Melanie Neale

Raritan Toilet Macerator Manufacturers Give Great Tips for Finding a Trustworthy Broker When Selling Your Boat

Raritan Engineering your toilet macerator professionals would like to share with you this week some great information regarding how to find the best broker to help you sell your boat.

However, for those who are looking to get the best price for their boat with minimal effort, a broker is usually a more sensible choice.

Before you choose a broker, here are some things to consider.

• A broker’s fee is always 10 percent upon the sale of the boat, but some offer more services than others for the same price. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted.

• Responsiveness. How quickly a broker responds to your inquiry is indicative of how they will respond to potential buyers. Give them 24 hours, and move on if they don’t respond or if they make excuses as to why they didn’t respond promptly. 

• Marketing. All brokers have access to Yacht World. Ask where else the broker will advertise your boat and expect to receive a written list of websites and print publications and social media. 

• Look at other listings. Ask a potential broker for links to some of their listings. If you don’t like the write-up, think the photos are shoddy, or if there isn’t enough information, move on.

• Comps. The average buyer and seller, despite what they might find perusing ads and looking at resources like BUC, do not have access to actual comps. Your broker does. In addition to knowing what is currently on the market, your broker should offer you information on how many similar boats have sold in your region recently, what they were listed at, how long they took to sell, and exactly what they sold for.

Your Toilet Macerator Experts Talk About How Finding a Good Broker Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated

• Paperwork, escrow, and protection during the closing process. Your toilet macerator specialists talk about how a broker will have an escrow account and will ask that all deposits be submitted to the account. The broker will have all the forms you need, and some even use programs like YachtCloser which simplify the process through e-signing. 

• Import duty. If you have purchased a foreign-built boat and plan to sell it in the US to a US citizen (regardless of your citizenship), import duty must be paid. Your yacht broker will help you find a customs broker. 

• Personality. You and your broker are forming a relationship, and chances are that you are already somewhat emotional about the sale of your boat. Your broker needs to understand this and be open and honest with you. 

So don’t forget these helpful suggestions when looking for a broker to help you sell your boat. 1) A broker’s fee is 10% after sale of the boat. Brokers asking you for funds up front should be immediately discounted;  2) ask a potential broker for links to some of their listings. If you don’t like the write-up, think the photos are shoddy, or if there isn’t enough information, move on;  and 3) make sure you can trust and get along with your broker.

Marina manager stole $2M by selling boats he didn’t own, authorities say

A convicted felon who managed a Jersey Shore marina stole more than $2 million from 13 people by illegally selling their boats, authorities said.

Denis Kelliher, 47, of Toms River, was indicted on counts of wire fraud, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Pennsylvania’s Eastern District said in a statement.

Kelliher, who worked at Trenton Marine in Toms River, used the money from the sale of the boats to pay off personal debts to associates, authorities said. He faces up to 20 years in prison and might have to pay restitution of $2,163,000 if convicted.

Kelliher ran a check-kiting scheme that caused a $7.6 million in bank overdraft fees and admitted he fraudulently obtained more than $600,000 in loans from two friends to pay down those fees.

Click here and learn more about macerating toilets and how Raritan Engineering always takes care of your marine sanitation supply needs.

via Choosing a Boat Broker

via Marina manager stole $2M by selling boats he didn’t own, authorities say