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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Specialists Help You Take Good Care of Your Outboards

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters analysts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding outboard motor painting tips.

Today, your marine hot water heaters experts know that many outboard motors are available in colors to complement the shade of your boat. Honda, Mercury and Suzuki, for example, all offer their outboards in at least two colors; Evinrude lets you add custom side plates and accents from a wide spectrum of color choices.

There are also companies that paint motors. The Miami-based Outboard Paint Shop, for instance, will paint an outboard in the 250 to 400 hp range for $1,200.

Yet there is a more economical, DIY option. The proprietary Quantum paint system from Engineered Marine Coatings (EMC2) utilizes a hybrid acrylic- polyester topcoat — a technology developed for the aerospace industry — to create an extremely durable and professional-looking finish.

Disassemble and Wash

Remove the cowl, the shroud from the midsection, and any plastic pieces or appliques that might interfere with the painting process. Remove the rubber seal around the bottom of the cowl and any other rubber grommets or gaskets that might interfere with painting exterior surfaces. 

2. Prep and Mask

Sand all surfaces to be painted with 350- to 400-grit sandpaper. Use a power sander on broad surfaces, but you might need to hand-sand hard-to-reach spots such as around the bracket and lower unit. 

3. Paint the Parts

Choose a windless day with low humidity and temperatures around 72 degrees. Protect the uncured finish from evening dew by starting early in the day or working in a covered area. Spray the dry surfaces with a medium coat of the Quantum 45-X-115 K adhesion promoter and let dry for five minutes. 

4. Reassemble and Debug

Allow the final coat to dry for 24 hours. Then remove all masking materials. Carefully reattach and reassemble all parts. If a bug or debris marred the finish while painting, wet-sand the spot with 1,500- to 2,000-grit wet sandpaper until the blemish is eliminated and the desired smoothness is achieved. 

How Many Cans?

Each Quantum 2K kit can be custom packed based on your motor size. It includes Quantum SR-002 Surface Prep/Clean, Quantum Adhesion Promoter, Quantum 2KA spray cans, rags, gloves, Scotch pad, tape and draping. 

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Professionals Equip You With the Skills You Need

You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine ice makers at Raritan Engineering.

Painting Outboard Parts

First off, your marine ice makers know that it is best that you do not plan any outings for at least 2 weeks when undertaking this task. Initially, it will take some time, especially if you are going to try to repaint parts on the powerhead. 

Keep in mind – Aerosol paint jobs are no where near as durable as a paint job done with quality paint from a gravity fed spray gun.

With Aerosol Can Paint

Here are the steps.

Items you need:

  1. Quality primer (self etching), paint, and clear coat.
  2. clear workspace
  3. wet sandpaper – 400, 800, 1000 – 2000 (available at automotive shops)
  4. Quality Rubbing / Polishing compound (3M Perfect-it II) removes fines scratches
  5. Plenty of time and patience.

Try to use a sanding block on flat surfaces and keep the pressure even. For other areas, you can obtain paint remover from local shops but it takes time to remove. It works great for those recessed areas, but it is messy and toxic.

Raritan Engineering Company has more information on marine hot water heaters, marine ice makers, and any marine sanitation device.

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Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Analysts Discuss All That’s New

Raritan Engineering Company would like to share with you this week information on marine hot water heaters and on keeping up to date on new sailing rules.

Every four years, on New Year’s Day of the year following the Olympic regatta, revised racing rules published by World Sailing take effect. This is the first of a series of articles covering important changes for 2017. 

New Rule 21: EXONERATION

When a boat is sailing within the room or mark-room to which she is entitled, she shall be exonerated if, in an incident with a boat required to give her that room or mark-room, (a) she breaks a rule of Section A, rule 15 or rule 16, or (b) she is compelled to break rule 31.

Revised Rule 21 will apply whenever a boat is “sailing within the room or mark-room to which she is entitled.” In the 2013-2016 edition of the rulebook, Rule 21 applies only if the rule entitling a boat to room or mark-room is a rule of Section C. Two rules require a boat to give another boat mark-room: Rule 18.2 and Rule 18.3, both in Section C. 

Your Marine Hot Water Heaters Professionals Want You to Avoid Being Disqualified

Your marine hot water heaters experts know that to see why the revised Rule 21 is a fairer rule, consider the common situation shown in Diagram A, which shows Tom and Jerry sailing on a run, spinnakers set. Tom overtook Jerry from clear astern, so Jerry may sail above his proper course (see Rule 17). 

Under the old rules, Tom would be disqualified for breaking Rule 11, but under revised Rule 21, Tom would be exonerated because, while responding promptly in a seamanlike way to Jerry’s luff, Tom was “sailing within the room to which he was entitled.” 

19.1 When Rule 19 Applies

Rule 19 applies between two boats at an obstruction except…(b) when rule 18 applies between the boats and the obstruction is another boat overlapped with each of them.

Rule 19.1(b) is a new rule for 2017. Since 2009, there have been two separate and different rules for passing marks and obstructions: Rule 18 for marks and Rule 19 for obstructions. Those two rules worked well for about five years, but in 2014, competitors and judges began to notice and publicize a problem that occurred when both Rule 18 and Rule 19 applied at the same time. 

To understand the problem, we need to study how the rules apply to the incident shown in Diagram B. In light wind, three Lasers are overlapped on port tack, approaching a leeward mark to be left to port. 

We had been applying Rule 18.2(b)’s first sentence to the incident, and we had overlooked the fact that Rule 19.2 also applied at Position 2. Rule 18.2(b) requires Otto to give both Mitch and Ina mark-room. 

So you can understand the need for the new Rule 19.1(b), assume that at Position 2, it becomes clear to Mitch and Ina that if Otto continues on his current course, he will not give Mitch and Ina enough space for both of them to round the mark without contact occurring between them or between Ina and the mark. 

Rule 19.2(b) is not required, nor was it ever intended, to apply in this situation. It only complicates the analysis. Because Rule 18 applies and Otto (the obstruction) is a boat overlapped with both Mitch and Ina, new Rule 19.1(b) will “switch off” Rule 19.2(b), leaving only Rule 18.2 to handle the rounding. 

The bottom line is this: If you, like almost everyone else, had not noticed the problem Rule 19.2(b) causes in the situation involving Otto, Mitch and Ina, know that new Rule 19.1(b) will allow you to continue rounding leeward marks just as you have been doing since 2009. Just keep doing what you have been doing, and all will be well.

Visit us at http://www.raritaneng.com/ for more information at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have more information on marine hot water heaters and on keeping up to date on new sailing rules.

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