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Your Toilet Macerator Suppliers Share Amazing Tips for Keeping Your Sails in Great Shape

Raritan Engineering your toilet macerator manufacturers would like to share with you this week some great information regarding the importance of good sail maintenance.

1. Keep your sails out of the sun

If you have furling systems, this may be just a matter of furling sails when not in use. For non-furling sails, this means covering or stowing sails. There are cover options for both mainsails and headsails, allowing the sail to stay rigged and protected between uses. 

2. Protect your furled sails

Most owners use sewn-on sun covers to protect furled sails. Sunbrella and WeatherMax are the fabrics commonly used for sun covers. For racer-cruisers and some racing sails like furling code zeros, there are lighter weight options such as UV-treated Dacron.

All sun covers should be inspected regularly and repaired if damaged. Generally speaking, covers should be re-stitched every three years or so to prevent more extensive damage to the fabric that can occur from flogging due to compromised stitching.

To provide maximum protection for your sails, sun covers require care and maintenance. Remember, if you can see the sailcloth below the cover…so can the sun!

3. Keep your sails clean

After sun, the second-worst enemy of any sail is salt; but other types of dirt and debris can be just as damaging. Periodic sail washing is key to maintaining your sails. A couple common-sense rules apply to frequency: 1) a sail that has been exposed to saltwater should be washed sooner rather than later, and 2) all other varying degrees of grime should be removed when possible. 

4. Protect them from the elements

Sailmakers generally refer to the life of a sail in hours or seasons, rather than years. The lifespan is affected by the amount of time sailing and the level of care given to the sails. In the mid-Atlantic region, the main sailing season can begin in early spring and extend late into the fall. 

If you know your sails are going to be sitting idle on the boat in a marina for at least a month or more during a sailing season, you can extend sail life by taking the sails off of your boat and stowing them. 

5. Inspect sails regularly

At least once-a-year sails should get a check-up. To do this yourself, find a dry place in good light where you can lay them flat, then work your way over every inch of the sail, looking for trouble spots such as abrasion or loose stitching. Small problems can turn into bigger problems later, so be sure to note even the smallest details. 

We Continue to Discuss Ways to Extend the Life of Your New Sails

6. Tape the turnbuckle

Your toilet macerator experts talk about how if you’ve ever scraped your finger on a piece of hardware, then you know it’s sharp enough to damage your sail. Even seemingly blunt objects (like a spreader) can damage sails on a tack, so take a look around (and up) to see what can or should be covered to protect your sails. If you have an extra piece of spinnaker cloth, wipe it across every surface of your boat and rigging. 

7. Check the leech

Even a well-protected spreader-tip or navigation light can wear a sail tack-after-tack. For these areas, a spreader-patch (or navigation light-patch, etc.) might be the answer.

8. Don’t wait for repairs

A lot of catastrophic sail failures can be traced back to a small repair that was never made. When you notice a small hole or a chafed spot that’s getting increasingly worse, save yourself serious head- and wallet-ache by addressing the problem while it is still small. 

9. Bag It

Pretty simple here. There’s a good reason new sails come with a sturdy bag and it’s not just another place for a logo. That bag is a much cheaper sacrificial covering than the sail inside of it. Take a look at an old sailbag that’s scuffed and torn-up, now imagine if that were your sail. 

10. If you don’t know, ask

Curious about some sail-care method you’ve heard somebody touting on the dock or trying to figure out if your sail could use a new piece of webbing on the tack? Feel free to call the service team at your local Quantum loft. We’re happy to field your questions and provide helpful pointers. Consider us a member of your team.

So don’t forget these great ways to keep your sails in great shape for a long time. 1) Keep your sails out of the sun;  2) don’t wait for repairs;  and 3) tape the turnbuckle.

Quieting Your Boat’s Engine

The engine in my 1977 Down East 45 schooner, Britannia, is a tried and trusted — but noisy — Perkins 4-236, an 85-horsepower four-­cylinder diesel. 

I call the space the equipment bay. It runs 12 feet under the saloon floorboards and is 3 feet wide at the sole level, then tapers to just 15 inches at the bottom of the 41⁄2-foot-deep bilge. Seven removable floorboards give amazing access to all the equipment below, but the large space also acts as a massive boombox.

There are a number of products that claim to significantly reduce noise from machinery, and some are specifically designed for boats. The trouble with most of these is they are also specifically aimed at your bank balance! 

In simple terms, the object of sound insulation is to absorb noise at its source, and thereby minimize what filters into the interior of the boat. It would be practically impossible to eliminate this altogether, but I had effectively reduced the engine noise from a similar diesel on a previous boat simply by installing a false floor beneath the cabin sole. 

Before I started work on Britannia, I wanted to take a reading of the sound levels to have a numerical comparison after the modifications were complete. I downloaded a neat iPhone app, a decibel meter by Decibel Meter Pro, for the vast sum of 99 cents, from iTunes. It was very easy to use, and I took readings at head height in the center of the saloon. 

Fitting the False Floor

To get started, it was first necessary to make support battens for the false floor panels to lie in, under the existing plywood sole. I bought a 24-by-48-inch sheet of ½-inch plywood and cut it into 4-inch-wide strips with my table saw. I also made ¾-inch square battens out of hardwood. 

I screwed the ¾-inch square battens to the sides of each aperture to support the ends of the false floors. I painted the beams and all the new timbers white.

The sound-deadening properties of a ½-inch-thick sheet are actually better than the ¾-inch-thick marine plywood sole, which is roughly 35 pounds per cubic foot. (The MDF sheets were also available in ¾-inch thickness but would have been heavier and more expensive. In the end, I decided to compromise between weight, density and price, and go for the thinner stock.)

The simplest, time-­honored method to handle boards covering apertures is to cut a hole in the board big enough to get a couple of fingers through to lift it in and out. But these MDF boards were too big and heavy for that, and it would also have allowed a little bit more noise and heat to escape.

The weight of the new fiberboards was 60 pounds, but it’s all positioned low in the hull, and it was a small price to pay for reducing the noise. When lying between the beams, their weight also keeps them firmly in place. The sole and subfloor now has a combined thickness of 1¼ inches, with a density of about 80 pounds per cubic foot.

Beat the Heat

To complete the project, there was one more thing I wanted to do. We could often feel heat permeating through the single-­thickness cabin sole when either of the diesel engines had been running a long time, especially on our own soles when walking barefoot. 

I bought two 4-by-8-foot sheets of Rmax Thermasheath R6 foam-board insulation from Lowe’s for $21.98 each. These are 2 inches thick, with aluminum foil on one face and an insulation rating of R6, which is the highest available for this thickness of foam. I cut them to the sizes I needed at the store using a sharp knife, which helped me fit them in my car. 

The section of floor around the Perkins engine was particularly awkward because parts of the top of the engine were higher than the bottom of the floor beams. In fact, the valve cover was only an inch below the sole. This was, of course, the principal source of all the noise, so it needed special attention anyway.

I fitted battens all around the engine as I had in all the other openings, then shaped pieces of fiberboard to fit around the engine as well.

The remainder of the floor now had the ¾-inch plywood sole pieces, with 2 inches of foam glued underneath, then a ½-inch air gap, then the ½-inch MDF false floor. It was now certainly a compact floor.

After all this backbreaking work, I was naturally keen to take new readings on the decibel meter. With only the main engine running at the same revolutions per minute as before, my iPhone app meter read 65, a reduction of 20 db! 

In addition to a considerable reduction in noise, there is now no perceptible heat coming through the floorboards, which helps to keep the living area cooler. Heat is carried outside by the engine-room extractor fans, and the noise from them is much reduced too.

Most projects I have undertaken on Britannia resulted in visible improvements, most notably when I renovated the teak-and-holly sole. 

This method of sound insulation would be very worthwhile for any boat, offering excellent noise reduction for minimal financial outlay. I actually used some spare pieces of MDF to double the wall thickness in the spaces where my two air-conditioning units were installed, and this reduced the noise of the compressor and fan as well.

There are, of course, no labor charges factored into the cost of the job, which took me four days to complete, but messing about on boats is supposed to be fun.

Visit us at http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/marine-toilets/seaera-et/ and see how Raritan Engineering provides you the best quality and selection in the marine sanitation industry today.

Be sure to watch our latest video on toilet macerators below.

via Extending the Life of Your Sails

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via Quieting Your Boat’s Engine

Melanie Neale

Raritan Toilet Macerator Manufacturers Give Great Tips for Finding a Trustworthy Broker When Selling Your Boat

Raritan Engineering your toilet macerator professionals would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to find the best broker to help you sell your boat.

However, for those who are looking to get the best price for their boat with minimal effort, a broker is usually a more sensible choice.

Before you choose a broker, here are some things to consider.

• A broker’s fee is always 10 percent upon the sale of the boat, but some offer more services than others for the same price. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted.

• Responsiveness. How quickly a broker responds to your inquiry is indicative of how they will respond to potential buyers. Give them 24 hours, and move on if they don’t respond or if they make excuses as to why they didn’t respond promptly. 

• Marketing. All brokers have access to Yacht World. Ask where else the broker will advertise your boat and expect to receive a written list of websites and print publications and social media. 

• Look at other listings. Ask a potential broker for links to some of their listings. If you don’t like the write-up, think the photos are shoddy, or if there isn’t enough information, move on.

• Comps. The average buyer and seller, despite what they might find perusing ads and looking at resources like BUC, do not have access to actual comps. Your broker does. In addition to knowing what is currently on the market, your broker should offer you information on how many similar boats have sold in your region recently, what they were listed at, how long they took to sell, and exactly what they sold for.

Your Toilet Macerator Experts Talk About How Finding a Good Broker Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated

• Paperwork, escrow, and protection during the closing process. Your toilet macerator specialists talk about how a broker will have an escrow account and will ask that all deposits be submitted to the account. The broker will have all the forms you need, and some even use programs like YachtCloser which simplify the process through e-signing. 

• Import duty. If you have purchased a foreign-built boat and plan to sell it in the US to a US citizen (regardless of your citizenship), import duty must be paid. Your yacht broker will help you find a customs broker. 

• Personality. You and your broker are forming a relationship, and chances are that you are already somewhat emotional about the sale of your boat. Your broker needs to understand this and be open and honest with you. 

So don’t forget these helpful suggestions when looking for a broker to help you sell your boat. 1) A broker’s fee is 10% after sale of the boat. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted;  2) ask a potential broker for links to some of their listings. If you don’t like the write-up, think the photos are shoddy, or if there isn’t enough information, move on;  and 3) make sure you can trust and get along with your broker.

Marina manager stole $2M by selling boats he didn’t own, authorities say

A convicted felon who managed a Jersey Shore marina stole more than $2 million from 13 people by illegally selling their boats, authorities said.

Denis Kelliher, 47, of Toms River, was indicted on counts of wire fraud, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Pennsylvania’s Eastern District said in a statement.

Kelliher, who worked at Trenton Marine in Toms River, used the money from the sale of the boats to pay off personal debts to associates, authorities said. He faces up to 20 years in prison and might have to pay restitution of $2,163,000 if convicted.

Kelliher ran a check-kiting scheme that caused a $7.6 million in bank overdraft fees and admitted he fraudulently obtained more than $600,000 in loans from two friends to pay down those fees.

Click here and learn more about macerating toilets and how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Choosing a Boat Broker

via Marina manager stole $2M by selling boats he didn’t own, authorities say

Your Toilet Macerator Manufacturers Discuss the Importance of Good Shorepower Cord Upkeep

Raritan Engineering your toilet macerator professionals would like to share with you this week some great information regarding AC shorepower cord maintenance tips.

One of the often overlooked maintenance items in the pre-season rush to the water is the AC shorepower system. Accredited surveyor and PS Contributor Capt. Frank Lanier sent a few scary photos from past surveys showing the common examples of neglect he has encountered.

Barring improper use or some owner fabricated MacGyverism gone bad (jury-rigged adapters, botched plug installations, etc.) overheating and corrosion are the primary causes of AC shore power cord problems. Charred plugs and receptacles are the most common and are a result of resistance build up due to loose or corroded connections, which in turn generate heat and the potential for fire. The problem is especially prevalent among boats that continually run high energy loads such as water heaters and air conditioning units.

Basic inspections of your AC shore power system are easily accomplished and are well within the ability of any boater. The first step is securing all AC power to avoid accidental shock hazards. Turn off your boat’s main AC breaker, then the shore pedestal breaker. Next unplug the shore power cord and verify that all other sources of power (such as power on-demand generators and DC to AC inverters) are turned off and their respective breakers secured in the off position.

Start your inspection with the shore power cord itself, ensuring it’s constructed of proper marine grade components, uses appropriately sized wiring, and is the shortest cord that will get the job done. Always replace cords that show signs of chafe, cracks, split insulation, or those having electrical tape repairs.

Your Toilet Macerator Experts Share Great Maintenance Tips With You

Your toilet macerator professionals continue discussing industry standards call for shore cords to have molded-on plugs with sealing flanges or appropriate weatherproof boots. The plugs themselves should be checked each time you disconnect shore power (prior to getting underway for example) or monthly at a minimum, particularly for discoloration or corrosion on or around pins and plug inlets.

By the time discoloration is visible at the front of a plug or inlet, you’ll typically find that the damage is greater upon opening up the back for inspection. If left uncorrected, the damage will snowball (due to increasing resistance and heat buildup) until it burns a hole through the face of the plug, possibly leading to a fire.

When inspecting your shore power cord it’s also crucial to check the dock pedestal outlet and your boat’s inlet receptacle, ensuring both are corrosion free and undamaged. Upon finding a charred power cord plug, many owners simply replace it or the cord itself, only to find the new one also damaged a short time later due to a burned dock receptacle or inlet.

Another good practice is checking the “feel” of the connection when plugging in. Those that feel loose or don’t seem to be making firm mechanical contact likely won’t provide good electrical contact either. Avoid using worn or damaged pedestal plugs and report them to marina personal as soon as possible.

Practical Sailor has looked at a variety of “smart plugs” that warn owners of impending problems. These include the SmartPlug, which watches for shorts, and Raritan’s reverse polarity alarm

Boat Maintenance Tips 

1. Manage Your Gelcoat with the Right Materials

The gelcoat on your boat needs proper maintenance to continue to protect it – yes, gelcoats are strong, but the wrong cleaners can dissolve them or stain them, so pick the right boat cleaners and use them regularly.  

2. Wipe Off Moisture – Any Moisture

Always keep a couple towels around, and wipe off your watercraft when it is wet. We don’t mean just when you pull out of the water, either – although drying after use is an important part of preventing waterline stains. But all types of moisture are bad for your boat if they linger. 

3. Know Your Oil Schedule

Be aware of the specific oil requirements for your boat, which vary based on the model and type of engine. Change your oil whenever required. The easiest way is to take your boat to a certified dealer and have them change your oil. 

4. Always Check the Engine Before an Outing

A boat engine requires careful maintenance, especially before you take your boat out for an excursion. Every time you use your boat, run through a checklist so that your engine is ready for the journey. Check the bilge and hoses for any sign of leaks, check the fuel level and never go out without plenty of fuel, and check the water coolant level if necessary. 

5. Dewax Before Applying a New Wax Coat

A new wax coat is a common pre-season step to getting your boat ready for the waves. However, you can improve the efficiency of the wax coat by dewaxing beforehand. Dewaxing solvents are readily available and easy to use, and your new wax coat will go on more smoothly afterward. 

So don’t forget these helpful tips regarding AC shorepower cord maintenance. 1) Botched plug installations, overheating and corrosion are the primary causes of AC shore power cord problems;  2) Charred plugs and receptacles are the most common and are a result of resistance build up due to loose or corroded connections;  and 3) another good practice is checking the “feel” of the connection when plugging in.

Click here for more information regarding Raritan Engineering and how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Boat Maintenance Tips | Family Handyman

via AC Shorepower Cord Inspections