fortune 500 companies will disappear.

If you operate the old way, you are certain to face major difficulties.

So don’t forget this important information about how to help save the future of boating. 1) Maintain the interest in boating and helping others to develop an interest;  2) go boating more often;  and 3) don’t become too technilogically advanced too quickly.

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine head units, TruDesign, seacocks, and on need to know information about the future of boating.

via 5 Things You Need to Know About the Future of Boating

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See Why Your Seacocks Professionals Say Performance Boaters Don’t Deserve the Bad Rap

Seacocks

Raritan Engineering Company wants to keep you abreast of how to keep safe while enjoying fast speeds out on the water.

Performance boaters have long taken a bad rap for being gold-chained, fat-walleted, egotistical blowhards who quickly swap a check for 2,000 hp marine missiles and menace the waterways.

Forget that stereotype. Today’s go-fast boaters are more cerebral, more competitive and less likely to assume they know it all. The prevailing attitude is that with speed comes responsibility. 

Apt Pupils

Jim Waters, a top-level Hollywood executive, is a longtime boater. He recently acquired a DCB (Dave’s Custom Boats) twin-engine catamaran. Faced with a more aggressive hull style and increased horsepower, he decided to seek out additional training.

“I was tired of that. I wanted to know more about how to handle the boat, dock it, launch and load it. I wanted to be more confident in my ability to take it out alone,” she said.

Scott was happy to see her take a more active interest in the sport, and wanted to be a better driver himself, so their week’s vacation at Desert Storm began with two days of instruction from Tres Martin and Brad Schoenwald, partners in the Ultra High Performance Course. 

Competition? After attending these classes, I also met up with Craig Barrie, vice president of sales for Donzi Marine and chief instructor for hands-on training aboard the Donzi 38 ZR Competition. 

Speed 101: Turning

Both classes began with basic boater safety training and the “Rules of the Road,” aka the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, or Colregs. Before you can fly, you have to learn to walk.

Your Seacock Experts Help You Gain the Skills Needed to Be Safe While Going Fast

“That may be true for some boats,” Barrie said during our later tests, “but I set mine up myself and am confident in its turning ability.”

Your seacocks specialists ask, “how do you safely turn at speed?” Tres Martin has a special technique.

For both Barrie and Martin, setting up for the turn is as important to its flawless execution as actually making it. The steps are deceptively simple.

To set up or “get set,” do a head pan to check for other traffic. Pull back slightly on the throttle. Martin repeats again that he wants you under 70 mph before the maneuver.

In Martin’s turn, hands on the helm at 3 and 9 o’clock, he executes the turn by rocking the helm 180 degrees then returning to center repeatedly — that rotation changes depending on the steering ratio of the helm. 

“Now, if you want to turn sharper, add more speed.” It seemed counterintuitive, but as I added throttle, the boat arced tighter and I edged the speed up, keeping one eye on the tachometers — both holding steady at equal rpm.

What if one tach suddenly ran up to the red line — or worse, you felt the boat slip loose at the stern?

“Your escape plan is always go straight. Never yank the throttle back. Go straight, get control, then ease back to a comfortable speed and collect your wits,” Martin advised.

Even a PWC rider can tell you that the quickest ticket to instability is to suddenly stop the engine.

Performance 102: Holding Steady

With all the focus on turning, Barrie sees a lot of captains fail trying to maintain too much speed in a steady course. Running at speed is not just knowing how to work the controls; it’s about reading water.

“In performance boating, it’s not how fast you can go; it’s how long you can go fast,” he said. The most important thing when maintaining a course at speed is anticipating what’s happening on the water in front of you. 

“Sooner or later,” Barrie warns, “the boogie man will come. When you make a mistake and get caught, you usually know what you did before it happens.”

You won’t see the next wave coming — or you’ll change your grip on the helm on re-entry, feeding in rudder.

It’s that experience thing. Like with Jim Waters in his DCB.

Stepping to the dock, Shellie gushed to her husband, “You’re gonna be givin’ up some throttle time, Scott.”

Maybe the schools need to add another class topic that dates back to kindergarten: learning to share.

Learn more from Raritan Engineering about seacocks and how to balance safety while enjoying fast speeds while out on the water.

via Safe Boating at High Speeds

 Marine Head Units Experts Show You How to Change Out Your Trailer Tongue Jack

Your Marine Head Units Specialists Recommend Changing Out Jacks With Frequent Usage

Raritan Engineering Company your marine head units analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to change out your own trailer tongue jacks.

Your marine head units experts know that I go through a heavy-duty trailer tongue jack every three to four years. Corrosion, frequent use, and a hefty boat and trailer take a toll on these jacks, so I have become adept at changing them out. 

Sometimes the jack gets broken when boaters forget to raise it after they hitch up the trailer; it drags on the pavement and becomes damaged.

Getting Started
Skill Level: 1.5/5
Time to Complete: 1 Hour

Tools and Supplies
* Fulton 2,500-pound square-tube tongue jack ($78.99, anchorexpress.com)
* Floor jack
* 6-by-6-inch wood blocks
* Jack stands
* 3-by-3-foot sheet of ½-inch plywood
* Box/open-end wrench set
* C clip pliers ($15.99, acehardware.com)
* Reciprocating saw (to cut off rusted bolts)
* Safety glasses
* Marine grease

Changing Out a Trailer Tongue Jack

1. Use a Floor Jack

If the tongue jack goes kaput while the trailer is hitched to a tow vehicle, don’t stress. Your best marine head unit professionals know that you need to park the boat and trailer in their storage location and chock the tires. Use a sufficiently rated hydraulic floor jack to lift the trailer coupler just high enough to clear the tow ball. 

2. Support the Trailer Tongue

Place a sufficiently rated, adjustable jack stand under the trailer tongue, making sure it rests square and level under the metal tube that forms the trailer tongue. Your waterproof head unit analysts know that a piece of plywood under the stand will keep it from sinking into gravel, soft soil or turf.

Your Marine Head Units Professionals Remove the Anxiety of Changing Out Your Own Jacks 

3. Remove the Broken Tongue Jack

With the trailer properly supported, you can remove the old tongue jack. Your TruDesign specialists understand that jacks that bolt to the tongue or trailer frame are fairly easy to remove with a couple of wrenches, assuming the bolts and nuts that secure the jack are not badly rusted.

You can find more information as well as get assistance on TruDesign fittings and on how to change out your trailer tongue jacks at Raritan Engineering. 

4. Attach the New Jack

To keep installation simple and quick, buy the same model tongue jack as the one you are replacing. Your marine head experts say that this way you know it will fit, is sufficiently rated to support the tongue, and won’t create clearance issues, which is important with swing jacks. 

5. Raise the Tongue

With the new tongue jack installed securely, you can now use it to raise the trailer tongue enough to remove the jack stand(s). To keep the tongue jack working for as long as possible, grease the gears at the top of the jack and lightly coat the telescoping arm with grease. 

Feet and Wheels

Telescoping tongue jacks come in a wide range of styles and weight ratings. Most jacks with ratings of 2,500 pounds or more dispense with pivoting mechanisms and wheels, which become weak points when supporting heavy tongue weights.

So don’t forget these helpful pointers on how to change out your own trailer tongue jacks. 1) Make sure to use a floor jack;  2) support the trailer tongue;  3) attach the new jack;  and 4) raise the tongue. 

Raritan Engineering has more information on marine head units, TruDesign, seacocks, and on how to change out your own trailer tongue jacks. 

via Changing Out a Trailer Tongue Jack

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